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Thread: Greenhouse humidity

  1. #1
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    Default Greenhouse humidity

    Last spring/summer I built a greenhouse and grew some tomatoes and a few other things in it. I had a real problem with humidity. On sunny days, it wasnít an issue. The greenhouse would get hot enough that I needed to ventilate for temperature control, which keep the humidity in check. However, on extended cloudy periods, I didnít want to lose heat and kept things shut and that caused the humidity to go way up. It got so bad that a fungus blew through the tomatoes destroying a lot of green and tomatoes.

    I want to prevent that this year. So, my question is, how do you keep the humidity levels down without losing a lot of heat? I really donít want to pay for supplemental heat in the greenhouse during the summer months when we have an extended cloudy period.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Are you running any fans? I run 2 in the winter and up to 5 in the summer.
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  3. #3
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Adequate air circulation and ventilation is the only practical solution. There's no escaping it.
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  4. #4
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    I did have a fan inside the greenhouse. Didn't do much for the humidity, just made the plants grow a little better and stronger.

    It's just hard for me to ventilate the greenhouse when it is 70F inside, just right, and 50F outside. Tomatoes don't grow well at 50 and I really don't want to add supplemental heat when there would be enough solar gain otherwise.

    Maybe better ventilation on the hot days so that everything tolerates the cool humid ones better?

  5. #5

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    Look into HAF fans for you GH. You need to get the air moving better within the house, helps with more than just fungus. Depending on the size of your house, you will most likely on need two fans, one on each side facing opposite directions.

  6. #6
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    It is hard to turn on the heat and crank open the vents at the same time, but air turn over is a good thing on cloudy cold days.

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