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Thread: Rent a plane for flightseeing

  1. #1
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    Default Rent a plane for flightseeing

    Could you guys recommend an FBO out of Anchorage that would be willing to rent a plane for flightseeing? I would like to log some AK time (dual of course). There will be 3 (4 including the instructor) of us so it would have to be at least a 182 if not slightly bigger. I was looking and it appears that Take Flight Alaska has a Diamond Twin Star for rent. I broke down the cost 3 ways and it looks like we could do a 3 hour trip for only slightly more than the cost of going with a tour company....what do you guys think?

  2. #2

    Default Diamond Twin Star

    Take Flight does have a Diamond Twin Star available and a Cessna 207. The problem with the twin star is low wing and engine cowlings blocking your view. The twin star is very comfy with leather seats and the G1000 cockpit so its a blast to fly. Last I heard it was around $370 an hour dual only so its not the cheapest plane but it only has 133 total time on it so its almost new.

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    I didn't see the 207 for rent on thier website...I wonder what the rate on that would be. I just thoght the DA40 would be nice because there would be 4 of us. Do you think the 207 would work?

  4. #4

    Default 207

    the diamond is the DA-42 (twin diesel engines) not the DA-40. The current price for the 207 is around $270 an hour dual only. If you want to rent either aircraft you should probably call them a week in advance to make sure they and the instructor are available.

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    I am amazed that they still lease out a 207 after those three ouitside pilots ran the last one into the Barren Islands at full speed in a cloud..
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I am amazed that they still lease out a 207 after those three ouitside pilots ran the last one into the Barren Islands at full speed in a cloud..

    Whoa! Didn't hear about that one! When did that happen?

    Mort

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    http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/GenPDF.asp?...05FA090&rpt=fa

    The airline transport certificated pilot and the two pilot-rated passengers traveled to Alaska for a Title 14, CFR Part 91 personal
    flying vacation. The pilot received a VFR check-out in a rented airplane, and was the only person authorized by its owner to fly it.
    The pilot obtained a weather briefing for the day of the accident flight, and queried an FAA automated flight service station (AFSS)
    specialist about VFR conditions for a sight-seeing flight. The FSS specialist stated, in part, "Well, it doesn't really look good
    probably anywhere today..." The area forecast included areas of marginal VFR and IFR conditions, and an AIRMET for mountain obscuration.
    The cloud and sky conditions included scattered clouds at 1,500 feet in light rain showers, with areas of isolated ceilings below 1,000
    feet, and visibility below 3 statute miles in rain showers and mist. The weather briefing included a report from a pilot who was about
    23 miles north of the accident scene about 2 hours before the accident airplane departed. The pilot reported fog and mist to the water,
    and said he was unable to maintain VFR. Five minutes after receiving the weather briefing, the accident pilot again called the AFSS and
    requested the telephone number to an automated weather observing system, located south of the point of departure, where VFR conditions
    were forecast. Local fishing charter captains reported fog in the area of the islands where the accident occurred. One vessel captain
    reported hearing an airplane in the vicinity of the islands, but could not see it because of the fog. The pilot did not file a flight
    plan, nor did he indicate any planned itinerary. The airplane was reported overdue two days after departure. The accident wreckage was
    located an additional two days later on the north cliff face of a remote island. The airplane had collided with the island at high
    speed, about 800 feet mean sea level, and a postcrash fire had incinerated the cockpit and cabin area.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Flot Pilot~
    That stinks.....When you say dual only for the 207 would they not allow my buddies to ride along in the plane with me?

  9. #9
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    That was a sweet flying 207 too. Dick Ardaiz bought it new in 74, sold it a few years ago to Denali Air, bought it back and completely refurbished it. I had many, many hours in 21U.

    Bad day, I was flying back from Kodiak when that happened and can remember looking at the crappy weather around the Barrens and south peninsula.

  10. #10
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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post



    The airline transport certificated pilot and the two pilot-rated passengers traveled to Alaska for a Title 14, CFR Part 91 personal
    flying vacation. The pilot received a VFR check-out in a rented airplane, and was the only person authorized by its owner to fly it.
    The pilot obtained a weather briefing for the day of the accident flight, and queried an FAA automated flight service station (AFSS)
    specialist about VFR conditions for a sight-seeing flight. The FSS specialist stated, in part, "Well, it doesn't really look good
    probably anywhere today..." The area forecast included areas of marginal VFR and IFR conditions, and an AIRMET for mountain obscuration.
    The cloud and sky conditions included scattered clouds at 1,500 feet in light rain showers, with areas of isolated ceilings below 1,000
    feet, and visibility below 3 statute miles in rain showers and mist. The weather briefing included a report from a pilot who was about
    23 miles north of the accident scene about 2 hours before the accident airplane departed. The pilot reported fog and mist to the water,
    and said he was unable to maintain VFR. Five minutes after receiving the weather briefing, the accident pilot again called the AFSS and
    requested the telephone number to an automated weather observing system, located south of the point of departure, where VFR conditions
    were forecast. Local fishing charter captains reported fog in the area of the islands where the accident occurred. One vessel captain
    reported hearing an airplane in the vicinity of the islands, but could not see it because of the fog. The pilot did not file a flight
    plan, nor did he indicate any planned itinerary. The airplane was reported overdue two days after departure. The accident wreckage was
    located an additional two days later on the north cliff face of a remote island. The airplane had collided with the island at high


    speed, about 800 feet mean sea level, and a postcrash fire had incinerated the cockpit and cabin area.
    Thanks, Dragonfly,

    Lost a nice Beech Sierra like that a few years back. Had bought it new, and leased it back to Gil's Aviation at Merrill for an instrument platform. A not-quite-ready pilot lit out for Iliamna one overcast morning at about 3:00 am. Tried Lake Clark, tried Pedro Bay, tried Chinitna Bay, even tried Pile Bay, but none of those slots was suitable for him.

    Smacked into Slope Mountain at the 1,000 foot level. With the ceilings reported at 1,000 feet, I've always wondered why he wasn't down there closer to 100 feet?

    Ah, well ...................... four more went West that day.

    Thanks for the report,

    Mort

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