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Thread: is COAL in 50# Bags.....or other size lot. Available Anch. area.....????

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    Default is COAL in 50# Bags.....or other size lot. Available Anch. area.....????

    I have asked this before, and got answers like walk the RR tracks. Is there anyplace in south central Alaska that sells coal as a heat source....??? Do residents around Healy, AK. burn coal ??? It seems like there would be a market for coal, given that most of what we use for firewood sucks.

    Can you buy coal at retail in Healy, Alaska......???

    Thanks

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I have asked this before, and got answers like walk the RR tracks. Is there anyplace in south central Alaska that sells coal as a heat source....??? Do residents around Healy, AK. burn coal ??? It seems like there would be a market for coal, given that most of what we use for firewood sucks.

    Can you buy coal at retail in Healy, Alaska......???

    Thanks
    Years ago I seem to remember some guys selling coal out of their truck down here on the Kenai, but other than that I've never seen it sold like at a store or anything. But I have to ask what are you burning that you think sucks? I've always really liked the combination of beetle killed spruce and birch in the stove.....
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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Here is one of a few listed when I did a search. http://www.akcozycoal.com/purchasecoal.html
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    Well relative to true hardwoods Alaska's hardest wood being white or black birch is not even close to the same class as true hardwoods. Around here and on my land it is 45% Hemlock, 40% Spruce, 4% Birch, 1% Cottonwood. I never mess with Cottonwood as it is a classic widow'maker.

    I am thinking more along the line of hoarding coal and building a reserve for when I am 80 y/o. Coal would be lighter and easier to handle.

    I would think some feed/farm type store in Seward could buy a few box cars full of 50# bags of coal for retail. Should there ever be a serious SHTF event effecting me, I want a hundred ways to make heat. I now have wood stoves, stove oil stoves (Both drip and Toyo type) Propane heat stoves, and Electric heaters.......

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    We used to buy coal in 50# sacks from a guy in Palmer. I think he got it from the Sutton area. Been around for years. If I come across his number I will post it.

    http://southcentralcoalsales.com/ is not the guy, but looks legit.

    Another one (in Seward I think)
    Coal is available on normal business days. At the AKRR yard operated by Aurora energy services. Phone number is (907)244-3120. The cost is $80/ton. If you have another reason to come down that negates alot of your transportation cost. I would recommend picking up a load anytime you are down there. Being only 120 miles from anchorage the round trip is less then one way to Healy.
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    Thank You, I am the 65 miles from Seward. Very helpful post, thanks.



    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    We used to buy coal in 50# sacks from a guy in Palmer. I think he got it from the Sutton area. Been around for years. If I come across his number I will post it.

    http://southcentralcoalsales.com/ is not the guy, but looks legit.

    Another one (in Seward I think)
    Coal is available on normal business days. At the AKRR yard operated by Aurora energy services. Phone number is (907)244-3120. The cost is $80/ton. If you have another reason to come down that negates alot of your transportation cost. I would recommend picking up a load anytime you are down there. Being only 120 miles from anchorage the round trip is less then one way to Healy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Well relative to true hardwoods Alaska's hardest wood being white or black birch is not even close to the same class as true hardwoods. Around here and on my land it is 45% Hemlock, 40% Spruce, 4% Birch, 1% Cottonwood. I never mess with Cottonwood as it is a classic widow'maker.

    I am thinking more along the line of hoarding coal and building a reserve for when I am 80 y/o. Coal would be lighter and easier to handle.

    I would think some feed/farm type store in Seward could buy a few box cars full of 50# bags of coal for retail. Should there ever be a serious SHTF event effecting me, I want a hundred ways to make heat. I now have wood stoves, stove oil stoves (Both drip and Toyo type) Propane heat stoves, and Electric heaters.......
    Yes, I realize birch isn't like oak but for what we got I don't think it's have bad. Oh, and I'm sure you have burned coal before so I don't have to remind you.........a REALLY GOOD air tight is REALLY recommended. That was close to 30 years ago and I still remember that stink........(might as well be in the house inhaling diesel exhaust)
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    I purchase coal from Jay @ south central coal at 715-7790.
    He has 50# bags and bulk in his yard and does deliver bulk.
    Last time I bought it was 7.50 /bag.
    He is in Butte.

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    I burn coal in a blaze king-princess stove and love it. I start a fire with wood then pour the coal to it. I have fire brick all the way up the sides of my stove, it is not recommended to burn coal against steel.
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    Its Subbituminous Ccoal from Usibelli coal mines, 7,800 BTU per pound. This is the number of the guy 715-7790 I have bought from him in the past but don't remember his name. This coal does not store for along time very well, Subbituminous is not a very good coal but its the best that AK has. It will dry out if exposed to the elements for very long and when it does it will crumble to dust.
    Keep in mind even though folks can burn anything in the wood stove most wood stoves are not designed to burn coal. Coal needs a shaker grate to burn the best and the steel is generally a heavier grade steel to handle the higher heat level. I happen to have a Harman wood /coal stove that I brought up when I moved to AK this was a stove I use to sell in my business in CO. If you keep the coal in the dark or covered it should last longer I keep my coal in a large covered box and it has lasted for over 3 years now and is still good to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    Its Subbituminous Ccoal from Usibelli coal mines, 7,800 BTU per pound. This is the number of the guy 715-7790 I have bought from him in the past but don't remember his name. This coal does not store for along time very well, Subbituminous is not a very good coal but its the best that AK has. It will dry out if exposed to the elements for very long and when it does it will crumble to dust.
    Keep in mind even though folks can burn anything in the wood stove most wood stoves are not designed to burn coal. Coal needs a shaker grate to burn the best and the steel is generally a heavier grade steel to handle the higher heat level. I happen to have a Harman wood /coal stove that I brought up when I moved to AK this was a stove I use to sell in my business in CO. If you keep the coal in the dark or covered it should last longer I keep my coal in a large covered box and it has lasted for over 3 years now and is still good to go.
    How do you compare the Harman stove with a Blaze King........price, quality, efficiency, etc...? I'd love to find something towards the quality of a Blaze King without having to spend a fortune. Will probably only keep a fire going when it gets really cold to help out on the gas bill......
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    You can buy coal here in Seward at the ship loading terminal. Last winter it was $80-85 a ton which is about a full pickup truck load. Just bring your truck or trailer down and they will load you up. Best to call first and make sure they have someone available to load you, need the number let me know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    How do you compare the Harman stove with a Blaze King........price, quality, efficiency, etc...? I'd love to find something towards the quality of a Blaze King without having to spend a fortune. Will probably only keep a fire going when it gets really cold to help out on the gas bill......
    I have sold the whole Harman line when I was in business: wood, coal, wood/coal, pellet and gas. Without going to there history of the stove and family I found them to be very well made and the origin was form building coal stoves. Coal stoves have to be heavier than wood to handle higher heat levels.

    Every state is a bit diff when it comes to stoves, Blaze king was not very popular in CO because of the catalytic converter and the higher altitudes. I sure cleaned a lot of them in my business but along with Vermont Casting and VC had the same problem with there catalytic converter. So to sum up your question to what is a better stove? if your BK is a cat stove then of course I will say the Harman is a better stove... if it does not have the cat then they are pretty even. As long as you are burning wood. if you want a wood / coal stove then go with Harman. I do not know is BK is making a dual stove now or not.
    Price wise I don't know what BK is selling for up here and not sure where a Harman dealer is in AK

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I have asked this before, and got answers like walk the RR tracks. Is there anyplace in south central Alaska that sells coal as a heat source....??? Do residents around Healy, AK. burn coal ??? It seems like there would be a market for coal, given that most of what we use for firewood sucks.

    Can you buy coal at retail in Healy, Alaska......???

    Thanks
    Yes to healy coal. Most the fellas I know there burn it. Friend there gets it by truckload. Can't remember price but if u really want I can find out. Just pm.
    It was silly cheap tho.

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    Shoot if there's a market I'll bring truckload down.
    But at $85 out of Seward it'd be cheaper at Seward in end I bet

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    The size coal out of Seward is ground down much smaller than the coal out of Palmer.

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    They sell them at the gas station in Trapper Creek. Don't remember the price though.

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    I've seen coal just sitting on or right below the surface in a few areas I've hunted a shovel and some feed sacks would work just fine in those areas probably for an easier day than hand splitting firewood. That is if you want stick back a little at a time, in bulk a truck load at a time is the only way to go.

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    What about pellets? It might be more money but they seem to be easy to manage. You could have a few pallets if you're stockpiling.
    My grandfather is 86 and still heats his home with wood, being in Idaho his winters are milder than here. Last year he finally bought a hydraulic splitter.
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    Good for your Grandfather. I have learned a lot from this thread about coal. And I don't think I will buy any coal. I thought it lasted forever, now hearing that it decomposes, I have lost interest. But I want to thank everyone who has helped educate me about coal in this thread. I now think I will go with propane for long term emergency storage.


    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    What about pellets? It might be more money but they seem to be easy to manage. You could have a few pallets if you're stockpiling.
    My grandfather is 86 and still heats his home with wood, being in Idaho his winters are milder than here. Last year he finally bought a hydraulic splitter.

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