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Thread: Mauser Identification

  1. #1

    Default Mauser Identification

    I saw a custom built Mauser the other day and don't know what it is. Has anybody saw one that the rear of the bolt was enclosed? On a normal Mauser the end of the bolt is open where you can look at the firing pin housing and see if the gun is cocked or not. This one was capped and you could not see anything except the cap and outside of the bolt. The gun looked to have the factory barrel in 30-06 caliber. Anybody know of a Mauser like this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cast Iron View Post
    I saw a custom built Mauser the other day and don't know what it is. Has anybody saw one that the rear of the bolt was enclosed? On a normal Mauser the end of the bolt is open where you can look at the firing pin housing and see if the gun is cocked or not. This one was capped and you could not see anything except the cap and outside of the bolt. The gun looked to have the factory barrel in 30-06 caliber. Anybody know of a Mauser like this?
    R U shore, it was a Mauser? Was it a CZ?

    Most BAs with the rear enclosed have a thingy, that sticks out from underneath for a cocking indicator.

    You can color it RED with a marky pen.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Mauser 3000 has an enclosed bolt shroud. post war commercial gun. Late 60's through 70's if I remember correctly. Mauser has made a number of different commercial bolt guns, not just 98's.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  4. #4

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    Gunbugs I done a search on a 3000 and this is not what I saw. The one I looked at had a round metal disc of some sort covering the end of the bolt. It looked something like a old single shot 22 that you used this piece to cock it with but this gun cocked when you opened the bolt or pulled it back one. I store my Mauser with it not cocked by pulling the trigger as I shut the bolt. I was going to do this to this gun and it snapped with the bolt open. The bolt would not close until I opened it again and then closed it. This gun was built by a gunsmith that was a friend of our family and passed away about 20 years ago. He was a excellent gunsmith and did very good work. This gun is for sale and I am interested if I can find out what it is and if it is of good quality. Gunsmiths can be like mechanics, some days working on a top of the line autos and other days working on low end stuff. Unless it is of good quality I do not need it.

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    lol bud that was no Mauser 98, you were looking at 1903 springfield.
    oh and pictures would reay help

  6. #6
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Like 323 said. Sounds like an '03 Springfield. Should have the markings on the receiver ring, unless they have been polished off.IMG_0367.jpg
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  7. #7

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    Gunbugs that picture looks a little like what I saw. The one I am looking at has a different safety. It has a slide safety in about the same place a Remington 700 safety would be. It has very few marks other than a serial number. There is one mark on the gun that looks like the markings in a hospital where they dispose of used needles. Like a bio-hazzard marking or close to this mark. I have tried several times to post pictures but I can not figure out how it is done. The picture Gunbugs posted looks very close except the safety.

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    The biohazard mark sounds like a Japanese Arisaka.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  9. #9

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    Gunbugs thanks for taking your time to answer these posts. I looked up the Arisaka rifle and I think this is what it is. I could not find a picture of one with a slide safety. I think I will pass on this gun. What is the quality on these guns? Again thanks to all who answered and tried to help.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Everyone will say that the Arisakas are strong, which they are. But I've always thought they were kind of a clunker as a sporter. Pretty hard to make an "elegant" sporter out of an Arisaka. With the safety to the side, the trigger has been replaced with a commercial unit.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  11. #11
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Here's an Arisaka sporter. Shows the side safety:

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=462178708

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