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Thread: Cabin Security

  1. #1

    Angry Cabin Security

    Need recommendation's for game camara's at the cabin.

  2. #2
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    FISHHOGG, I would take a look at the Browning Strike Force. I've recently researched the latest trail cameras and conclude that this is the one I'd buy for tradition game camera use. The reviews are excellent and the price is reasonable.

    http://browningtrailcameras.com/our-.../strike-force/

    If you're looking for something more sophisticated, I've also researched wireless/cellular game cameras. The one I'd get is the Covert 3G Code Black. It will email or text photos for your email account or cell phone. They're spendy, but if you have cell service at your cabin, it might be a better option for security purposes.

    I don't own either of these camera models, but I have a bunch of others, and if I was buying any new ones these are the way I'd go. I hope that's helpful to you.

  3. #3
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    Here's a link to the Covert camera I mentioned: http://covertscoutingcameras.com/pro...ps-code-black/.

  4. #4
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    I have cameras up at my cabin in Gray Cliff, but with the road going in we will need to step up security. Stupid tweakers, thieves, non working, stealing losers.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  5. #5
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    It's only going to get worse, guys. It's changed a lot over the last 15-20 years, and the peninsula gets more people like this every day.

  6. #6
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    I always try to set one up that is obvious then try to disguise one that looks at the obvious one. That way if anyone messes with the obvious one I can see them. So it get more expensive for two cameras but it gives me piece of mind. So far just critters where I am at, or people I know.

  7. #7

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    Game cameras are kind of like tools. They are good for different jobs. I had a Cuddeback with a flash that took the best
    predator pictures. It was good for trails because it was fast and took nice clear pictures. Then my Moultrie was good
    for over looking an area from up in a tree. But slow. I have a Stealth cam that was also good for fields but ate batteries
    terribly. I have a Bushnell that does a good job and it's smaller. So it's easy to hide. The Bushnell can go months on it's batteries. I have one of the Moultrie cameras that pivot to take pictures across an area. Which is great but harder to hide. My neighbor seems to do well with his
    Browning. I would buy a few small Brownings and or some small Bushnells. Newer models.

    All you can do is try to make it as hard as possible to get in and then get a picture of the burglars if they get in. I use the Moultrie in hotel and
    cabin rental situations. I had something stolen back in 2011 in the Yellowstone cabin. Even though we left the do not disturb sign out.
    The workers always show up before it's time to leave while you go to breakfast. So I attached the camera that pivots to the corner of the bed
    with a strap and cable. I also sometimes use it in campgrounds. It overlooks our tent at night. More for people than animals. I also carry some cheap driveway sensors that beep if someone walks past them. More for crowded campground camping. They are battery operated. I'm more protective because of our kids. It would also be different while camping out away from people.

    If you use padlocks. Maybe invest in a decent hard to cut and hard to pick Mul-T-lock. Or something similar. Make them work for it.

    I usually put one camera up high watching my tree stand and then another watching the camera. Make sure there aren't any
    ladders around. You could cut a boxed area out of a dead tree or stump and secure the camera to the wood. So in the shadows
    it's hard to tell it's within the stump. Maybe put one in something like a birdhouse. Some battery operated lights are motion and have
    a camera too. I'm not sure about the quality though. If there's electric. Install a dvr with some decent security cameras. Secure the
    dvr in a lock box of some kind.

  8. #8
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    What kind of card do you need for these cameras? I may look at the browning this weekend & just curious if everyone is using the Sandisk ultra 16 or 32, or will basic ones work just as good.

  9. #9
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Never had trouble with any cards, all seem to work. 16 is plenty, heck we use 4 and 8's.
    Bk

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