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Thread: Questions on enclosed snogo trailers...

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    Default Questions on enclosed snogo trailers...

    I just bought a 14 ft'r and have a couple questions to those that use them.
    The floor in this is three quarter inch plywood. Should this be reinforced with another layer of ply or maybe lay down some indoor/outdoor carpet to keep the ply from getting torn up by the skis?
    Also, there are as of yet, no tie down eyes in the trailer. What kind of arrangement on the floor do u use and what kind of straps do u like to tie them in place?
    Any other info I should know about?
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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Might want to ad some of those hard plastic ski runners to keep the carbides from tearin up the plywood. If ya run studs an old track works great to keep,the studs from tearing up the ply as well.
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    Find a old bed liner and cut strips to use for runners for the skis. Then get old snowmachine tracks and put that down for the track to run on gives you good traction and protection from studs.

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    I second the old bedliner. I have one on my open trailer. Just be careful walking on it when it has snow on it. You'll be down faster than you can say "Oh Poop." Also 3/4 flooring is more than enough if your bracing is on 2' centers. Mine is only 1'/2 and I haul my wheelers on mine. The 6 wheeler is much heavier than a snow go......well unless you have a Yamaha RX-1 Ton.
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    I used composite wood.....don't remember the brand but it has grooves on the backside. If you run a sled with good sharp carbides and studs this is a great way to go and I now have not had to change out now in 4 seasons. I use to only get maybe two seasons out of the plastic stuff.

    But I am running 4 sleds in and out as much as 3 or 4 times a week. The composite is obviously way heavier but it was my solution for longer use between change out. A couple of other things....it will not bunch up with temp changes, it's not slippery when it gets wet, the cross pieces give great traction for the sleds while keeping the studs (I am running 1.75 inch studs) off the wood deck. They also give good traction for the wheelers to come in and out. The last thing is I have less pullouts/breakoffs with the composite then I did the plastic stuff. Unfortunately I always have someone that is a little throttle heavy loading at times.

    So having the thicker composite also allows me to use surface mount loops for tie down points. I run a strap on the front and a strap on the back. In the event of a mishap insurance companies may disallow any claims for damage if not properly secured. Just something to consider. I know many that just load and go. Even ski bar tie downs alone are not sufficient. A strap on the rear is needed to be properly secured.

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    Thanks for the responses. Forgive my ignorance on the subject. I've never seen/been around this kind of operation. So a bit confused on some statements.
    What is a 'hard plastic ski runner' and where would one get one to protect from the carbide damage? Skidoo shop?
    As for bedliner strips... I assume you cut them six to ten inches wide and attach it to the floor from end to end so that it is the same width as my sled's skis? And where pray tell, does one find an old bedliner? Same with old snogo track?
    Dupont... I like your composite wood idea. Did u change out the entire floor w it? Or just reinforce with?
    Hmmmm. Still pondering. Maybe run just thinner (3/4") strips across the trailer floor all the way up about a foot apart? That would/should keep the carbides off the deck pretty well and provide some needed traction.
    I have a 750+ pound Skandik and an Expedition to put in it. I also have 6 metal looped tie down units to install in the floor. I want to see how the 2 machines fit in the trailer before I select where I want them installed. I don't expect them to fit side by side in the trailer due to width. I'm thinking I'll have to stagger them. And adjust the tie down points to what works for those two machines.
    Keep the advice coming.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Thanks for the responses. Forgive my ignorance on the subject. I've never seen/been around this kind of operation. So a bit confused on some statements.
    What is a 'hard plastic ski runner' and where would one get one to protect from the carbide damage? Skidoo shop?
    As for bedliner strips... I assume you cut them six to ten inches wide and attach it to the floor from end to end so that it is the same width as my sled's skis? And where pray tell, does one find an old bedliner? Same with old snogo track?
    Dupont... I like your composite wood idea. Did u change out the entire floor w it? Or just reinforce with?
    Hmmmm. Still pondering. Maybe run just thinner (3/4") strips across the trailer floor all the way up about a foot apart? That would/should keep the carbides off the deck pretty well and provide some needed traction.
    I have a 750+ pound Skandik and an Expedition to put in it. I also have 6 metal looped tie down units to install in the floor. I want to see how the 2 machines fit in the trailer before I select where I want them installed. I don't expect them to fit side by side in the trailer due to width. I'm thinking I'll have to stagger them. And adjust the tie down points to what works for those two machines.
    Keep the advice coming.
    It's not really a reinforcement as it is protection from carbides and studs (so it was added to the original deck).....I also just lay pieces all the way across from the ski strips, helps eliminate tripping hazards or makes for good traction points for walking or?????? My trailer is a 28 footer and I don't think I have $200 in the composite. The trailer also required three trailer protector kits to complete the trailer....so it was getting expensive. Last thing is the wide and thicker composite does allow sleds of different configurations to use the ski strips without hitting the original deck.

    I will advise against the traction mat. Seems the wood underneath never dries. Paddle trax is another option for your track but pricey and does not hold up well to studs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Thanks for the responses. Forgive my ignorance on the subject. I've never seen/been around this kind of operation. So a bit confused on some statements.
    What is a 'hard plastic ski runner' and where would one get one to protect from the carbide damage? Skidoo shop?
    As for bedliner strips... I assume you cut them six to ten inches wide and attach it to the floor from end to end so that it is the same width as my sled's skis? And where pray tell, does one find an old bedliner? Same with old snogo track?
    Dupont... I like your composite wood idea. Did u change out the entire floor w it? Or just reinforce with?
    Hmmmm. Still pondering. Maybe run just thinner (3/4") strips across the trailer floor all the way up about a foot apart? That would/should keep the carbides off the deck pretty well and provide some needed traction.
    I have a 750+ pound Skandik and an Expedition to put in it. I also have 6 metal looped tie down units to install in the floor. I want to see how the 2 machines fit in the trailer before I select where I want them installed. I don't expect them to fit side by side in the trailer due to width. I'm thinking I'll have to stagger them. And adjust the tie down points to what works for those two machines.
    Keep the advice coming.
    Verbas outside Soldotna has the UHMW strips made for trailers, but they want a lot for them, I don't recall the exact price but I'm thinking like $250 for the kit for my 10' trailer.

    I really like the composite deck idea, might just do my whole trailer in it!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    I used composite wood.....don't remember the brand but it has grooves on the backside. <snip> the cross pieces give great traction for the sleds while keeping the studs (I am running 1.75 inch studs) off the wood deck. They also give good traction for the wheelers to come in and out.
    I assume you're talking about this stuff: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Veranda-A...-202594363-_-N

    I'm also trying to visual what you're talking about "cross pieces". Are you laying this stuff on your deck from side to side and driving across it "sideways"? As opposed to the method for using plastic ski glides that are in line with the ski travel? http://www.trailerpartsdepot.com/ite...c=13320&eq=&Tp=

    Got a photo of your setup?
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    Joat yes that is what I am using.

    I layout the boards just like you would the UMHV stuff and then between the ski runners I run a board about every 2 feet. On my door ramps I run it closer. I will get a picture here as soon as I get home.

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    If you do the complete trailer with the composite material you will add a lot of wt. to the trailer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    Joat yes that is what I am using.

    I layout the boards just like you would the UMHV stuff and then between the ski runners I run a board about every 2 feet. On my door ramps I run it closer. I will get a picture here as soon as I get home.
    Ah, I'm tracking now. So you basically run 4 lines of composite along the length of the trailer to match ski runs, then fill in between with cut cross pieces for the tracks. Sounds like a really good idea.
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    Yeah....Thanks for the posts and the links. I'm seeing some of what u'r meaning now. I have a bunch of 1" x 4" planking laying around and I thought of using it to run 'across' the deck every ft or so from top to bottom but didnt like the idea of having to put so many screws thru the existing deck for each plank.
    I sorta like the idea of the plastic ski runners that were posted in the link above. My trailer is not quite wide enough to drive both machines in forward and fit side by side so one will be backed in after the first one is driven in straight forward.
    I dont like the idea of putting anything down like carpeting for moisture concerns but am considering just investing in a few sheets of quarter inch plywood and scewing each sheet down to the existing deck with 4 screws each. One in each corner. When the quarter inch ply gets wore out,, change it out. That would leave the original deck unmarked. Very little weight added and easy to do. And only 4 holes/screws in the original deck per sheet.
    I might have to see where my machines need to ride for trailer balance before I install some tie down eyes in the deck.
    What do u guys think of my overlay ply idea? Seems a pretty simple cheap way to go?
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    One of the big advantages of the plastic or the composite is that you can pull a sled with skags backwards where as with the wood they have a tendency to hang up.

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    Big Bend...yes that is a disadvantage is the weight of the material but my man purse stays a lot heavier then having to change out the plastic every year and half to two years. Plus depending on the kit I normally needed three kits, PLUS I have to get something for the tracks. Most of the UHMV stuff used for traction does not hold up well to studs or screws. Thinner material also rips out easily on the ramps versus the wide 3.5 inch material.

    Cod I did not see whether this was a new or used trailer....if used invest in a can of thompsons water seal and coat the bed before you put anything down. I will second what Big Bend said about the runners sticking to the wood bed. Why won't your sleds fit side by side? Skandic is about 36" wide and the Expedition about 38". I hate to see sleds on trailers backwards. This causes a lot of unforeseen issues, like tongue weight, frame stress and a few other things.

    A couple of things for all to consider. If you have one sled loaded on your trailer centered on the trailer is way better then to one side. Always check tongue weight. If your trailer is wiggling side to side going down the rode at highway speed just a little, your tongue weight is most likely lite. Check your tire pressure often. Check your tire wear. Most trailers because of the roads having deep grooves in them will wear a lot quicker on the inside. A good investment is a towing set of mirrors especially when the trailer is wider then the tow vehicle. Many times most do not even realize that then have crossed the line with the trailer. Putting sleds on trailer sideways is NOT LEGAL(but many times ignored).....this makes your load over 10 feet wide and will get you a ticket and impounded if the right guy wants to be a PIA. Last thing get under your trailers and look for cracks and bolt holes getting oblonged out. Tongue attachment points, especially tilt beds, suspension attachment points and aluminum trailers in general need to be inspected at least once a year. These are some of the areas I have seen cracks or trailer problems I have encountered.

    Sorry for the hijack,,,,,,I will go back to my corner. Blame the low snow conditions. I have way more time on my hands then usual this time of year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    Cod I did not see whether this was a new or used trailer....if used invest in a can of thompsons water seal and coat the bed before you put anything down. I will second what Big Bend said about the runners sticking to the wood bed. Why won't your sleds fit side by side? Skandic is about 36" wide and the Expedition about 38". I hate to see sleds on trailers backwards. This causes a lot of unforeseen issues, like tongue weight, frame stress and a few other things.

    A couple of things for all to consider. If you have one sled loaded on your trailer centered on the trailer is way better then to one side. Always check tongue weight. If your trailer is wiggling side to side going down the rode at highway speed just a little, your tongue weight is most likely lite. Check your tire pressure often. Check your tire wear. Most trailers because of the roads having deep grooves in them will wear a lot quicker on the inside. A good investment is a towing set of mirrors especially when the trailer is wider then the tow vehicle. Many times most do not even realize that then have crossed the line with the trailer. Putting sleds on trailer sideways is NOT LEGAL(but many times ignored).....this makes your load over 10 feet wide and will get you a ticket and impounded if the right guy wants to be a PIA. Last thing get under your trailers and look for cracks and bolt holes getting oblonged out. Tongue attachment points, especially tilt beds, suspension attachment points and aluminum trailers in general need to be inspected at least once a year. These are some of the areas I have seen cracks or trailer problems I have encountered.
    Sorry for the hijack,,,,,,I will go back to my corner. Blame the low snow conditions. I have way more time on my hands then usual this time of year.
    Dupont,,,, By all means, keep firing away. You're adding well to this. There are always alot of ways of doing things but some just work 'better' than others and sometimes some of us can only envision a certain way in our head. Thanks for your insight.
    My trailer is an 09 but is virtually unused. Inside is in fantastic shape. Outer skin is fantastic. Apparently it sat for awhile and used to store some stuff. I did find and replaced one bolt that fell out of a fender and noticed one piece of front trim that needs attention but overall is in 'new' looking shape. The only thing that shows any age is the somewhat rusted steel springs and hubs under it.
    My Skandik SWT has wide plastic ski skins that make it 45 inches wide. The Expedition was about 40(?) inch. Trailer just 6 inches or so too narrow, IIRC.
    I agree with u on painting in some Thompsons or the like. That was my plan b4 screwing any other decking down.
    I have trailered alot of equipmt over the yrs so am familiar w proper loading. The tandem axel 14 ft trailer has the wheels set far enough to the rear that I think i would be good loading EITHER machine first but thats why I thought I may play around w some diff loading scenarios before securing some load tie down pts. The Skandik at 750 lbs and the Expedition probly 400(?). Thought I would need the heavier sled in first but now not so sure it matters. Will examine more to see.
    Both sleds loaded up easy when I tried the other day. Loaded the Exp first straight in then backed the Skandik in. They loaded surprisingly easy and well. Skandik drove straight out easily but have not yet tried backing out the Exp. although I cant see why it wouldny back out easier than the Skandik backed 'in'. Just didnt try it yet.
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    Dupont, I did not say that using the composite would add weight in the way that you used it,but limon32 in post #8 mention about doing the complete deck, that would be a lot of unneeded wt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    Dupont, I did not say that using the composite would add weight in the way that you used it,but limon32 in post #8 mention about doing the complete deck, that would be a lot of unneeded wt.
    Tongue weight! Good point though, I'll have to compare the weight before Ido my whole trailer!


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    I lined the floor of my trailer with plastic lattice (for fencing). Cut it to fit and secured it with 3/4' hex head self-tappers for traction.

    If your sleds are too wide set exactly side-by-side just stagger the loading. Pull the first more forward and park the second so its skis are aft of the first one's skis.

    Consider adding additional tie-down points based on your preferred parking layout. Accidents happen and unsecured sleds smashing around in an out-of-control or flipped trailer make a serious mess.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    I lined the floor of my trailer with plastic lattice (for fencing). Cut it to fit and secured it with 3/4' hex head self-tappers for traction

    Ohhh, I like that idea!
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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