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Thread: Trying to plan a move a couple years away

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    Default Trying to plan a move a couple years away

    my brain is fried, i have been researching and researching
    I am a junior in high school planing to move to Montana to work on a ranch. Then move to Alaska and i will be driving.
    what is the best time to move and are there any entry level jobs in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time jobs i like working with my hands and plan on applying for the electricians union in Fairbanks, but the requirement is you must live in Alaska for 1 year first before you may even apply.

    thanks

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    Former military here - try talking to a recruiter and find out if you can enlist with a guaranteed duty station in Alaska. Army and Air Force have bases in AK. That would give you some job training and a job for a few years while you see if you like AK.


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    Quote Originally Posted by dwm4375 View Post
    Former military here - try talking to a recruiter and find out if you can enlist with a guaranteed duty station in Alaska. Army and Air Force have bases in AK. That would give you some job training and a job for a few years while you see if you like AK.


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    Great advise. Check into combat engineer field. Might have electrician segment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak47nutter View Post
    my brain is fried, i have been researching and researching
    I am a junior in high school planing to move to Montana to work on a ranch. Then move to Alaska and i will be driving.
    what is the best time to move and are there any entry level jobs in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time jobs i like working with my hands and plan on applying for the electricians union in Fairbanks, but the requirement is you must live in Alaska for 1 year first before you may even apply.
    thanks
    There are ways to make the transition to a union apprenticeship easier and quicker. Give local 1547 IBEW in Anch or Fairbanks a call. Early efforts on your part can impress officials and give you a leg up on other applicants. Sometimes even eliminating waiting periods. Find and talk to those in the trade you seek to enter and start asking for advise and direction. Good luck on your quest.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    My dad is an electrician he has been explaining how the union and apprentice ship works
    thanks

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    Not really interested in the military but thanks

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    Talking ...in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time... (ha ha!)

    Cod is in the right ballpark. I spent years sitting on the committee that selects the apprentices for the IBEW in Alaska.
    After the year of residency, there will almost surely be another year of waiting. It is almost impossible to get in the apprenticeship on your first application. The number of applicants that we see up here is impressive. Some years we see over a hundred for very few slots. There are a lot of over qualified people also, including guys with multiple college degrees. Unless you are something special, you will not get in your first year. (the committee loves to see if you want it bad enough to keep trying)

    My advise to you is this. Join the union where you are as soon as you can.

    You have connections there and they can make the difference. I would also suggest that you look into being a lineman. We work outdoors in every part of the state. In all weather and terrain. We run heavy equipment and visit wild places. I have gotten to work in everything from a skiff to a helicopter and everything in between. Linemen are in high demand almost year around. We make more money and build a better pension. (Plus we are a tight knit bunch)

    Either way, once in the union apprenticeship, you can start the process of transferring your apprenticeship to Alaska. It is common for locals to allow apes to move. You may have to have a reason (sick Uncle needs help etc) but it gets you in here faster. If the local in your area is not putting apes to work, find a local nearby that is. Then transfer.

    If Montana is a must, then still start your apprenticeship where you can. (see if Montana is hiring) Take a year off (sometimes allowed w a reason) go to Montana then get back to work. Then transfer north. Once you get your lineman ticket, you can work almost anywhere in the states. Linemen are in demand world wide. It has been very good to me. It is a rough and dangerous trade, but it is not boring.

    Good luck and learn everything you can until you apply. Most of the above also applies to the electrician trade, but they go to work at the same place for months, inside work and lower pay. Zzzzzzzz.
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    my uncle is a lineman is the lineman apprenticeship also flooded.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Cod is in the right ballpark. I spent years sitting on the committee that selects the apprentices for the IBEW in Alaska.
    After the year of residency, there will almost surely be another year of waiting. It is almost impossible to get in the apprenticeship on your first application. The number of applicants that we see up here is impressive. Some years we see over a hundred for very few slots. There are a lot of over qualified people also, including guys with multiple college degrees. Unless you are something special, you will not get in your first year. (the committee loves to see if you want it bad enough to keep trying)

    My advise to you is this. Join the union where you are as soon as you can.

    You have connections there and they can make the difference. I would also suggest that you look into being a lineman. We work outdoors in every part of the state. In all weather and terrain. We run heavy equipment and visit wild places. I have gotten to work in everything from a skiff to a helicopter and everything in between. Linemen are in high demand almost year around. We make more money and build a better pension. (Plus we are a tight knit bunch)

    Either way, once in the union apprenticeship, you can start the process of transferring your apprenticeship to Alaska. It is common for locals to allow apes to move. You may have to have a reason (sick Uncle needs help etc) but it gets you in here faster. If the local in your area is not putting apes to work, find a local nearby that is. Then transfer.

    If Montana is a must, then still start your apprenticeship where you can. (see if Montana is hiring) Take a year off (sometimes allowed w a reason) go to Montana then get back to work. Then transfer north. Once you get your lineman ticket, you can work almost anywhere in the states. Linemen are in demand world wide. It has been very good to me. It is a rough and dangerous trade, but it is not boring.

    Good luck and learn everything you can until you apply. Most of the above also applies to the electrician trade, but they go to work at the same place for months, inside work and lower pay. Zzzzzzzz.
    You said a mouth full there. My son is a lineman and has worked in about every area of the state. They just got back right before Christmas from Buckland and will head to Stebbins on Jan. 5th. for 3-4 months. He loves the village work and is alway anxious to head to a new place.

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    The best time to move is when you have about $5,000 in your pocket and June is several weeks off. Living in your rig makes the money last.


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    Has anyone every mushed or has been a handler for sled dogs I have been trying to find out what jobs are available in fair banks or wasilla until I get into the apprentice ship that are not just for the summer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak47nutter View Post
    Has anyone every mushed or has been a handler for sled dogs I have been trying to find out what jobs are available in fair banks or wasilla until I get into the apprentice ship that are not just for the summer.
    It's possible you could find a gig working as a handler, sometimes for room/board. Watch the classifieds in the back of Mushing Magazine. Consider joining the Alaska Dog Mushers Association, and fishing around through the organization. Someone may put you in touch with someone who needs help.
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    For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

    I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

    Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by oakman View Post
    For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

    I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

    Good luck
    Thanks i did not know it would just be room and board

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    Quote Originally Posted by oakman View Post
    For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

    I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

    Good luck
    Ill look into that thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak47nutter View Post
    my uncle is a lineman is the lineman apprenticeship also flooded.
    All trades with a good base pay and pension are deluged with applicants. Don't let that stop you. Guys ARE getting in. Get in the trade where you are if possible, then transfer your apprenticeship. If you come to Alaska to apply, just be prepared to wait for a 2-3 year time period. Coming before the committee 3 times isn't easy, but they like the desire that you show.

    While waiting for my shot I pumped gas, worked room service at the Sheraton, plowed snow or whatever it took to survive. Finding a place to live on minimum wage will be one of your biggest challenges. Renting a room off of Craigs list may be an answer.

    Get on the phone, social media etc and find a local near you that might be hiring apes or groundsmen. There are no guarantees in life, but we can influence the outcome by persevering and being flexible. (Kinda like hunting) }:>

    It is a great way to see Alaska. Remote mancamps to village life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    All trades with a good base pay and pension are deluged with applicants. Don't let that stop you. Guys ARE getting in. Get in the trade where you are if possible, then transfer your apprenticeship. If you come to Alaska to apply, just be prepared to wait for a 2-3 year time period. Coming before the committee 3 times isn't easy, but they like the desire that you show.

    While waiting for my shot I pumped gas, worked room service at the Sheraton, plowed snow or whatever it took to survive. Finding a place to live on minimum wage will be one of your biggest challenges. Renting a room off of Craigs list may be an answer.

    Get on the phone, social media etc and find a local near you that might be hiring apes or groundsmen. There are no guarantees in life, but we can influence the outcome by persevering and being flexible. (Kinda like hunting) }:>

    It is a great way to see Alaska. Remote mancamps to village life.
    thanks i looked into being a labor a little bit and saw some dry cabins on craigslist also

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    One other thing that comes to mind. I have known a few that got in by taking a low paying position as a warehouse helper for a contractor. It allows you to join the union and that helps when you apply for the apprenticeship. I know one guy that got in thru a mechanics helper job at an electrical outfit.

    Sturgeon Elec., City Elec., Alcan Elec. Northern Powerline Const, all have busy warehouses. These positions start teaching you about the materials that are used in the trade. (Again, if you can find one close to home it gets your foot in the door)

    I have seen guys get in and then think the grass is greener on another job. Being an ape is tough, bookwork, you are at the beck and call of everyone above you and no choice where they send you. Too late they figure out they screwed up and try to come back into the trade. The committee usually figures they don't want it bad enough. Be prepared to sacrifice for those apprentice years. Good luck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    One other thing that comes to mind. I have known a few that got in by taking a low paying position as a warehouse helper for a contractor. It allows you to join the union and that helps when you apply for the apprenticeship. I know one guy that got in thru a mechanics helper job at an electrical outfit.

    Sturgeon Elec., City Elec., Alcan Elec. Northern Powerline Const, all have busy warehouses. These positions start teaching you about the materials that are used in the trade. (Again, if you can find one close to home it gets your foot in the door)

    I have seen guys get in and then think the grass is greener on another job. Being an ape is tough, bookwork, you are at the beck and call of everyone above you and no choice where they send you. Too late they figure out they screwed up and try to come back into the trade. The committee usually figures they don't want it bad enough. Be prepared to sacrifice for those apprentice years. Good luck.
    My dad said it is going to be tough,but I am willing to sacrifice a lot to get in and live in the land of the midnight sun.

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    Take Bullbusters advice. Don't come here with out a ticket. If the guy that sat on the app. committee telling you to get a foot in the door before you come up here maybe you should listen. The time you spend just trying to get a apprentice ship you can put that towards your actual journeymen's card. If its the outside lineman route you want to take go to a school. Its gives you a introduction to the trade but most importantly most of them have a job placement program. I was hired before I was out of the school. I went to Bismarck North Dakoda. There are several to choose from in different states. There is a reason why people that have experience are telling you the same thing.

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