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Thread: Lumber storage ideas

  1. #1

    Default Lumber storage ideas

    Well, it's almost time to start thinking about hauling in lumber and logs into my property. I have been thinking long and hard about how I want to do this. I'm a little unsure of my plan. Because I think it is probably realistic to think I will not be able to get all the lumber and logs out in one season, I am concerned about how to properly store my lumber to protect it from the elements. What I am thinking about is hauling the lumber and logs out in separate units, laying a large tarp down on the snow, laying the lumber on the tarps and wrapping the lumber up in the tarps. My concerns are #1, should I haul in a chainsaw and cut down trees for stickers to set the lumber on or is it even necessary? #2, should I try to cover logs with tarp from the top down or the bottom up and how will this be affected by snowmelt and rain leaking into the tarps? #3 how do I secure the tarps to the log or lumber so that the wind won't blow it off? So how about it, any suggestions? I am new to this hauling building materials. All the building I have done before SBS just offloaded the lumber right to the job site. Any advice from those with experience would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Store your lumber off the ground on cribbing, with stickers every several layers if applicable, and cover it to protect it from precip. It needs to have plenty of air circulation; do NOT wrap it up in tarps!! If you do so, you'll end up with a pile of damp, moldy, worthless lumber.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Store your lumber off the ground on cribbing, with stickers every several layers if applicable, and cover it to protect it from precip. It needs to have plenty of air circulation; do NOT wrap it up in tarps!! If you do so, you'll end up with a pile of damp, moldy, worthless lumber.
    Interesting. Thanks Taiga. I agree with what you are saying about the stickers, but I'm skeptical of not using any tarps at all. I can see that for certain things like 2 x 4's and 2 x 6's, but what about OSB and my logs? The rain would most likely make the OSB swell and the logs would start weathering from the sun.

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Store your lumber off the ground on cribbing, with stickers every several layers if applicable, and cover it to protect it from precip. It needs to have plenty of air circulation; do NOT wrap it up in tarps!! If you do so, you'll end up with a pile of damp, moldy, worthless lumber.
    Key word here......"WRAP". Do not WRAP your lumber. Cover.... yes. WRAP.... No.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Interesting. Thanks Taiga. I agree with what you are saying about the stickers, but I'm skeptical of not using any tarps at all. I can see that for certain things like 2 x 4's and 2 x 6's, but what about OSB and my logs? The rain would most likely make the OSB swell and the logs would start weathering from the sun.
    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    ....and cover it to protect it from precip.
    The last thing you want to do is wrap it up tho. You would regret that, guaranteed.

    First priority is to get it up off the ground and allow air to circulate underneath.
    Second priority is to cover is enough to protect it from precip.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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  6. #6

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    Good advice. Thanks guys.

  7. #7

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    As everyone has said you do not want to wrap the lumber by that you do not want to try to seal it up water and air tight. when you stack it up as you said cut some trees and make cribbing for it so that it is not on the ground.As stated put stickers in so that you have air flow through out. You could go to a saw mill and come up with stickers as they have a lot of scrap pieces and you could use these same type of wood to nail your tarp over the wood pile. You might even want to use two layers of the blue type of tarps as they get weathered from the sun. Remember cover well,do not enclose so that you do not good good air flow. Also when you start stacking up make sure that the wood does not have long spans where it can sag and warp.

  8. #8
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    You probably won't need stickers unless the lumber is green....although they do help keep the stack together if done carefully...cribbing or dunnage to keep the pile off the ground is pretty important. A few sacrificial sheets of osb and a good tarp over all should do the trick....I've kept stuff dry for years with a set up like that, in pretty wet conditions....
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Lay your lumber on wooden pallets. Make sure you have a fairly flat area as well to prevent warping as mentioned above. Longest stuff on bottom of pile fully supported, smaller stuff on top, then Windows and doors on top of that. Be sure to put some plywood over the final pieces to prevent anything from falling on the pile and smashing your glass pieces.
    Cover it as stated many times already but allow air flow into the pile.
    Thats what worked for us anyway.

    Also, do a snow dance would ya.....this warm weather needs to go!
    BK

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    You probably won't need stickers unless the lumber is green....although they do help keep the stack together if done carefully...cribbing or dunnage to keep the pile off the ground is pretty important. A few sacrificial sheets of osb and a good tarp over all should do the trick....I've kept stuff dry for years with a set up like that, in pretty wet conditions....
    I think that he is dealing with logs that were cut just this last summer. If they are damp or green he will need to sticker them top and bottom but keep them 1/2" to 1" apart on the sides to keep them from molding .

  11. #11

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    Thanks again guys. Great advice from all.

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    I bought a 20' conex. Put it on a skid on top of a trailer. Loaded the building materials in it. Hauled it to the end of the road and drug it off the trailer. Rented a dozer and towed the conex 5 miles down the frozen trail to my building site. Did some dozer work, and then took the dozer back. I now have a nice container at my cabin that I can secure things in since the building is up. It sure beat hauling building materials into the site in multiple trips.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I got an airless sprayer, used a good stain and pre stained all my lumber and logs at home. all sides coated. then stickered them in a pile, made a tent type cover for free air flow under the tarp, they lasted 2 winters till I got the cabin done. When I cut the lumber or logs, I just took a brush and sealed the fresh cut ends. This worked real well, It has been 5 years since I finished the cabin, the extra wood is still in the yard, covered, and I am using it on smaller projects all the time.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerberman View Post
    I got an airless sprayer, used a good stain and pre stained all my lumber and logs at home. all sides coated. then stickered them in a pile, made a tent type cover for free air flow under the tarp, they lasted 2 winters till I got the cabin done. When I cut the lumber or logs, I just took a brush and sealed the fresh cut ends. This worked real well, It has been 5 years since I finished the cabin, the extra wood is still in the yard, covered, and I am using it on smaller projects all the time.
    This is a really good idea. I think you are on to something. I might give this a try. Thanks.

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