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Thread: What Camera do you use?

  1. #1
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default What Camera do you use?

    With the new digital cameras that are coming out what is your prefence for certain pictures?

    Just fishing for details before I buy my next one, thanks.

  2. #2

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    Not to be a pain...but to give any useful feedback I would need to know more about what your specific interests are. Do you want something that will point and shoot and fit in a shirt pocket? Do you want something that will make photos that look nice on a laptop monitor and maybe 7" prints or something that can put out a tack sharp 40x60" poster no matter how heavy or bulky? And do you want to have something that allows you to manually set every detail and learn how to do so?

    Those sorts of details might at least help identify roughly what sort of answer is appropriate.

    While you are considering that...a couple thoughts.
    1. Any camera, no matter how poor, can be used by a skilled and creative photographer to take outstanding photos.

    2. The camera you have with you when you want to take a photo is the best camera you own. This is why smartphones are awesome cameras...they are available.

    And finally...the music analogy of your question is...what piano should I buy if I want to play like Beethoven? I don't mean that in a snarky way...but sometimes people really do think cameras make good photos. They don't. Photographers do.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    Not to be a pain...but to give any useful feedback I would need to know more about what your specific interests are. Do you want something that will point and shoot and fit in a shirt pocket? Do you want something that will make photos that look nice on a laptop monitor and maybe 7" prints or something that can put out a tack sharp 40x60" poster no matter how heavy or bulky? And do you want to have something that allows you to manually set every detail and learn how to do so?

    Those sorts of details might at least help identify roughly what sort of answer is appropriate.

    While you are considering that...a couple thoughts.
    1. Any camera, no matter how poor, can be used by a skilled and creative photographer to take outstanding photos.

    2. The camera you have with you when you want to take a photo is the best camera you own. This is why smartphones are awesome cameras...they are available.

    And finally...the music analogy of your question is...what piano should I buy if I want to play like Beethoven? I don't mean that in a snarky way...but sometimes people really do think cameras make good photos. They don't. Photographers do.
    Quite the post Troy, lol.

    Was wondering about the long range DSLR for outdoor shots.

  4. #4

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    Any DSLR will do that. Primary question is how much lens you want to carry. Pros carry big lenses for a reason...assuming you are intending to take wildlife shots? The real investment is the lens. Buy the lens you want and if you are broke afterward, get the cheapest body that fits it. If you aren't broke get a nicer one. I prefer Nikon but that is like Ford versus Chevy...most important is to stay within your budget so you can afford to use it.

    I also prefer full frame, but if you are looking for long range then the crop format (APS-C) cameras get you more telephoto effect.

    So...if I were shopping I would get the nicest 300 f4 or 400 f5.6 I could find and stick the cheapest Nikon camera I could find behind it. If I were shopping with a lot of money, that lens would be a 400 f2.8...

    If you intend to haul these around while hunting, probably not something that will seem like a good idea after a few trips.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    Any DSLR will do that. Primary question is how much lens you want to carry. Pros carry big lenses for a reason...assuming you are intending to take wildlife shots? The real investment is the lens. Buy the lens you want and if you are broke afterward, get the cheapest body that fits it. If you aren't broke get a nicer one. I prefer Nikon but that is like Ford versus Chevy...most important is to stay within your budget so you can afford to use it.

    I also prefer full frame, but if you are looking for long range then the crop format (APS-C) cameras get you more telephoto effect.

    So...if I were shopping I would get the nicest 300 f4 or 400 f5.6 I could find and stick the cheapest Nikon camera I could find behind it. If I were shopping with a lot of money, that lens would be a 400 f2.8...

    If you intend to haul these around while hunting, probably not something that will seem like a good idea after a few trips.
    Just looking for a base with a 55-200mm lens, that would work for me right now.

    http://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=869641

    Found this forum and was just wondering what people in alaska use that works best for them. ( battery, fogging,etc.)

  6. #6

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    Ahh...

    I have not had trouble with any, but I do take care of my equipment. Best thing you can do for battery is keep the flash off and make sure you always leave with full charge and a spare batt...

    Good luck. Others may have had fogging issues to share, I have not had that problem.
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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Troy, interesting take. Now you have me thinking. The maze of available models is keeping me from making a move.

    If the body is a moot point...

    Any benefits buying new over used?

    How do I know what lens(es) I want? (brands to avoid or steer towards, obsolete..)
    I could see wanting to pull an animal in from 100 yards. Birds to 50 yards.
    I would also take landscape shots.
    I would take micro shots of bugs or flowers etc.

    Thanks In Advance for any advice that you share. }:>

    Oh, I currently shoot a Pentax Optio W60, point and shoot. Have dim memory of high school photography class. Recently finding myself having time for old hobbies again.

    The end use would probably just remain computer viewing, social media, forums, emails etc. I may want to have some printed to hang on the wall.
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  8. #8

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    The only benefits of a new body are the warranty and the latest and greatest-ness of them.

    If you are looking to get back into photography, and have not done it for a while beyond point and shoot level, a good solid body that allows manual settings is the best option. For birds and wildlife, a finder is definitely good so the DSLR or at least the DSLR-style bodies are better suited to that use. Unless you get an 800 mm lens, most bird photography is done much closer than 50 yards. The biggest secret in wildlife photography is no secret...get closer. That becomes a problem because people stick a camera in front of their nose and forget that the animal they are sneaking up on is a BEAR, or a MOOSE...bad idea really, but it gets ingrained because that is how you get a better photo.

    The real fundamental shopping strategy for you is set by your budget. Zoom lenses are popular, common, and generally cheap. If you really want to stretch yourself and make an investment in glass that you might keep longer-term, the cheap zooms are not the answer though. They just aren't as good as the prime lenses or the really expensive zooms.

    I would have to know your budget to know how I would shop in your instance, but in general from what you say I would start with either a 300 f4 or a 400 f5.6 lens if available, and I would get them from either the main manufacturer (Nikon, Canon, Sony, Panasonic...I'm sure I'm forgetting one I should remember...) or from Sigma, Tamron, or Tokina. I would get a body that fits the lens, and I would get the body either used or refurbished. Refurbished has the benefit of having its issues dealt with and often has a warranty but you aren't paying new price.

    You are going to want a lens that covers somewhere in the 20 to 100 range, or a couple lenses in that range, for when you aren't trying to get animals.

    After a couple years, you should know whether you want more camera, more lens, or both, if you've put in the time to figure out how to use them well.

    And finally, if you really want to learn photography, you need to commit to manual settings, using raw development software, and making your own JPEGs from the RAW files. If you shoot automatic settings or JPEGs, your camera fixes your mistakes as well as its own, and it makes it harder to fully understand the effect of photographic options on the final result. This is the equivalent of committing to doing your own darkroom work in the old days. People can take fine photographs without this step, but if you really want to be the master of the medium, this is part of the apprenticeship...
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  9. #9

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    Also noticed you want landscape...you will need a lens in the 20-40 range for that, and if you want macro you will be happiest with a macro lens. This is a pretty cohesive set of lenses. The lenses are the real commitment financially. You can replace the body when you want anytime, but there is a lot of money in good lenses. Unless you are wealthy, you will end up either spending a lot of money, which will commit you to a lens mount (though many of the new mirrorless cameras from Sony or Samsung etc. can use other lenses via adapters, though often without autofocus function) or you will settle for some lenses that are not very stellar in order to fill out the range without going broke.

    Honestly, I am primarily a landscape shooter at this point, and I use a Samsung NX100 I got a few years back for shooting out of a plane. I got that camera because I wanted the lens, the 30 mm f2 lens from Samsung was highly regarded and incredibly compact, so I got the body that I could stick on it.

    If I was buying for wildlife, I would get a true DSLR from Nikon, because I have a bunch of Nikon glass and because I live with somebody that has another brand and the Nikons I have from film days are so much more durable and robust than the other brands of DSLRs I have handled. But it is primarily about the glass. If I had a bunch of Canon lenses I would be figuring out how to buy Canon.

    I know a bunch of folks that have switched out camera systems lenses and all. They are quite well-off. Not a decision to be made lightly.

    Probably best to start with just a couple lenses and go from there.
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  10. #10
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Talking Great response!

    Troy,
    Thank-you for taking the time to give me so much information.

    I cannot comment right now as I am on my first cup o joe. That is the type of answer I was hoping for.

    Rep sent!
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  11. #11

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    You're welcome.

    One other thing...the 300 f4 or 400 f5.6 can be hard to find or expensive...though a lot less than the monster lenses the pros lug around.

    If you are really wanting to dip your toe in at lower cost, but want wildlife to be a main focus, the 70-300 zooms are pretty okay. Whatever you do, if you want wildlife your really do want something that goes at least to 300. And teleconverters are really not an option you will be happy with unless you start with a really big expensive lens...for a lot of reasons. Just adding that in case some salesman tries to tell you to get a teleconverter to make your 50-200 into a 100-300...don't do it. Get the 100-300 in the first place.
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    Good info Troy, thanks

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    http://www.qvc.com/qvc.product.E2268...628&cadevice=c

    Just bought this one, I think it will work for what I want.

  14. #14

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    Excellent...have fun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    Excellent...have fun.
    Thanks, I know it is'nt the top of the line, but it was at the top of my buget for spending on a camera at this time. ( I wish I had $5000.00 to get a good rig.)

  16. #16

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    As I said before...what is most important is you...the photographer. That kit has a lot of potential and gives you more than enough capability to learn how to do any of the things that will get you the images you want.
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