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Thread: halibut and anchor system

  1. #1
    Member sgtpunisher's Avatar
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    Default halibut and anchor system

    i like fishing for halibut out of seward, but i hate pulling up my anchor by hand from 200 feet. talk about a work out. anyway i want to get one of the red ball bouy's and get one of those anchor retriving system by just driving and having the ball float the anchor. but im not sure on what all i need or how to hook it up safley. can anyone help?

  2. #2
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Anchor system

    Don't get the kind with the plastic sleeve that your rope goes through. If your anchor is stuck it will pull your bouy down under the surface and the rope will be stuck, you will lose it all, rope, bouy and anchor. These kind of sleeves allow the rope to only go one direction.

    The other is a ring approx. 6" in dimaeter attached to your bouy that your rope goes through, you run the boat at appros 5-7 miles per hour and make a large circle, as the bouy lifts the anchor the anchor chain will go through the ring and the weight will keep the anchor hanging in the ring and bouy, retrive your rope, acnhor and bouy.

    Hope this makes some sense. had to have my buddy show me the first time as it seem intimidating the first time.

    Oh and he lost all his gear using the plastic sleeve system.
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  3. #3
    Member sgtpunisher's Avatar
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    Default

    wont the anchor rope get caught in the prop?

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    It shouldnt if you are careful. The anchor should be connected to the bow of the boat. When you retrieve watch where the line is going as you are making your circle.
    LIke the man said, it is a lot easier to do than to explain.
    Tennessee

  5. #5

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    I've used this system a few times and it worked well, although it always seems a little nerve racking keeping an eye on the line to make sure it doesn't go under the boat/into the prop.

    Let's say you set your anchor out and now you're ready to go. You've drifted south of your anchor. Let's call where your anchor currently is the 12 o'clock position (north of you in this case). Run toward the 10 o'clock position. The line will be on the starboard/right side where you can keep an eye on it as you go. You'll know when it's time to stop when you see your buoy being drug across the top of the water at the same speed that you're going. Then you just bring in the line by hand without having to pull up the weight of the anchor/chain. It's hard to explain, but once you do it, it'll be clear. Of course, the main thing is to make sure the line doesn't get caught in the prop.

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    If you get the silver ring that attaches to the buoy make sure it the one with a solid loops. They sell some with the circle having a gap. They will over time become the weak point and break. Your rope won't get caught in the motor if you go slow and make a wide circle. Have some one in the back to monitor the rope.
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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Don't get to small of a bouy or it won't float your anchor. After you start the pull keep the bouy in your sight while turning in a large circle to the right. The rope and bouy provide plenty of drag on the water to pull the anchor while circling and keeping it all clear of the boat. If you pull fast enough to almost get on step a 20lb anchor will make a splash out of the water telling you it is up. Gently back off the throttle and then take out of gear while allowing the rope to turn the boat towards the anchor. Nothing should ever get toward the back of the boat if done correctly. Works best if you have a person pull the rope so you can maintain control of the boat if necessary in rougher water. After a couple of pulls you will get the hang of it. It can actually be fun or maybe I'm just weird!

    You might even try it on a lake where the water is calm if your still nervous. If you have someone designated to handle the rope have them also watch the bouy as you pull to insure you get the anchor all the way up or it will fall again if the chain isn't through the ring.

    This may all sound complicated but in all seriousness it is not difficult. Pay attention and it will all come together pretty quick.

  8. #8
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Sportsmans Warehouse

    has the whole set up already assembled and rated for upto 60#anchor. It is what I bought and is awesome. Bought a new ring and rope this year but bouy was still good.

    When retrieving I go in more of a straight line then circle back once the anchor bouy is bouncing. where your bouy is, is where your line will be. I run the bouy down the side of my boat. Once i see the bouy get to the transome I just barely turn to the right. That kicks the back of the boat away from the bouy and line. Then gun it. The pressure from pulling on your bow will slightly want to turn your boat. I usually get to 2700rpms when pulling my anchor. once the bouy is bouncing i run for a few seconds just to make sure the anchor and chain had enough time to get into the ring. good luck. have fun. be safe. Oh if your anchor is really stuck or you have kelp hung up on your line it will definately freak you out when all of sudden your bow raises up really high and then whips around so fast it nearly swamps the boat. But you will do fine. Just pay attention to the scum line.

  9. #9
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default

    Or you can shell out the $650 and get an anchor winch (which serves as a dandy backup to your pot puller when you blow the fuse and don't have a spare . . . ).

    SH

  10. #10
    Member Mort's Avatar
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    Default Other tips

    Some other things to keep in mind-

    1. NEVER tie off your anchor line to a rear cleat in order to keep it out of the prop. If you don't get the anchor off the bottom (stuck) you will be anchored from the stern - a prime setup for swamping! A friend almost learned this the hard way.

    2. Try to pull your anchor so that when it gets to the ring and you are ready to pull the rode in, your boat is upwind of the buoy. It will be blown toward the buoy, instead of having to pull everything in.

    3. Have an extra ring/tether with you. If one breaks, you may be able to retrieve your buoy (or someone may help) and you can salvage your trip. Insurance - little cost, takes little room.

    Mort

  11. #11
    Member sgtpunisher's Avatar
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    Default anchor winch

    i thought about an anchor winch but most only come with 100' of rope.

  12. #12
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgtpunisher View Post
    i thought about an anchor winch but most only come with 100' of rope.
    If you buy an anchor winch like the Power 26 sold at Dewey's or any other place for that matter, it comes with no rope. I have 600' of rope and 30' of chain, and the winch uses it just fine . . .

    SH

  13. #13

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    I think that another name for the wench is a rope capstan.

  14. #14

    Cool Anchoring

    Have never figured out why you would need to anchor to fish for butts especially in 20+ falthoms of water. I've found that just putting the stern into the wind/current and using the kicker in reverse to keep me over a spot works very nicely. Used this method while fishing out of Dutch and it worked there and I've used it off of Needles and off Naked and in both cases several other boats were setting and pulling thier anchors-which took considerable time and effort while we just kept in one place with our kicker and limited out in short order. It does take a little practice to get the motor speed set and every once in a while you'll need to adjust a bit but much preferable in my book to dropping the hook. But then again I prefer to fish for butts with a little drift...

  15. #15
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Talking Another

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    I think that another name for the wench is a rope capstan.
    Actually a wench is: a young girl or a a lewd woman.;D

    I think you mean winch.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 06-14-2007 at 18:40.

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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I think you man winch.
    Yes, I am a man winch, as I must pull the anchor myself and I have no winch (or wench) to pull it for me

    I knew that if I guessed at the spelling that I would choose the wrong one.

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    And while we're correcing terms, boats use lines, not ropes. The line connecting your boat to the anchor is called a rode.

  18. #18
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default

    I also use this system a lot. Just go at a 45 degree angle and you should not have any problems with messing up your prop.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  19. #19
    Member sgtpunisher's Avatar
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    Default terms

    sir you are wrong. lines are made of hemp, poly, nylon, cotton,or other synthetics, rope is made of "wire cable" in natical terms called "wire rope."

  20. #20
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Here we go!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

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