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Thread: Nets?

  1. #1
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    Default Nets?

    What style/kind of net works best for the Chitina? Where can you get them?

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    I picked my net up from Sam's club. The handle is 10 feet with a "D" handle on the end. I like the fiberglass handle with a nylon mesh net. I have had no complaints. It landed a 48 inch King 2 years ago without any trouble.

    Eric

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    anyone know where i can get a long fiberglass pole or aluminum pole in palmer wasilla? I have a long one now, i think it is 12 feet. i want to get another one to extend my reach.

    thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim mcleary View Post
    anyone know where i can get a long fiberglass pole or aluminum pole in palmer wasilla? I have a long one now, i think it is 12 feet. i want to get another one to extend my reach.

    thanks
    3 Rivers usually has a few long handled nets. I don't know if they have what your looking for or not but you might give them a call.

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    I use a salmon net w/ the 12' fiberglass pole (sams club). I usually use a gillnet bag on the same setup. I have been going to Chitna for 5 years. I used the black net for the first time this year. I missed a lot of fish because I was not fast enough. I like the gillnet because when they hit the net, you pretty much have them but they are a real pain to get out of the net. If the fishing is slow use a gillnet bag on a salmon landing net size hoop. Don't try to use a 5' Kenai net because the river is too fast. some people bring a hoop w/a gillnet and one w/ a black net. You can buy the Gillnet bag to fit a salmon net or extra hoops at B&J.
    I fished on Tuesday went w/ Hem and got my 40 reds but no kings
    Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishmaster View Post
    I use a salmon net w/ the 12' fiberglass pole (sams club). I usually use a gillnet bag on the same setup. I have been going to Chitna for 5 years. I used the black net for the first time this year. I missed a lot of fish because I was not fast enough. I like the gillnet because when they hit the net, you pretty much have them but they are a real pain to get out of the net. If the fishing is slow use a gillnet bag on a salmon landing net size hoop. Don't try to use a 5' Kenai net because the river is too fast. some people bring a hoop w/a gillnet and one w/ a black net. You can buy the Gillnet bag to fit a salmon net or extra hoops at B&J.
    I fished on Tuesday went w/ Hem and got my 40 reds but no kings
    Good luck
    Yes, you have to be fast when you feel a bump on the net. I miss quite a lot of reds when I am tired, because my reaction time is much slower than usual.

    Gill nets are great for catching reds. However, it's much easier for kings to break the strands when compared to the stronger black, red, or green regular nets like the one from Sam's Club. This net (Sam's) is expensive this year. I bought one of them at Sam's Club about four years ago, and paid $48.00.

    Gill nets are much better when the salmon run is slow, because they will catch reds regardless of which way they are moving on the net. However, if there are lots of reds running upstream, then the gill nets slows you down with the time you have to spend removing them from the net. With a regular net you can always dump the salmon upside down into a trash can, or into a a pit you can make from flat rocks by the shore, and then dip the net in the water as fast as possible. If you are in a boat, drip nets will slow you down quite a lot. But there is no denying that if dipping is slow gill nets are the best.

    I use two nets: the solid-aluminum hoop one (Kenai net?), and the regular net I bought at Sam's. The Kenai net's hoop is very wide and heavy, and the replaceable net costs around $28.00 at the local stores in Fairbanks. The regular nets (Sam's Club) have hoops made of aluminum tubing, and are very lightweight.
    ---------
    What I did with both nets was to replace the handles (pipes) with stronger aluminum pipes. I bought these at Frontier's Outfitters in Fairbanks. The handle pieces are five feet long each, but they connect and lock to each other. They cost $20.00 each, and have a blue-color coating. One end of each piece fits into the hoop. The other piece locks into the end of the first piece, and so forth.

    I bought four of the blue aluminum pieces, and then cut two 3-feet pieces from a couple of aluminum poles from old nets I had in the backyard. These old poles have red-color shovel handles attached, and all I had to to was to drill a hole on each piece, insert a steel snap in the pipe (the spring snaps from the end that locks on the hoop), and then push and lock the pipe/shovel handle into the blue aluminum handle. So now I have two sets of poles (handles) that are a little over twelve feet long each.

    I only use the heavier of the two nets in areas where there is an eddy, or where I can anchor the net. I can use the lighter one to sweep the current, or in the same areas as the heavier one. More salmon get in the bigger net, but the smaller one gives me a little more time to land a king before it gets a chance to break the strands and swim through.

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    I always have trouble with the snap that connects the net on fiberglass handles. The hole gets bigger and bigger. I put a bolt through the hole because I was afraid of losing my net. Even with the net bolted through the handle the hole gets bigger with each use. I have thought of using an aluminum pole but the gold colored ones are too light weight and every year I see a few of them bent in half laying on the bank or by the dumpster. I have noticed some people use a blue colored aluminum pole and they look a little more heavy duty. Does anyone have trouble with the snap on them?
    As for gillnets, Usually the ones that come with the net are too light weight. I had to mend mine 3 times while catching 40 Kenai reds a couple of years ago. B&J has all different size replacement nets that are very strong and would handle a king with no problem. some are made out of mono and some are nylon. I always carry a replacement net and some mono in case I need to mend it.

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    fishmaster: the blue-color aluminum handles I mentioned above don't bend like the gold and other aluminum poles do. In fact, I anchor the handle on my large net on a jagged rock's tip, at a point on the handle that is approximately 5 feet from the hoop. This point on the handle is the end of the first handle, immediately across the snap that holds both section together. I just make sure that the snap is in the open, away from the rock that holds the handle against the current. If I use a regular aluminum handle in this fashion, the water completely bends it in half. Not so with the blue-coated handles.

    I don't know if we are talking about the same handle, but the ones I am talking about are very strong and heavier than the regular ones. The blue-coating is very shiny and bright. The tip that goes into the hoop is narrower to fit in there, and the rest is wide enough for you to insert though it a regular aluminum handle (the handle with little diamond-shaped finish). This handle fits right inside the blue handle, and that's why I cut a section of the old handles I have around the yard, topped with a red shovel's handle. In other words, I extend two 5-foot sections to a length of 12' to 13' instead of just a 10-foot handle.

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    I have never used an aluminum handle. In Chitna I see most people that come from Fairbanks using the Blue Aluminum handles. They look more heavy duty and I have never seen one bent in half like the gold ones. Do you have any trouble with the snaps or the hole for the snap growing larger? I just Don't trust the snaps on a fiberglass pole. If I got a big King in my net I think that it would yank the net right off the pole.

  10. #10

    Default Gill Net

    I Used A Kenai Gill Net On The Copper Last Week And Killed Them. It Withstood 9 Kings With Zero Breaks, Tears, Or Failurs Of Any Kind. I Was Able To Release Most Of Them Without Removing The Fish From The Water (practice). I Think They Work Better, Netting More Fish, But Really Hard To Hold In Strong Current Unless You Can Bench Press 400 Pounds. Best To Find A Good Eddie And Tie It Off To A Rock So It Only Takes Two Fingers To Hold It In Place. They Are Much Heavier. When I Go Again I Will Bring Both. If I Have To Sweep I Will Use The Copper River Net, If I Can Use An Eddie I'll Use The Kenai Gill-net Style.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishmaster View Post
    I have never used an aluminum handle. In Chitna I see most people that come from Fairbanks using the Blue Aluminum handles. They look more heavy duty and I have never seen one bent in half like the gold ones. Do you have any trouble with the snaps or the hole for the snap growing larger? I just Don't trust the snaps on a fiberglass pole. If I got a big King in my net I think that it would yank the net right off the pole.
    No problems with the snaps on the blue aluminum handles, nor on the other handles except for the fiberglass ones. This material is just too soft, and eventually wears out inside the hoop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    I Used A Kenai Gill Net On The Copper Last Week And Killed Them. It Withstood 9 Kings With Zero Breaks, Tears, Or Failurs Of Any Kind. I Was Able To Release Most Of Them Without Removing The Fish From The Water (practice). I Think They Work Better, Netting More Fish, But Really Hard To Hold In Strong Current Unless You Can Bench Press 400 Pounds. Best To Find A Good Eddie And Tie It Off To A Rock So It Only Takes Two Fingers To Hold It In Place. They Are Much Heavier. When I Go Again I Will Bring Both. If I Have To Sweep I Will Use The Copper River Net, If I Can Use An Eddie I'll Use The Kenai Gill-net Style.
    Most have been smaller kings. A large king will easily snap the strands of even the black-color nets. One of my coworker's wife almost landed an approximately 5' king a week ago, but by the time she dragged the net out of the water the king had already punched a huge hole thought it, and jumped out the hole into the water.

    A small king of perhaps 30 pounds in weight snapped a couple of strands on my Kenai net on the opening day in the subsistence area by the fish wheels
    (june 1st.), but I dragged it out of the water before it had a chance to break through the net. I had had several kings breaking my regular nets in the past, but landed a 55 pounder a few years ago, just when the head was already out the net.

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    Wildog: I forgot to mention that the snaps in the blue-color handles are of a larger diameter than those in the fiberglass and regular aluminum handles.

    I bought a red shovel handle at Frontier's Outfitters in Fairbanks, and this handle comes with a short section of silver-color aluminum pipe, with a snap at the end. This set is made to fit into the blue-color handles (pipes), and the snap fits on the larger holes found on the blue handles. However, once I got home I decided not to use the included aluminum handle (red shovel handle), because it was too short. That's when I cut a couple of 3' sections of pipe from the old handles I had laying around, and then used the snap in the short pipe with the red shovel-handle, as well as the red shovel handle. The larger diameter snap takes any slack out of the connection. The red shovel handle makes the set-up very easy to control when dipped in the water, since it allows me to stop the net's hoop from rotating.

    Those who worry about the snaps can install a sheet metal screw near each snap.

  14. #14

    Default Blue handle

    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromAK View Post
    Wildog: I forgot to mention that the snaps in the blue-color handles are of a larger diameter than those in the fiberglass and regular aluminum handles.

    I bought a red shovel handle at Frontier's Outfitters in Fairbanks, and this handle comes with a short section of silver-color aluminum pipe, with a snap at the end. This set is made to fit into the blue-color handles (pipes), and the snap fits on the larger holes found on the blue handles. However, once I got home I decided not to use the included aluminum handle (red shovel handle), because it was too short. That's when I cut a couple of 3' sections of pipe from the old handles I had laying around, and then used the snap in the short pipe with the red shovel-handle, as well as the red shovel handle. The larger diameter snap takes any slack out of the connection. The red shovel handle makes the set-up very easy to control when dipped in the water, since it allows me to stop the net's hoop from rotating.

    Those who worry about the snaps can install a sheet metal screw near each snap.
    The one I used was from B & J's
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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