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Thread: Banded ducks

  1. #1
    Member BLACKLABSOCIETY's Avatar
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    Default Banded ducks

    who has gotten banded birds and where. I have lived in dutch harbor for nine years and just got my 16th cell phone 12-4-14 159.jpgcell phone 12-4-14 159.jpghere today. a red breasted merganser and was banded in Feb 1 2007? this is the only place i have gotten birds with bands. i grew up in Palmer hunting out there. and never seen a banded bird till here in dutch.

  2. #2
    Member KenaiJay's Avatar
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    Just shot a banded Barrow's with a GPS transmitter and a banded hen Harlequin last weekend in Homer...Bling x2

  3. #3

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    I'm curious where the banded sea ducks are from - Can you tell us where they were banded? There is a big long-term study on Barrow's putting GPS transmitters out, and some banding of harlequins on Kodiak.

  4. #4
    Member BLACKLABSOCIETY's Avatar
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    all the ones i have gotten here in dutch harbor where banded on unalga island.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Northern Goshawk killed this one last week.



    Banded in Anchorage this Oct. This years bird.
    Live life and love it
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLACKLABSOCIETY View Post
    a red breasted merganser
    Let me get this straight.........you actually eat those things?

    I tried once.......no way, no how, ever again.........lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member BLACKLABSOCIETY's Avatar
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    dog eats them and also the teal and mallards that have fish eggs in there gullets

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    I've eaten plenty of ducks off of high salmon density areas.....golden eyes as well as about all the others.....including scoters (which were delicious). Mergansers were the only thing that I wouldn't shoot again. They were edible, but it was more the tough texture than it was the taste, but they were plenty muddy.....but not really fishy.

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    Member bkbaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Northern Goshawk killed this one last week.



    Banded in Anchorage this Oct. This years bird.
    What type of bird was banded?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkbaker View Post
    What type of bird was banded?
    Client shot a drake harlie, hoping to get some info on migratory harlies versus locals. But if was banded locally.

  11. #11
    Member KenaiJay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miller View Post
    I'm curious where the banded sea ducks are from - Can you tell us where they were banded? There is a big long-term study on Barrow's putting GPS transmitters out, and some banding of harlequins on Kodiak.
    Miller: Both were banded in Tutka Bay. Not far from where they were shot. I'm guessing they are year-round residents???

  12. #12
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    The only banded bird I have ever gotten was banded in the Minto flats and I shot it in the Bute sink near Sacramento.
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  13. #13

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    KenaiJay - Harlequins tend to have pretty high site fidelity (they return to the same place in subsequent years). Most sea ducks are banded during the flightless molt period on specific sites where they raft up in mid-summer after breeding (especially males). Harlequins breed along fast-moving streams, which can be very close to the coast or far inland (some birds which winter along the Washington and BC coasts breed in eastern Idaho). Most banding takes place in Kachemak Bay, on Kodiak, or in Prince William Sound, and few birds have been recovered in different areas than where they were banded. So, long story short, they could have been local breeders, or they could have just been coming back to the same place as in previous years (their molt or wintering sites). Awesome that you got into them, though!

  14. #14
    Member jerryl's Avatar
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    image.jpgShot this cackler goose in nome September was banded in Bacholer Washington 3/28/2012
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    Quite a few banded birds out there, but banding effort and migration patterns of banded birds are uneven--so Dutch is an interesting deal! In general, 1000s of dabblers are banded across North America to maintain historic info on derivation and distribution of harvest, estimates of survival rates, and special studies. In Alaska, dabblers are mainly banded by USFWS and ADFG at a few locations where birds are likely to go to the Pacific and Central Flyways.

    Goose banding is largely to support studies of harvest and survival for particular populations--cacklers, brant, dusky Canadas--including colored leg and neck bands for re-sighting studies down south. Banding on the breeding grounds during summer is most valuable, but some geese are also marked in WA, OR, and CA during winter to increase the marked sample or track local movements.


    In general, there are few sea ducks banded because historic efforts have been sparse--they are hard to catch--and recent banding is focused on a few species and locations. For example, the Exxon Valdez spill prompted banding of harlequins and scoters, and these efforts were expanded through the Sea Duck Joint Venture to band and radio sea ducks from Alaska to Mexico and Russia. Still, very few birds with fewer hunters and scarce band recoveries. Though most birds tend to be faithful to particular breeding, molting and wintering areas, they do move around and redistribute with mates selected in winter--so no major conclusions can be made without reviewing the databases.


    Banding and marking are very valuable management tools, so PLESASE REPORT ALL MARKED BIRDS. It is not illegal to shoot banded birds--and you get to keep the bling--but USFWS, USGS, and ADFG would probably be very grateful to get expensive radios back. They are glad to share info on where that bird was banded and its tracks across time!

    Tom R. - ADFG Waterfowl, retired (sort of)

  16. #16
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkbaker View Post
    What type of bird was banded?
    This was a hen mallard.
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