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Thread: Thoughts on the 375 Ruger

  1. #1

    Default Thoughts on the 375 Ruger

    My son has become friends with folk in the Bison raising business. Looks like shooting one of them could be in my future. These are fre ranging bison and the owner of the operation says it can be pretty hard to get within 45-70 range of them. They have a hundred sets of eyes on the watch all the time. The landscape is pretty open at the foothills of the Rockies so putting the Indian sneak on them isn't easy...enter a 375 Ruger. I had one once but not long enough to play with...I think it's in you alls fine state now.

    Anyhow I would like to hear your opinions in regards!

  2. #2

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    Should be dandy, as are several other rounds already in your stable. That shouldn't slow you down in getting another and using it.

    Good friends have something north of 500 free-range buffalo on their ranch, which is a mix of the open hilly terrain you describe, as well as canyons and steep country. They sell hunts, and most are done from horseback. Over the years they've put a whole lot of hunters on buff and seen a whole lot of rounds in use. They hold the minimum to rounds in the 30-06 class, whether the holes are .277 or .358. Any good hit kills them and the range is there when you need it.

    Dad has long carried a 348, and son usually carried an 06. Only complaints they've ever shared with me center around marksmanship. They always have a sight-in session with hunters to "make sure the zero hasn't changed," but it's actually all about seeing how well the hunter shoots, so they know how close they have to place them for a shot.

    My impressions from reading your posts here, you'll have no problems in the marksmanship department, which should open lots of doors on caliber choices. I'm not trying to take away good reasons to own a 375. Your prospective hunt is more than enough reason!

  3. #3
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Shot my moose this year at 385 yds with my 375 Ruger using handload - 300 grain nosler accubond. He dropped where he stood. Clean pass through and did not recover the bullet. Should be more than enough to kill anything in N America and probably on the face of the planet. I wouldn't hesitate hunting T-Rex with mine. It is deadly accurate, but I did have a trigger job done and the stock full bedded. It has become my go to rifle.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

  4. #4
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Ya still got one of them custom 338-06 laying around I would think that would be a sweet long range buff gun EKC!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Everybody that I know that has one loves it.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6

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    Love mine, accurate, lots of energy and easy to shoot. If you don't reload, the factory options are still pretty good. God willing I won't ever part with mine.

  7. #7
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    I have a 375 Ruger Guide Gun with the 20" barrel. Very accurate and enjoyable to shoot. Chronograph-ed the factory Hornady 270gr. at 2777fps. Shot a mule deer doe on a damage control hunt. Less meat damage then my 270wsm would of done. Very happy with mine.

  8. #8

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    I'm happy with my 375 guide gun as well. I was searching for a while for a left handed something in medium bore and it was about the only thing available. It's more accurate than I am, and the 9 lb total package buffers the recoil nicely without being a handicap. It's also very easy to get through brush with it being under 40" though a part of me wishes it had a longer barrel to get more use out of the cartridge's powder. But still, it's not like it needs more power. And that kind of leads me to the conclusion that the 375 H&H was just fine. If the 375 H&H isn't enough, then put the 375 Ruger in a 24"+ barrel for better range or step up to a 416. And sure enough, Ruger has only marketed the 375 Ruger as just a more compact 375 H&H, except it also costs more powder and recoil to do it. It's still a great cartridge but if I had a choice of the ruger guide gun in 375 Ruger or H&H, I think I would go with the H&H. All that said, I would actually prefer a 35 Whelen or 358 Norma with the same attributes of the Ruger Guide Gun.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    Ya still got one of them custom 338-06 laying around I would think that would be a sweet long range buff gun EKC!
    My 338-06 is in my Nephews hands in southern Mo. He pestered me about buying it one two many times. I could use a 358 win, however I have so much 375 Ruger stuff that I need to do the 375 Ruger. Maybe need is the wrong word.

  10. #10

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    Replace that 375, and hunt in good health!

    Never shot a buffalo myself, but I've helped on numerous recoveries from the field. Be ready for some serious good eats. My usual "price" for helping is the tongue, heart and liver, which clients seldom want, but every once in a while the ranchers are kind enough to put a bit of their share my way- the ribs.

    Don't come home without every scrap of eating meat off that great animal. It's all good.

  11. #11
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    Love my Alaskan, with a trigger job of course. A one inch factory gun with hand loads. It shoot 270g TSX with RL15 great. The 250g TTSX and RL17 is looking real promising at over 2750fps. A 250g bullet going 30-06 velocities, ya buddy. Put the right glass on it and it is a 300 yard gun with some practice. It is easy to reload for. Both Nosler and Hornady make fine brass that is readily available, at least online. Bullet choice is unlimited. Yep, it's a keeper especially if big furry critters are to be had.

  12. #12

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    I have the stainless 23" african model and it has become my go to gun. I load it with the 250 TTSX and RL17 at 2890 fps. That gives me a trajectory of +/- 3" from 0-282 yards. With other options in my safe I have found myself grabbing my 243 during winter predator hunts and the 375R for everything else...

  13. #13

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    Dang! You guys are hard on me! I about had myself talked out of it then these last two posts. Brown Bear,I can remember helping my grandpa quarter up a beef to sell to the city folk and they never wanted the tongue. It ain't like your french kissing a cow. You don't have to eat the taste buds and the way my grandma cooked it in roaster or boiled it it just fell apart. The meat underneath was second to none. I gotta admit though I'm not for eating the liver. My Dad loved fried liver and onions with parsnips thrown in. I can remember walking into the house when that was frying and how bad it stunk the place up. The liver is step one in turd production and I won't eat it. I will eat the heart. It has to be fixed right and my little Lady knows how!

    Daved, your right on. the 375 Rooger is a thumper. Dang I've got 200 shiny new brass and a whole bunch of different 375 bullets. I have a half dozen boxes of those 200 grain flat nose bullets that Sierra made for the 375 Winchester. Imagine what one of those would do to a coyote after being driven twice as fast as they were designed to go. Might even have me a dandy coyote gun for hunting on windy days!

  14. #14
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    I have a 375 Ruger Guide Gun and real happy with it. So far I have used it on a damage control deer hunt. Shot a mule deer doe at 150yds. with the factory Hotnady 270gr. ammo. High shoulder shot and she was dead before hitting the ground. What I like about the 375 Ruger was no blood shot meat compared to the 270wsm that I normally use. I topped it off with a Leupold 2.5-8x36mm using Alaskan Arms quick detach scope rings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Dang! You guys are hard on me! I about had myself talked out of it then these last two posts. Brown Bear,I can remember helping my grandpa quarter up a beef to sell to the city folk and they never wanted the tongue. It ain't like your french kissing a cow. You don't have to eat the taste buds and the way my grandma cooked it in roaster or boiled it it just fell apart. The meat underneath was second to none. I gotta admit though I'm not for eating the liver. My Dad loved fried liver and onions with parsnips thrown in. I can remember walking into the house when that was frying and how bad it stunk the place up. The liver is step one in turd production and I won't eat it. I will eat the heart. It has to be fixed right and my little Lady knows how!

    Daved, your right on. the 375 Rooger is a thumper. Dang I've got 200 shiny new brass and a whole bunch of different 375 bullets. I have a half dozen boxes of those 200 grain flat nose bullets that Sierra made for the 375 Winchester. Imagine what one of those would do to a coyote after being driven twice as fast as they were designed to go. Might even have me a dandy coyote gun for hunting on windy days!
    You make life exciting, EKC:

    I never paid much attention to the 375 Roogar, before, but it seems to be an improved 375 over the H&H with a bolt head the same size as the belted Mags. and short enough OAL to fit in a standard LA. Both of which should be an advantage, or so tis said. It's gotta be a Thumper, since the H&H is a thumper.

    I'm surprised, it isn't more popular than it is. Especially considering some of the rifles it's being chambered in.

    As to whether you need one, I dunno. You could get a 7 Mag. or borry Smokey's 280.

    But, anyway, if it all works out, send me a picture of you in your Buffalo Robe, eating RAW Buffler Liver. Write on the back, that it's you, because, I'm sure you will look just like Smokey does when he goes out to howl at the moon, every month or so .

    Smitty of the North
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    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    http://www.cdnnsports.com/375rug-hkm...tml#.VKHU-v8Dw

    Heck of a deal right here. Only 2 of em left.

    I've got the 20" Alaskan model. Shot my whitetail with it this year using a 270 gr Hornady handload. Not much meat damage at all. One gun that I will never part with.
    LIVE TO HUNT....HUNT TO LIVE!!!!

  17. #17
    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    I have a Ruger Hawkeye Safari in .375 Ruger. I can't say enough good things about this rifle. I've had the stock bedded and a trigger job done and believe it or not, it will shoot nearly as well as my best varmint rifles. I load 270 grain Barnes TSX Flat Base bullets over 73.5 grains of RL15. I've carried a .338 Win Mag for years but the .375 is now my go-to rifle. I'm still looking forward to drawing a Delta bison permit and guarantee this rifle will accompany me on the hunt. That may be never, thirty-two years of applying and I'm still hoping. If not, the .375 will see a lot of action on future moose hunts.
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigswede358 View Post
    http://www.cdnnsports.com/375rug-hkm...tml#.VKHU-v8Dw

    Heck of a deal right here. Only 2 of em left.

    I've got the 20" Alaskan model. Shot my whitetail with it this year using a 270 gr Hornady handload. Not much meat damage at all. One gun that I will never part with.
    KOO'WELL.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug in Alaska View Post
    I have a Ruger Hawkeye Safari in .375 Ruger. I can't say enough good things about this rifle. I've had the stock bedded and a trigger job done and believe it or not, it will shoot nearly as well as my best varmint rifles. I load 270 grain Barnes TSX Flat Base bullets over 73.5 grains of RL15. I've carried a .338 Win Mag for years but the .375 is now my go-to rifle. I'm still looking forward to drawing a Delta bison permit and guarantee this rifle will accompany me on the hunt. That may be never, thirty-two years of applying and I'm still hoping. If not, the .375 will see a lot of action on future moose hunts.
    Reportedly, the Big Bores can be very accurate.

    One possible reason is that a small imperfection in a large bullet has less effect than on a smaller one. ????

    It sounds good anyway.

    Does your Ruger 375 kick LESS than your 338?

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Reportedly, the Big Bores can be very accurate.

    One possible reason is that a small imperfection in a large bullet has less effect than on a smaller one. ????

    It sounds good anyway.
    My only frame of reference is with cast bullets. And it's sure true there. Itty bitty .224 bullets are a PITA to cast unless you do everything exactly right. The smallest imperfection will open groups. Big old bullets for rounds like the 375 or 458 are a different story. Kinda fling the lead at the mold and stomp the bullet into the case, and it still wants to shoot one hole groups. I'm exaggerating about how easy it is to cast the big ones, of course, but they sure are a lot more tolerant of small flaws. I think you're right because the "sensitivity" to flaws changes as you run up and down the size scale. Most guys never get around to casting their own, but if you want to start, the first to try casting are your bigger calibers and not the smaller.

    I see it too, in casting bullets or round balls for my muzzleloaders. A .290 ball will get you holding your mouth just right, while you really have to mess up a .735 ball to see such big changes in accuracy. My reject rate at the melting pot goes right up as the balls/bullets get smaller and smaller.

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