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Thread: Yurt for Hunting Camp/Home

  1. #1

    Default Yurt for Hunting Camp/Home

    Been researching options this past several years regarding a hunting camp/home building. My goal is to have a cabin...as many of us know it. If I could live there year round I would. That would be my goal. Any advice? I'm looking at several options (building not land). The yurt really has my interest. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Depends on the specifics of the locale/climate. Generally, I personally would shy away from a yurt if I wasn't going to be around more or less full time to maintain it.
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    All said and done cheaper to rough in a cabin or go tipi for snow and cold country
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    If you use a yurt and have it up in the summer, but your not staying in it at the time............the bears will keep an eye on it for you!
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    You can frame in a cabin for less money than the quality Yurt. It will also be stronger and more energy efficient.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I have a Yert for a shop behind my house, its warm and comfy, you can put a layer of insulation ( I bought cheap sleeping bags) and make it really warm, and you can take it down, perhaps box it up in a box that doubles as your bed platform or something, but ya, if your not around, a Yert isnt quite what ya want to be leaving standing. If you want to stay seasonally, think about storing it. It takes less than an hour to put up with two people, into a fully functioning abode.
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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Spernard Building Supply sells those quick to assemble cabins for less than $20k maybe even close to $10k. They advertise everywhere. And they can arrange to have them shipped. They claim you can have them built in a weekend.

    Also check out the Alaska owned Intershelter domes as a Yurt alternative, they arrive on a shipping pallet, and the bears won't get into them either.

    Sobie2

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    The yurts that are available to rent in k-bay park are bomber. Several of them are left up year round. I think they sell some off with a years worth of wear every season. An adjacent absentee landowner near me has one that is up all the time and rarely used and it still looks new. They are all made by nomad shelter.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    How much snow do they see Dave? Last winter, with the rain in January/February on top of the snow killed a couple Yurts around here that weren't occupied. Had they been occupied they would have melted the snow off.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Tim- I know a couple folks in the Interior who leave them up year round...they're still standing as far as I know and have been for a while.

    If it was a place I was only going to be in for a few weeks a year and vacant the rest of the time, I'd look really hard at something like that new XXXL Arctic Oven on a bomber tent platform..could even integrate a storage locker or something for the tent to stay on site. I'm leery of properties left unattended... Even a cabin can get quite the wrecking from a bear.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    Back around 2004 or so I met a couple in their Seward yurt. They said they were just gonna summer in it and build a cabin in the meantime. Turns out they didnt get around to the cabin at all and were still living in it with four kids. The oldest about 14 yrs old at the time I met them all. Apparently they ended up making it thru the first winter in Seward with a few modifications and made it better yr after yr.
    I also had a friend out Miller Pt Rd that put one up as a rental that I got a tour of. Very impressive, and I know the owner felt highly of his new bungalow.
    Seward stays relatively warm but boy, they get snow. And that family was deep in it. Wonder if its still there. Bet it is.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  12. #12

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    Thanks guys for the feed back. I'm looking at a year round place to stay. I no longer have a need to be located in Anchorage on a full time bases but that doesn't mean I'm ready to camp 100 airplane miles in remote Alaska from a hub. Something accessed by the road system. I'd stay in the yurt year round. Its the fulltime lifestyle I'm looking at. Was just curious to hear from the crowd in the know what their experiences in Alaska might have been.

  13. #13
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    It will only take a bear a few minutes to destroy it for you, my canvas tent has plenty of battle scars lol. Last year I invested in a bear fence that I run off a 12 volt marine battery so now I don't have to worry every time I leave camp.
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

  14. #14

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    For an unattended camp (as other have stated) I would say not,primarily because of possible bruin problems.

    For a full time residence I would unhesitatingly say "absolutely, yes!" I lived and worked out of a yurt for a family as a handler for a kennel. The open area and heating efficiency amazed both my wife and myself. During the big snow event of Christmas Eve 2011 Willow got something like 36"-40" of snow that night and morning. Everything was buried. In this particular development snow weight was playing hell with everyone else's roofs, but the yurt roof was clean, dry, and the only problem with snow concerning the yurt was digging out the water hydrant to feed and water the dogs.

    It's not for everyone but I personally love yurts. Dogs pretty much keep the beasties at bay outside the perimeter as long as they are allowed to do their job in this capacity. A really determined bear? Honestly, I don't know of a shelter a man with basic tools and know-how can erect that will prevent that particular calamity.

    HTH,

    Jim~

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunder chicken1 View Post
    It will only take a bear a few minutes to destroy it for you, my canvas tent has plenty of battle scars lol. Last year I invested in a bear fence that I run off a 12 volt marine battery so now I don't have to worry every time I leave camp.
    Well.....kinda like a house with locked doors but has windows only keeps the "honest" thieves out, a bear fence will only keep a "not too hungry" bear out.......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
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    I had a problem bear and after using the fence and the bear getting a good zap it moved to the other side of the river, never came back on the side I'm on the rest of the summer/ fall. I bought a bear fence that was designed in Alaska for Alaska from Eagle enterprises, inc. in Anchorage, I highly recommend as not all bear fences are created equal............
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

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