Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Thinking of moving to Anchor Point

  1. #1

    Default Thinking of moving to Anchor Point

    My wife and I have been looking at the Kenai Peninsula for retirement. Not sure if we'll live there year round, but probably at least 6 months of the year. She's an artist so Homer's a draw for her. I'm more into hunting, fishing and just being out in the wilds (or at least close to it) without having to drive anywhere. We've found a couple of places on the Anchor River with 10 acres of land. They're not cheap but we can sell our current place and have no mortgage. I've lived in Montana on the Bitteroot back in the 70s when I had to snowmobile just to get to my Jeep in the winter, but I'm retiring in 4 years and I'm kind of past that unless my old lady kicks me out lol (she says I'm not getting off that easy). Anyway, please tell me pros and cons of Anchor Point and any recommendations for other areas understanding we want acreage, a well and septic, within 30 minutes of a little artsy town driving. We're also looking for waterfront (either ocean or river) with plenty of wildlife around.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,097

    Default

    Sounds to me like the area around Anchor Point would be a good fit for you. An artist would surely feel right at home in the homer area. Winters are mild there by Alaska standards. If you live up the North Fork Anchor River area you have Caribou hills right in your backyard. Lots of good hunting and play opportunities right there. Land is far cheaper there than around the homer proper area yet 30 minutes or so away from town. Same would go for moving out East End Rd. Get out past Mile 16 or so and prices get more reasonable and a bit more remote. The better the views, the more you will pay for land anywhere. Good luck with your search. Its a great area if you dont have to drive to work and back every day.

  3. #3
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    "Plenty of wildlife around."......Unquote.
    A highly subjective statement. It depends on your perspective and interests. There are few places even in alaska that have massive wildlife. What species do you prefer to have access to?
    Your requests for open space, wells, septics, available land w view and/or water access can be met in Anchor Pt. Along with the 'artsy' town availability of Homer being close by.
    One continuing problem with the Anchor Pt area is it's chronic meth problems. Which would concern me if I were not planning on wintering out there or if I did not have someone staying there thru the winter. Even with the State Trooper station being IN Anchor Pt they have been little help -unfortunately.
    Another er town worth considering that may fit your criteria would be Seward as the 'artsy' town and settling either there or just outside in Moose Pass or Cooper Landing.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Another town worth considering that may fit your criteria would be Seward as the 'artsy' town and settling either there or just outside in Moose Pass or Cooper Landing.
    Moose Pass would be high on my list if I were relocating - primarily because it is set in the mountains, and I far prefer mountainous terrain for hunting and recreation to the rolling hills of the Anchor Point area. Both areas have good access to fishing, neither has access to stellar hunting other than black bear. Moose can be had along with a relatively low chance of sheep, but it's worth understanding that the Kenai Peninsula is not a Shangri-La for big game hunting.

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Moose Pass would be high on my list if I were relocating - primarily because it is set in the mountains, and I far prefer mountainous terrain for hunting and recreation to the rolling hills of the Anchor Point area. Both areas have good access to fishing, neither has access to stellar hunting other than black bear. Moose can be had along with a relatively low chance of sheep, but it's worth understanding that the Kenai Peninsula is not a Shangri-La for big game hunting.
    I have to say that I really do like Moose Pass as well. But.....those storms roll through there on down to Seward so often I think it'd be hard to take after awhile. Then again....I am getting old......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,097

    Default

    The problem with Moose Pass is there is basically no land available. Certianly no acreage. There isn't hardly a place there that you can park your toy trailers in your yard. Beautiful area. I play there alot in the winter months. I'd love to live in that area if you could get a decent building site.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    401

    Default

    There is elbow room in Moose Pass. Most of the lots are about an acre + or -. The cost of utilities are much higher in Seward and Moose Pass than in Soldotna and that side of the peninsula. Heat is fuel oil in Seward and Moose Pass and the electric department is very disfunctional. Soldotna has natural gas and the electrical utility is a REA. Their priory is electricity where as Seward is a Municipality and there priority isn't reliable power. they use it as a cash cow for all their other projects they have. They are reactive rather than proactive when it comes to there upkeep on their electric infrastructure. If you move to Seward or Moose Pass make sure you have your own generator. Most of Moose Pass is Chuguch Electric and is at the very end of their system and is their lowest priority. You might be out of power for a week at a time.

  8. #8
    Member logman 49's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Just South of Moose Pass
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiak kid View Post
    There is elbow room in Moose Pass. Most of the lots are about an acre + or -. The cost of utilities are much higher in Seward and Moose Pass than in Soldotna and that side of the peninsula. Heat is fuel oil in Seward and Moose Pass and the electric department is very disfunctional. Soldotna has natural gas and the electrical utility is a REA. Their priory is electricity where as Seward is a Municipality and there priority isn't reliable power. they use it as a cash cow for all their other projects they have. They are reactive rather than proactive when it comes to there upkeep on their electric infrastructure. If you move to Seward or Moose Pass make sure you have your own generator. Most of Moose Pass is Chuguch Electric and is at the very end of their system and is their lowest priority. You might be out of power for a week at a time.


    Hmmmm....... Lived Just south of Moose Pass for a long time now and have to say I don't see the same problems with the Electric utility.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Hmmmm, I was a lineman in the area for a few years and was always working on Chuguch's system when we wernt bussy and if we were busy they would sit without power for days.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    401

    Default

    I should add it all depends on the weather. if it is an open winter there's not many problems. If there is some snow and wind you better be prepared to not have power for a few days.

  11. #11
    Member Delta Tenderfoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Great information!
    I have the sameplan about retiring on the peninsula. The price of land is what it is and compared to the lower 48 not out ofline for similar amenities such as shoreline, views or river/lake front. Justdon’t use Jackson Hole, WY or Missoula, MT for comparison.
    I have been lurkingon other forums which have been talking about water quality and the levels of arsenicand iron. After having worked in the Middle East I findthat water quality has inched up on my list of concern. I also have found out that there is someunique construction techniques used in Alaska that banks tend not to like.
    Is there a realissue with well water quality? How prevalentis permafrost and can conventional foundations be used on the peninsula or arefrost protected slabs used?
    Vr
    Drew
    All paradise rests in the shadow of swords." ~K. Yates

  12. #12
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Homer
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    Water quality- location location location. Literally one subdivision to the next can have great well water, or one that is high in iron. Water delivery is common in the area.

    Foundations- there is no permafrost on the southern Kenai. The winter frost line is usually 3-4 feet. Excavated crawl space/ concrete footer foundations as well as slab on grade are both commonly used in the area. Additionally, a lot of DIY built houses use sono-tube posts.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •