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Thread: Bears

  1. #1
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    Default Bears

    I was out checking traps today and this is what i found weird weather has them messed up also
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  2. #2

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    I see claw marks. Looks like a brownie. No surprise they're out roaming around with the recent temps and lack of snow

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    In recent years, it hasn't been uncommon to see bears running around well into December. This lack of snow and warm weather isn't helping anything this year for sure.

  4. #4

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    Judging from the with of your boot not a huge grizzly, but clearly a grizzly. I have been looking everyday expecting to see a bear or tracks, but I have not seen any bears or sign for the last month. And we have zero snow on the ground. The snow seems to start at about 2,000' ASL.

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    My wife was telling me that the neighbor saw a brown bear in the middle of the road two weeks ago today. Luckily none have ventured into the neighborhood yet, but I expect that soon enough. I figure the brownie was getting some easy meals off the trap lines in the area she saw him at.

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    I have seen bear tracks on the pipe line in gray Cliff in January where they walked for miles down the pipeline for no apparent reason.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Seemingly "weird" weather, but we moved up here in '85. I spent many days in November and early December, between '85 and '95, hunting rabbits in snowless woods in the Mat-Su valley. This winter has been no different so far.

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    Found an occupied den last Saturday with fresh tracks in the snow leading out and leading right back in. After an extensive debate we decided not to mess with it and come back in a couple weeks after some cold and he's a little more sleepy.

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    Here in Southeast it's not uncommon at all to see brown bears in November and December. Buddies are still seeing them deer hunting pretty regularly. Some of the bears down here never end up hibernating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullcephous View Post
    Found an occupied den last Saturday with fresh tracks in the snow leading out and leading right back in. After an extensive debate we decided not to mess with it and come back in a couple weeks after some cold and he's a little more sleepy.
    Do you know what type of bear is in the den? The reason for the question is grizzly have been knows to attack people who disturb them in a den. Black bears are not as aggressive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Do you know what type of bear is in the den?
    I wouldn't doubt this guy knows not only what type of bear it is, but weather or not it's a sow or boar, how big it is, or if it's got bad teeth or not.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I wouldn't doubt this guy knows not only what type of bear it is, but weather or not it's a sow or boar, how big it is, or if it's got bad teeth or not.......
    I know nothing about the person and he said very little about the bear or what he knows about bears. So forgive me for trying to give him some advice that might keep him from getting hurt.

    As far as him knowing if the bear is a sow or boar, how big it is, or if it's got bad teeth or not........ is asking a lot of any person.

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    What's it's favorite kind of pie?

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    Yeah i would not recommend messing with a bear in the den you might get alot more than you bargain for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I know nothing about the person and he said very little about the bear or what he knows about bears. So forgive me for trying to give him some advice that might keep him from getting hurt.

    As far as him knowing if the bear is a sow or boar, how big it is, or if it's got bad teeth or not........ is asking a lot of any person.
    Jeeze guy....lighten up, I was "trying" to be sarcastic.

    Guess it didn't work.........
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike h View Post
    What's it's favorite kind of pie?
    Being a bear and all, probably the hairy kind.

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    Dang! gang up on the old guy 4mer guide! Ha ha, you guys with sheep avatars are some real ball busters! I just joined the forum and you guys sure have been giving me a hard time. Elder abuse!! Instead of 4mer guide you should call yourself "current *****hole!" (Just kidding guy, you dish it out I hope you can take it! Ha ha! Nice ram you got there by the way. What a beaut! I like the pose too.
    The bear is dead and it was a young 7 foot boar killed right outside the den with a markii 30.06. One 180 grain Accubond in the neck and one through the shoulder blade was enough. Teeth were great, no breaks and very little wear. Bear was young but very fat. After skinning, me and the nephew were surprised to find what looked like a hernia. Intestines were pushing out from the lower belly and healed over with scar tissue and fat. Looked pretty painful. No scarring on the outer hide to indicate a puncture wound or previous injury. Never seen that before. The bear was brown and the den was empty and clean. There were 2 other half dug abandoned holes in the immediate vicinity and it looked like he gave up digging both and settled for his current hole right smack in the middle of a draw in the tundra at the base of a willow bush. There was a pile of dirt outside the hole about 4 feet high and 10ft wide. The hole was about twice as big around as my 34" waist and went back about 10 feet underneath the willows root system with a slight turn to the right with a small dug out bed. The Intestines were packed like an over stuffed sausage with twigs and grass. The bear was not asleep as there were fresh tracks in the snow close to his den. yes there was some risk involved as there always is when a bear is close. When den hunting we always do as dad taught us. Lots of ways to do it I suppose but dad's way has always worked for us. One hunter is in position above the hole the other hunter should be perpendicular to the hole on the downhill and downwind side. Uphill hunter pounds on the roof of the den with the butt of a spear, rocks or sticks. Anything that will make a vibration very near the entrance to the hole. Brown bears don't always come out right away and it may take some persistence. Before they come out they almost always let out a big blow of air like a sneeze accompanied by a woof or growl. So it's important to be listening closely for this sound. I have yet to not hear a denned bear make this noise upon announcing its exit. Sometimes the sound is very faint as it can be muffled by feet of snow and dirt. After they sneeze the hunter on the downhill must be ready for the bear to explode out of the den at any second. And they really can explode out of there. Like shot out of a cannon. It's important the hunter stays calm as the bear spins to see what's above the hole. Most times the bear will turn and circle to it's left, not sure why but they usually do for us. When the bear turns it's important for the shooter to maintain composure and make a well placed shot being aware at all times the location of his hunting partner. Sometimes the bear will run straight out of the hole and try to escape but stop to look back. Sometimes it will poke its head out usually to the chest or hump and look around. Sometimes it will turn and fight. It is up to the shooter to adapt to the situation and make a well placed shot. Not a science but it's done often by folks around here.

    Although Ive never done it, I've personally seen bears killed with head shots from a .223 at these close distances. No not an AR, just an old model .700.

  18. #18
    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullcephous View Post
    Dang! gang up on the old guy 4mer guide! Ha ha, you guys with sheep avatars are some real ball busters! I just joined the forum and you guys sure have been giving me a hard time. Elder abuse!! Instead of 4mer guide you should call yourself "current *****hole!" (Just kidding guy, you dish it out I hope you can take it! Ha ha! Nice ram you got there by the way. What a beaut! I like the pose too.
    The bear is dead and it was a young 7 foot boar killed right outside the den with a markii 30.06. One 180 grain Accubond in the neck and one through the shoulder blade was enough. Teeth were great, no breaks and very little wear. Bear was young but very fat. After skinning, me and the nephew were surprised to find what looked like a hernia. Intestines were pushing out from the lower belly and healed over with scar tissue and fat. Looked pretty painful. No scarring on the outer hide to indicate a puncture wound or previous injury. Never seen that before. The bear was brown and the den was empty and clean. There were 2 other half dug abandoned holes in the immediate vicinity and it looked like he gave up digging both and settled for his current hole right smack in the middle of a draw in the tundra at the base of a willow bush. There was a pile of dirt outside the hole about 4 feet high and 10ft wide. The hole was about twice as big around as my 34" waist and went back about 10 feet underneath the willows root system with a slight turn to the right with a small dug out bed. The Intestines were packed like an over stuffed sausage with twigs and grass. The bear was not asleep as there were fresh tracks in the snow close to his den. yes there was some risk involved as there always is when a bear is close. When den hunting we always do as dad taught us. Lots of ways to do it I suppose but dad's way has always worked for us. One hunter is in position above the hole the other hunter should be perpendicular to the hole on the downhill and downwind side. Uphill hunter pounds on the roof of the den with the butt of a spear, rocks or sticks. Anything that will make a vibration very near the entrance to the hole. Brown bears don't always come out right away and it may take some persistence. Before they come out they almost always let out a big blow of air like a sneeze accompanied by a woof or growl. So it's important to be listening closely for this sound. I have yet to not hear a denned bear make this noise upon announcing its exit. Sometimes the sound is very faint as it can be muffled by feet of snow and dirt. After they sneeze the hunter on the downhill must be ready for the bear to explode out of the den at any second. And they really can explode out of there. Like shot out of a cannon. It's important the hunter stays calm as the bear spins to see what's above the hole. Most times the bear will turn and circle to it's left, not sure why but they usually do for us. When the bear turns it's important for the shooter to maintain composure and make a well placed shot being aware at all times the location of his hunting partner. Sometimes the bear will run straight out of the hole and try to escape but stop to look back. Sometimes it will poke its head out usually to the chest or hump and look around. Sometimes it will turn and fight. It is up to the shooter to adapt to the situation and make a well placed shot. Not a science but it's done often by folks around here.

    Although Ive never done it, I've personally seen bears killed with head shots from a .223 at these close distances. No not an AR, just an old model .700.
    Just Awesome! What part of the state?

  19. #19
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
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    I would love to see pics if you managed to get any! I've seen dens from a ways off, but never actually entered one before.
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGAKSTUFF View Post
    I would love to see pics if you managed to get any! I've seen dens from a ways off, but never actually entered one before.
    I occasionally find dens near my cabin in Gray Cliff. It's on high, dry ground. I have crawled down into a couple of them to check them out. Not while the bears were in them though.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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