Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Transom welding

  1. #1
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default Transom welding

    Finally got around to getting the transom welded up to get the scuppers back out of the water. Now I just have to wait until spring to try it out...

    11.jpg 2.jpg

    Kudos to Karold's welding in Fairbanks for getting it done.

  2. #2
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    Karolds does a great job, were the scuppers too low...?
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  3. #3
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Yeah, they were underwater with a full tank of gas. Putting a person or two on the back deck along with a cooler would allow water to back up through the scuppers onto the deck. I'm not sure if it was an early design flaw with the PE (this is the first one made) or the weight of the 350 motor. Either way, I am hoping that this takes care of the problem.

  4. #4
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    I am not very familiar with HEWES, I assume it is no longer self bailing..?

    I am working on a old Glasply that is not self bailing, I wish it was, but have wondered how well that works on smaller boats.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  5. #5
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Yes, it is self bailing, however with a heavier load on the back it allowed water to come onto the deck (not real safe). The self bailing deck should work great if the engineers recommendations on this addition are correct. It should get the scuppers just above the water line when fully loaded and the deck should drain normally.

  6. #6
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronster View Post
    Yes, it is self bailing, however with a heavier load on the back it allowed water to come onto the deck (not real safe). The self bailing deck should work great if the engineers recommendations on this addition are correct. It should get the scuppers just above the water line when fully loaded and the deck should drain normally.
    Looks really good. I had similar issues with my GC when it was heavily loaded and several people were on the deck. We added the extension and no more wet deck. Some other benefits we noticed were lower planing speeds, no more porpoising at WFO, better cruise economy, and an overall better ride.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  7. #7
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    Looks really good. I had similar issues with my GC when it was heavily loaded and several people were on the deck. We added the extension and no more wet deck. Some other benefits we noticed were lower planing speeds, no more porpoising at WFO, better cruise economy, and an overall better ride.
    That's exactly what I am hoping for. It was hard to maintain a cruising speed at anything slower than 23 knots before, I am hoping that this will get me closer to 20.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronster View Post
    Finally got around to getting the transom welded up to get the scuppers back out of the water. Now I just have to wait until spring to try it out...

    11.jpg 2.jpg

    Kudos to Karold's welding in Fairbanks for getting it done.

    I see you added zincs to each side of the transom. If the reason is to protect the engines I would think a better location would be on the very back facing the engines. IMO

  9. #9
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    The anodes are over a foot closer to the engines as compared to where the factory put them which was on the back of the hull under the extended transom. Also, these anodes are for the hull, the engines have their own anodes, both internally and externally on the lower unit (usually on the bottom of the cavitation plate) and transom bracket.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    I know there are anodes on/in the engine they are there to protect the engine if they are the only anodes in the back they may not last very long leaving the engine unprotected. That one reason why more anodes are needed on the very back in front of the engine.

    Looking at the picture it appears the hull is shadowing the anodes from protecting the very back. Also having that many anodes in such a small space could cause problems. As odd as this sounds you can have to many zincs.

    I'm making a lot of assumption looking at a single picture and not seeing the boat so I could be wrong. That said....why don't you ask one of the local shop what they think. If you need to add more brackets and zincs it wont take that long.

    If nothing else it will keep you from dreaming about all the fun you will have this coming summer with your boat.

    I would be interested in knowing what they say.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •