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Thread: Rivers to Run with a Two-Stroke Prop?

  1. #1

    Default Rivers to Run with a Two-Stroke Prop?

    I recently bought a 16' jon boat with a 2-stroke 35HP johnson prop. Center console steering. I know 2-strokes aren't allowed on the Kenai and most of the rivers I have ran in the past - like 20 miles and Placer Creek - require a jet. Obviously the Big Su and Yetna are good options for my boat. What are some other rivers within a few hours of Anchorage that are navigable with a prop? I'm looking just to explore, hunt, fish, camp, whatever.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    No love on this thread. Just looking for some fun rivers that are navigable with a prop. Anyone? Are there just no options this far south?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckreitel View Post
    No love on this thread. Just looking for some fun rivers that are navigable with a prop. Anyone? Are there just no options this far south?
    define a few hours

    I really know nothing. My experience is taking the highway to Denali and down to Hope. What about the copper? Tanana? Knik? Or are those to far away?

  4. #4

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    Little Su might work, but there are shallow sections that you would want to watch for, not to mention the larger boats doing 20-30+ around blind corners.

  5. #5

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    I'm pretty sure the Knik is way to shallow for a prop and hard to read because it's so silty. Does anyone have any experience running the big su with a prop? I'm sure there are sections where it's fine and others where it's too skinny...

  6. #6
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckreitel View Post
    I'm pretty sure the Knik is way to shallow for a prop and hard to read because it's so silty. Does anyone have any experience running the big su with a prop? I'm sure there are sections where it's fine and others where it's too skinny...
    The Big Su and the YeNtna are easily navigated with a prop. Once you learn to read the water, and learn a little something about where the channel really is. So how do you learn to read the water, and get some experience? You buy a couple extra props for your outboard and get out there and go. It won't take you too long to learn that little ripple on the water isn't from the wind, it's because the water is too skinny for your boat... After you wrestle your boat off of a sand bar, or out of a shallow spot, you learn to pay attention better, because you just don't want to have to do that again - right away. Running these rivers in Alaska there is an encyclopedia of information to keep in mind... 1) Save enough gas to get back with. 2) which probably should be 1)... Tell someone where your going and when you expect to get back. 3) have spare props, plugs, gas filter, tools, water pump repair kit, 4) etc., etc., etc., but above all, go out there and have some fun. My wife raised 3 boys in Alaska.... 2 Son's and a husband! When our 2 son's (aged 48 and 46) come home, or stop by, they love to talk about "the time Dad ran aground and was stuck for 2 days, or the time Dad pulled and pulled to start a cantankerous Outboard, only to discover the (bleeping) gas line had come unattached to the gas tank.. Or about several near disasterous crossing of the cook inlet. Your misadventures today make great conversation in years to come...

  7. #7
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Remember to carry enough beer and cash to get you unstuck, and remember there are a lot of places that your cell phone wont work.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckreitel View Post
    I'm pretty sure the Knik is way to shallow for a prop and hard to read because it's so silty. Does anyone have any experience running the big su with a prop? I'm sure there are sections where it's fine and others where it's too skinny...
    Like I said, I know nothing. Lol. One thing I've learne in my short time out here. Get out during winter with GPS and mark the channel on te rivers you will be on. Then you will have an idea where the depth is. There are sections out here (on the yukon) that look plenty deep, but it's only 6 inches deep.

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    just buy a jet unit....

  10. #10
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    I have a 20' with. 50hp
    Prop. It's good for dipping. I ran the big sue a ways but chewed rocks everytime you go to shore. Current was to fast to coast in, had to keep it powered up.
    I've wanted a jet ever since.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  11. #11

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    Yeah - unless you're willing to trailer your boat north of the Alaska Range your options will be limited. IIRC the Big Su is a b!tch to read, however, the Yetna has plenty of water up to Deep Creek.

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