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Thread: Halibut on a fly

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    Member AK Tubes's Avatar
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    Default Halibut on a fly

    Over memorial weekend, some friends and I went on a charter out of Seward. One friend caught about a 15-20 pound halibut on his fly rod (SAGE 12wt, 450gr sinktip, Tibor reel). Ever since then, I've been trying to find a record for such a catch. Does anyone know if an official record is out there? I don't expect his fish is close, but it'd be nice to have a number to shoot for.

    Anybody have any stories out there with halibut on a flyrod?

  2. #2

    Default What kind of weights did he use?

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Tubes View Post
    Over memorial weekend, some friends and I went on a charter out of Seward. One friend caught about a 15-20 pound halibut on his fly rod (SAGE 12wt, 450gr sinktip, Tibor reel). Ever since then, I've been trying to find a record for such a catch. Does anyone know if an official record is out there? I don't expect his fish is close, but it'd be nice to have a number to shoot for.

    Anybody have any stories out there with halibut on a flyrod?
    How did he get to the bottom?
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Member Tight Lines's Avatar
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    Did the same thing in Yakutat about four years ago. Cheeted a little using a 9 wt rod, 30# mono, & 1/4 oz. weight about 3 feet above a large straemer fly. We were in about 80 feet of water at slack tide. Hooked a 40# halibut. Man was it a blast, took 35 min. to land & relaese.

    DD

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    Member AK Tubes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    How did he get to the bottom?
    He had a bad - &*% sink tip line. 450grains...whatever that means, I don't use weighted lines often. I think he said it was like 21 feet of sinking tip and whatever the 450grain part is, it's all packed in that 21ft. It was no problem. We were in about 160' of water and he was into his backing. I can't verify he was bouncing it off the ground, but he was down enough to entice the chickee to bite.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    AK Tubes
    450 gr is the weight of the head of the line and they make heavier lines they where originally developed in Europe for trolling and can easily reach 100 ft plus depths.
    I haven't tried halibut on a fly yet but halibut from a kayak is a riot.
    Out of curiosity dose your handle refer to tube flys? (Also developed in Europe for trolling BTW.)

  6. #6
    Member AK Tubes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    AK Tubes
    450 gr is the weight of the head of the line and they make heavier lines they where originally developed in Europe for trolling and can easily reach 100 ft plus depths.
    I haven't tried halibut on a fly yet but halibut from a kayak is a riot.
    Out of curiosity dose your handle refer to tube flys? (Also developed in Europe for trolling BTW.)
    Thanks Rick.
    No, my family has a cataraft, thus the "tubes" part of my handle.
    What's the biggest halibut you've landed in your kayak?
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Do people just not try for halibut on flys? I would have thought this thread would have at least spurred more ideas ...Imagine catching a ling or something? I'm gonna go get some more gear!

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I've got an 800 grain and a 600 grain for king fishing, planning on trying in kodiak for buts this august. ANyway records can be found for fly rod halibut line classes, google IGFA records
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Halibut I haven't tried yet but for lings I did. I got a 48# a few years back out of homer.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  9. #9
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Sorry it took a while for me to respond tubes
    Biggest halibut from a kayak 97lbs. yes she did send me on a Nantucket slay ride and it took about 45 minutes to get her close enough to harpoon then I towed her into shore.
    Gray haven't gotten a ling on a fly yet but rock fish are a blast on a 8 wt.

  10. #10

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    IGFA maintains separate halibut flyrod records. It's pretty common, really. They have very stringent rules on gear and techniques to qualify.

    I've never bothered to submit for records, but have caught some big ones on fly rods over the years. No false modesty there, but we do it for the yuck, but usuallyturn loose anything over about 50 pounds for better eating. No matter what kind of gear.

    Here's some tips that will help a lot. Sink tips used to be my favorites till I tried Rios density compensated sinking lines. I didn't believe it till I tried them, but they beat the pants off my 800 grain heads, both for sink rate and for ease of fishing (keeping your fly near bottom.

    Do yourselves a favor and tie your flies with 40# mono weedless loops. It's frustrating to snag bottom after a long sink, and the weedless loop pretty well eliminates snags while letting your fly scoot right along the bottom.

    Forget about really big hooks, because you won't be setting them well with a flyrod and a lot of line out. Biggest I use is 3/0 on a 14-weight rod, 2/0 on a 12-weight, and 1/0 on 10-weights.

    Buy premium ultrasharp hooks with tiny barbs to help the fish hook themselves.

    Use doubled nail nots to attach your fly line to your backing. Nothing else slips through the guides so well----- in either direction.

  11. #11
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    Default Halibut on a fly rod

    I've personally never tried this, but.....we have a couple of underwater video cameras. A few years back, we were just off the east shoreline of Culross Island in PWS and we dropped the camera down about 90' and spotted a big school of feeder kings, most of them looked to be about 20-25 lbs. We dropped a squid jig in front of the camera and a king immediately made a pass at it, then another (I think we hooked the second one as I recall)....as the king came to the surface, several kings followed it up and then a halibut. The butt came over and nosed the camera and we were all watching over the side to see the king (the water is pretty clear out there) and we could see the hooked king and the other kings as they came up to within about 20' of the surface....and we saw the halibut also. My point is that you could probably have a fly in the water that deep without the super heavy sinking tips and have a pretty good chance at hooking the butt (or a king!)....I still have the video. SE Mike

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