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Thread: What mono for mooching?

  1. #1
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    Default What mono for mooching?

    Here is my question. For salmon primarily silvers and maybe a king or two what brand and weight mono do you use? We will be mooching out towards Montague. I plan on using braid with a leader. Any thoughts on the mono for the leader?

  2. #2
    Member Andy82Hoyt's Avatar
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    I have always used mono the whole way. However, I'm not the most experienced. I generally run 25# test for silver and 30# for kings. Mono give a better stretch for these fish than braid


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    We use #25 P-Line.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I use 30lb for my mooching leaders. Not brand specific, Berkeley, maxima, p line. Whatever is on sale.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    We use #25 P-Line.
    Same here on the P-Line leader and braid mainline when kings are likely. I use lighter rods with 15# or 20# mono (P-Line, too) on the reels when the silvers dominate.

    P-Line leader material has just the right stiffness, while most others are too soft. I vary breaking strength and hook size with the size of the herring. Basically the bigger the herring, the bigger the hooks and heavier the leader. I'm using 15# with green tray, 20# with red tray, 30# with blue tray and 40# with purple tray, whether cutplug or whole. Just a lot less tangling issues. The hook size is based on about 2/3 the width of the herring top to bottom right at the dorsal fin. That translates into 2/0 with green, 3/0 for red, 5/0 for blue and 7/0 for purple.

    Probably seems pretty fiddly to some folks, but it sure works for me.

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    Member Alan Sloka's Avatar
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    I'm not sure it has to be all that detailed but whatever works. All of the charters I have been on, and my own personal set up is 30#. I don't know of any charter that uses braid. I would think that with braid you would need a softer rod and have to be more careful with the drag to account for the lack of stretch. Personally, I use berkley Big Game and although I only make one trip to AK a year I put fresh on each year. Ten bucks worth of fresh line is a drop in the bucket when I'm spending 2 - 3 thousand a year for my trips. Each Charter has their own preference. Suffix and P-Line are both popular.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Sloka View Post
    ...a softer rod and have to be more careful with the drag to account for the lack of stretch....
    You got it. We're using both 10 1/2' and 12' rods for our king mooching. Silvers don't needs such horsepower, so we're using much lighter 9' rods there, along with the light mono.

    You got it on the price of line, too. I change mono twice per summer, and I cut off the first 50' of braid once a month.

    As for the different strength (stiffness) of leaders and hook sizes (weights), that has all to do with how we want herring to move in the water while mooching. There's a very particular action I look for, and to get it, the leaders and hooks make a big difference. We put in 100 days per summer on the water (300+ engine hours per year, so there's a lot of trolling going on, too), so we have plenty of opps for fine-tuning.

  8. #8
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    [. I'm using 15# with green tray, 20# with red tray, 30# with blue tray and 40# with purple tray, whether cutplug or whole.

    might be just me but the red trays I buy are usually smaller than the greens

    y'all are gonna laugh, but my trolling leaders are all 80# !
    I like to be a little stiffer than most

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by POLE BENDER View Post
    [. I'm using 15# with green tray, 20# with red tray, 30# with blue tray and 40# with purple tray, whether cutplug or whole.

    might be just me but the red trays I buy are usually smaller than the greens

    y'all are gonna laugh, but my trolling leaders are all 80# !
    I like to be a little stiffer than most
    Didn't realize I was color blind, but I must be! Yeah, I swapped greens and reds in my list.

    Funny thing, but I like 80# for trolling too.

  10. #10

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    For main line I use 14-17# Sufix mono. For leader 30-40# P-Line or Berkeley...I guess almost always 40#.

    Around Monty you can get into some fairly big Halibut and quite a few Lings by accident so bigger is usually better there.


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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    ...you can get into some fairly big Halibut and quite a few Lings by accident....
    I think you'll find that a pretty common denominator among trollers using heavier gear. We catch most of our kings in very shallow, close quarters with lots of barnacle covered rocks and kelp. All my trolling reels are loaded with 60# braid (with a 50' topshot of 50# PLine), along with those heavy 80# leaders. We use the same rods and lines for mooching, but lighter leaders for better mooching action, which for us starts in about 30' of open water at the shallowest, all the way out to 300'+. Silvers are so much smaller we get away with the lighter rods and 15# or 20# line too, even if we're fishing the same waters for them.

    Wanna have some real fun with both kings and silvers, ditch the mooching weights, and work your way along a kelp bed or reef. Go slow with frequent stops. Cast your mooch-rigged herring back into gaps and "coves" in the kelp or reef just like you would for largemouth bass or pike and let the herring slowly sink and flutter down right up close the cover. Wow.... Talk about effective and fun! It works so well and there's so much quiet stop and go, I'm seriously considering mounting an electric trolling motor up in the bow like bass boats.

    What's next, a pedestal seat in the bow?

  12. #12
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    I run 20lb mono, Maxima, Pline or Suffix on all my salmon rods, trolling and mooching, never had an issue.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post


    Wanna have some real fun with both kings and silvers, ditch the mooching weights, and work your way along a kelp bed or reef. Go slow with frequent stops. Cast your mooch-rigged herring back into gaps and "coves" in the kelp or reef just like you would for largemouth bass or pike and let the herring slowly sink and flutter down right up close the cover. Wow.... Talk about effective and fun! It works so well and there's so much quiet stop and go, I'm seriously considering mounting an electric trolling motor up in the bow like bass boats.

    What's next, a pedestal seat in the bow?
    now that sounds like FUN!!! unfortunatly there are not any places like that in cook inlet, though k-bay has a few, might have to try that some time soon.
    does anyone make a 40" shaft electric trolling motor??

  14. #14

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    There's a variation that's a whole lot of fun and really works. But it's best if you stop the boat and retrieve the gear to fight fish, rather than grinding on down the road with the other gear dangling while you deal with the fish.

    Keep a lighter rod handy and rigged with a spoon or mooch-rigged herring. Surprisingly often there will be an "extra" king or several swimming right with the one you've hooked. They ignore the other troll gear, mostly I think because in following the hooked fish, they've moved away from the other gear. A quick cast to the extra fish almost always produces an instant hookup, and on the lighter gear really turns into a brawl.

    It works for us because the first fish hooked is going to stay pretty close to the boat after you bring it to the boat the fist time, while that second fish is off to the races. That first trip up to the boat is when we see the extra fish. We stumbled on it with all our shallow water fishing. Sure we get the occasional double while trolling, but we get a whole lot more second hookups with the quick casts.

    One more note worth passing on. My wife and I tried it when we were by ourselves on the boat, and it pretty much turned into a cluster. We ran out of hands for fighting and landing two fish at once. But when we have extra folks onboard, the routine is for one to fight the fish, another to grab the net, and the third to be ready for the quick cast.

    BTW- It works really well while mooching too! Just be aware that the splash of a mooching weight on the cast is likely to spook the extra fish. Better to have a separate rod rigged and ready without a weight or with spoon only, rather than casting a mooching rig you've retrieved for the fight.

    Something to plug into your noggin as you dream about next spring's fishing!

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