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Thread: Hornaday reload equipment

  1. #1
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    Default Hornaday reload equipment

    Thinking of getting reloading again. Got my first rcbs stuff when i was 16 or so, and sold it all about 10 years ago , no good reason
    The hornaday stuff looks nice in the package they sell. I know it lacks some vital equipment, but besides that would you recommend buying the kit and adding what you may need later, or buying everything piece by piece and put it all together yourself?
    They have the lock n load classic kit plus another precision kit with case trimmer, concentricity tool, etc
    Ideas?

  2. #2
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I'd start with a kit, then add what you need as you need it. You really can't go wrong with any of the kits out there.

    I bought the Lyman T-Mag Expert Deluxe. It came with an electronic digital scale, but more importantly for me it was the only kit I could find at the time which included a case trimmer.
    Now what ?

  3. #3
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    I bought my stuff off eBay a piece at a time. I started with the press, balance, trimmer, chamfer tool and bought a nice set of calipers too. I found I didn't like the RCBS trimmer as it wasn't giving me a case mouth perpendicular to the bore, and bought the CH4D trimmer with a couple of case holders. It makes perfectly perpendicular case mouths and is less expensive.

    You don't have to spend a lot. I bought the RCBS Jr. press and used it for years loading up to the .500 A-Sq. which is a long case. I then splurged on an older, but in mint condition, Rockcrusher. The thing must weigh 25 pounds. Quite a change from the RCBS Jr. which is aluminum, but it sure is smooth and a joy to use. I wouldn't want to be setting back the shoulder of a large case with the Jr., the Rockcrusher can handle that with ease.

    There are other brands of presses and equipment that are excellent; Lyman, CH4D, RCBS, Hornady, Redding, ect. Just look at their websites to see what you might want. They are all running roughly the same price. And remember: you get what you pay for.
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    I didn't mind weighing each charge during load development but now that I've settled on some recipes I love using my electronic dispenser. I tried a Lee powder dispenser but I didn't like the accuracy.


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    Knowing what, I think I know, now, I would not start with a KIT.

    I would get a good press, like the Redding Big Boss, or other, whatever I could afford. and go from there with a variety of brands. Dies for example, aren't all the same in design, and you might prefer one set over another for specific purposes.

    Since, you have some handloading experience, already, you know what you will need. (You know, that Kit, "lacks some vital equipment")

    I'm not familiar with Hornady equipment, other than one set of dies. I prefer Redding equipment, but not for everything. I also use Lee, Lyman, and RCBS.

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    If I loaded before and knew what I wanted I would buy one piece at a time picking what I liked from different makers. If I was a new loader I probably would get a kit to get started and then replace or add to as I progressed.

  7. #7

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    Most of my stuff is RCBS but I do have 3 sets of Hornady dies and a few other Hornady tools. I have been pleased with what I have made by Hornady, but like my RCBS stuff also. Make a list of what you want or need and check the prices of them verses a kit. I went to the local wal-mart last night and they had several RCBS kits in stock. They had no powder or primers and very few bullets.

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    Default Piece by piece is the way to go.

    Quote Originally Posted by sh View Post
    Thinking of getting reloading again. Got my first rcbs stuff when i was 16 or so, and sold it all about 10 years ago , no good reason
    The hornaday stuff looks nice in the package they sell. I know it lacks some vital equipment, but besides that would you recommend buying the kit and adding what you may need later, or buying everything piece by piece and put it all together yourself?
    They have the lock n load classic kit plus another precision kit with case trimmer, concentricity tool, etc
    Ideas?
    The kits are ok but you'll find there are tools you won't like or never use. My biggest gripe is the powder measure and scale. The one in the kit is very inaccurate and unreliable for consistent drops and weights. I ended up getting a Lyman electronic and I'm quite happy with it's consistency. I think it's better to measure every load and then double check to make sure you haven't skimped or doubled up. I reload a lot of 5.7 X 28 and really need this accuracy. The most useless tool in the kit is the hand chamfer. I bought the electronic version Hornady offers and never looked back. It is much quicker and more consistent. Reloading is all about consistency and accuracy. Get what works for you and don't skimp on quality.

    I ended up with tools from different manufacturers for different purposes. I do prefer the Hornady dies, especially for 5.7 X 28. If I was going to do it over, with a kit in mind, I'd go for a Dillon.

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    Default Preference

    I have a Hornady lock and Load and a Dillon 550. The Hornady is a lot more finicky because of the auto indexing it has to be kept very clean, with no spilled powder. The Dillon is manually indexed and you are less likely to have as many problems. Just my opinion.

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    Thanks for info everybody. I ended up piecing together equipment after reviewing kit contents closely.
    Hope to crank out some test loads soon for my 308 and see how it goes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by houndsnmules View Post
    I have a Hornady lock and Load and a Dillon 550. The Hornady is a lot more finicky because of the auto indexing it has to be kept very clean, with no spilled powder. The Dillon is manually indexed and you are less likely to have as many problems. Just my opinion.
    He is talking about the L-n-L classic not the AP progressive.

    I sold my 550 for a 2nd Hornady L-n-L-AP after I got the first. I agree with your point about powder, get powder in there and the primer shuttle locks everything up . . . caned air is the answer to that.

    Also guys should know going in the Hornady isn't as handy as a 550 for long rounds (like 7mm mag with Burgers) because it uses some of its stroke to index. But for me and what I load on them the Hornady is faster with the indexing and extra station for a powder checking station . . . to me its more like the 650 than 550 but its 550 price.
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