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Thread: "I am moving to Alaska wilderness, and live off the land"

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    Default "I am moving to Alaska wilderness, and live off the land"

    "I am moving to Alaska wilderness, and live off the land"


    by Sourdough
    , 12-25-2009 at 12:01 PM (22022 Views)

    After 45 years in Alaska, much of it remote, I give the following advise to those who dream of: Living alone in the wilderness off the land.

    Study: Read everything you can find written FIRST Person, by those who did it in 1886 to 1936. Spend one year reading, studying, and get a good magnifying glass with which to study photographs of the period. Make notes, what did they wear, what tools are present, how did they feed the dog team, how many ways too build a cache, etc..

    The good news is that much was recorded by survey parties, and Federal Judges, Missionaries, and a few educated prospectors.
    It is doable, but the physical pain and suffering, the mental anguish will be beyond anything you can currently comprehend. However the reward, even if you fail, will be beyond anything you can currently comprehend.
    The key is to study those who really did it.

  2. #2
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    You're never going to make it.

  3. #3

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    It is far more important in life to attempt to fulfill ones dream, than to have the failure to attempt weigh on you later in life. A man who fails at his dream is richer than the man who never even tried.

    QUOTE=mike h;1440242]You're never going to make it.[/QUOTE]

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    One of my all time favorites................Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.Theodore Roosevelt



  5. #5
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    What gets me is so many people read One mans wilderness and watch the Kilchers among others on (un)reality TV and think it's a wonderful life.
    Little do they know Dick Proenekke was a very special kind of person with the skills to build/repair virtually anything. He is not the norm and he lived in a time when building a squatters cabin was still accceptable. He also received inexpensive flying services from Babe Alsworth for mail and groceries which I'm sure was a big help to him.
    The Kilchers are on an (Un)reality show and can drive to town from their house.They are not true bush dwellers in any sense.
    but people see these guys on TV and in books and think it is an easy and cheap lifestyle.
    I live here in AK and I'm not sure I have the skills needed to live that kind of lifestyle. But I have a general idea of how those true subsistence people live and I know I am not currently cut out for that lifestyle and am willing to admit it.
    I think it can certainly be done. But I also think people should vacation here first and get some idea of how wilderness living goes and how much it cost before fling up and setting out for their dream lifestyle.
    Just because you made it in a dry cabin the lesser 48 doesn't mean you can make it in the bush.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Living off the land? Pretty soon the land don't taste so good!
    Tim

  7. #7

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    It still tastes a helluva lot better than punching a time clock for forty years.

    Quote Originally Posted by mit View Post
    Living off the land? Pretty soon the land don't taste so good!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    It still tastes a helluva lot better than punching a time clock for forty years.
    After punching the time clock for forty years, you should have enough money to live off the land!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    A single guy with decent wilderness skills could still do it. You would need to have a big initial cash outlay. You would need to have minimal obligations. You would need connections, but it is still possible. L48ers... please disregard.

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    A single guy with decent wilderness skills could still do it. You would need to have a big initial cash outlay. You would need to have minimal obligations. You would need connections, but it is still possible. L48ers... please disregard.
    It's expensive these days to live off the land!
    Tim

  11. #11
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    Gigantic difference between 'living off the grid' and 'living off the land'. No comparison really.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'd be looking more towards living on the sea than living off the land. Seems like in the right location with a small skiff a wouldn't have much problem getting year round protein not to mention seaweed for vegetables and as a fertilizer for a garden.

    The key is finding the right location, not just a remote location.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  13. #13

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    When I lived on Lake Clark, I could catch Lake Trout everyday year'around. It was nice to know that I would never starve to death.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I'd be looking more towards living on the sea than living off the land. Seems like in the right location with a small skiff a wouldn't have much problem getting year round protein not to mention seaweed for vegetables and as a fertilizer for a garden.

    The key is finding the right location, not just a remote location.

  14. #14
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    I think a person could practice to "live off the land" wherever they live. Go out and harvest, see how long that quantity lasts. I bet you could get a taste of the experience.

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    Tremendous amount of pressure on the resources in Alaska. You can't just go anywhere and live off the land, those days are gone. The few places that are left are pretty inhospitable to humans because of weather or geographical features. The nice areas to live in Alaska are turning into suburbia....Living along the south coast in a protected area would present the most reliable food source. You would need the means to get at the food. Whether it be deer, bear, fish, crab, clam or other. You still need to be able to motor away from the areas of hunting/fishing pressure to get by. You will be competing with others who have boats, planes, on and off road vehicles of all sorts. Don't forget about land status, you can't do anything on private land....it will be a tough row to hoe...your first few years will make or break you. Ever haul all your water in five gallon buckets? Drag all your firewood in by hand. You don't have delivery out there...while you are building a live-able structure, you are in a wall tent with the bugs and rodents trying to move in with you. The weather will be against you most of the time. You will starve if you wait for good weather...Very rewarding if you are tough enough to handle it and very humbling if you are not.

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    lol, you had me going. I was beginning to believe. and then you crushed it.
    Suppose I have most of those things, but Wisconsin is still L48
    guess I'll just keep punching a clock, contemplating my life. Hoping for a humbling experience and other life rewards to stumble on me.


    sorry meant to quote this post.

    A single guy with decent wilderness skills could still do it. You would need to have a big initial cash outlay. You would need to have minimal obligations. You would need connections, but it is still possible. L48ers... please disregard.
    Last edited by Kmksunfire; 06-16-2015 at 07:57. Reason: meant to quote

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