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Thread: Do you carry this in your pack

  1. #1
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    Default Do you carry this in your pack

    Interesting stuff it seems this would be a no brainer

    Dwight



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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Nope .......
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    Another nope here...

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Absolutely YES. A couple Israeli bandages and a tourniquet (C-A-T) are mandatory for all off-road adventures. You'll want some of both the 4" and 6" sizes.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Being a medic I always carry in my day pack a field first aid kit with small trauma blood stoppers and a other misc items. And in my atv box a have a bigger kit and in the truck a really big kit. In all my time in the woods I have used my kits only a couple times mainly on small cuts or basic first aid related. It's one of those things better to have it and not need it then not have it and really need it.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Smaller one and quik clot for long trips only.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    No, but the emergency kit has Quik Clot, some gauze, tampons (for broad-head wounds) and other goodies.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
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  8. #8

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    Yes, I have the 6" in my survival E&E bag.

  9. #9
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    Kinda. It's just gauze, so in a way, yeah, I have some with me.

  10. #10

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    No. I carry quik clot and a bloodstopper bandage with tape.

    Even better....take a Wilderness First Responder (WFR) course.

    There are many offered in AK, with AK specifics in mind. Deb is renown in the field and is a local. Highly recommended.

    http://www.safetyed.net/wildernessmedicine.html

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    No for me, but I have a medium size first aid kit in my tent, and carry a smaller one, plus a roll of Duct Tape.

    Another poster mentioned Tampons above, which in fact can suck a lot of blood. But for compression bandages sanitary napkins are a great idea. You can hold it in place with medical tape, and if everything else fails, with Duct Tape

    Want something stickier than duct tape? The red color tape used to close the gaps on the vapor barrier or insulation at your home. It's expensive, and when you pull it off your skin it will certainly remove your fur

  12. #12
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    Kinda. It's just gauze, so in a way, yeah, I have some with me.
    No, it's not "just gauze". The Israeli bandage is a gauze-wrapped cotton trauma pad attached to an elastic ACE-type wrap. The trick item that makes them really cool is the half-moon shaped plastic clamp that is attached to the wrap. The clip allows you to create a pressure dressing and apply a significant amount of pressure over the wound.

    You can do the same thing with standard dressings, but you need 3 pieces to do it. You need the 5x9 trauma pad, a roll of 3" or 4" gauze, and a roll of 4" ACE wrap. Put the trauma pad on the wound. Put the roll of gauze on top of the trauma pad and directly over the wound. Now hold that in place while you use the ACE wrap to secure it all with moderate pressure. The bulk of the gauze roll creates the pressure point.

    The advantage of the Israeli dressing is that it has everything in one vacuum package, taking up about 1/4 of the physical space of the other 3 items, and it costs less than the combined cost of those items. You can get the Israeli dressings in 3-packs for less than $20.

    But aside from all that, the tourniquet is the real life saver. If you have notable bleeding (especially arterial) on an extremity, don't mess around and go straight for the tourniquet. After you have stopped the blood loss, deal with the wound itself. We've been doing it backwards for years. Tourniquets first and fast; high and tight.
    Winter is Coming...

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    For those of us that don't know anything about this item: I found this clip on what the unit is and how to use it:

    The Prepper Project.com "How to Treat a Traumatic Gunshot Wound"

    Thanks for the heads up. I will be adding some of these to our first aid kits.

  14. #14
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    No, it's not "just gauze". The Israeli bandage is a gauze-wrapped cotton trauma pad attached to an elastic ACE-type wrap. The trick item that makes them really cool is the half-moon shaped plastic clamp that is attached to the wrap. The clip allows you to create a pressure dressing and apply a significant amount of pressure over the wound.

    You can do the same thing with standard dressings, but you need 3 pieces to do it. You need the 5x9 trauma pad, a roll of 3" or 4" gauze, and a roll of 4" ACE wrap. Put the trauma pad on the wound. Put the roll of gauze on top of the trauma pad and directly over the wound. Now hold that in place while you use the ACE wrap to secure it all with moderate pressure. The bulk of the gauze roll creates the pressure point.

    The advantage of the Israeli dressing is that it has everything in one vacuum package, taking up about 1/4 of the physical space of the other 3 items, and it costs less than the combined cost of those items. You can get the Israeli dressings in 3-packs for less than $20.

    But aside from all that, the tourniquet is the real life saver. If you have notable bleeding (especially arterial) on an extremity, don't mess around and go straight for the tourniquet. After you have stopped the blood loss, deal with the wound itself. We've been doing it backwards for years. Tourniquets first and fast; high and tight.
    Yeah, it is just gauze. I used and trained with these things for 20 years as a field medic in the military. It's a gauze pad with a way of securing it packaged in a plastic pouch. It does the same thing a wadded up t-shirt or sock will do when secured with and ace wrap or duct tape.

  15. #15
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    OK. I guess your 20 years trumps my 24, since ya had the need to start dropping certs around. I bow to your wisdom. Nothing to see here folks. It's just gauze. The other parts are just a figment of your imagination. Move along.

    Though I have to say (for the benefit of the lurkers, of course), Duct Tape and socks are NOT appropriate bandaging materials. But if you would rather carry a $12 roll of duct tape and a $10 pair of socks, all weighing in at over a pound, instead of a $7 Israeli dressing that weighs about 1.5oz, then go for it. Best of luck, and I hope you never get hurt in the woods.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  16. #16
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    If it will stop the bleeding, its appropriate...the alternative is to bleed to death. I suppose that's an option as well......

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    After finding out the number of hunters that have a live round in the chamber I would prefer having a full torso bullet proof vest. That way I would have a chance of letting him know what it feel like to be shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    After finding out the number of hunters that have a live round in the chamber I would prefer having a full torso bullet proof vest. That way I would have a chance of letting him know what it feel like to be shot.
    Find another thread to take more pop shots, did ya?


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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    After finding out the number of hunters that have a live round in the chamber I would prefer having a full torso bullet proof vest. That way I would have a chance of letting him know what it feel like to be shot.
    Make sure it is Blaze Orange too....

    Since, you know, it is always the fault of the guy who gets shot....According to the "one in the pipe" theorists.....
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    OK. I guess your 20 years trumps my 24, since ya had the need to start dropping certs around. I bow to your wisdom. Nothing to see here folks. It's just gauze. The other parts are just a figment of your imagination. Move along.

    Though I have to say (for the benefit of the lurkers, of course), Duct Tape and socks are NOT appropriate bandaging materials. But if you would rather carry a $12 roll of duct tape and a $10 pair of socks, all weighing in at over a pound, instead of a $7 Israeli dressing that weighs about 1.5oz, then go for it. Best of luck, and I hope you never get hurt in the woods.
    My goodness! It's not that one should carry a roll of duct tape instead of your favorite bandage or whatever it is. My point is that it's not a bad idea to also carry a roll of tape along all the other emergency gear, because whatever you can use at the moment to patch yourself, be it Duct Tape, crazy glue, and so on, may prevent you from bleeding to death. While I don't carry the safety bandage posted at the beginning of this thread, I have emergency first aid kits, one in my tent and the other with me.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/3087228/ns...tes-duct-tape/

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