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Thread: Skid plate for a polaris ranger 6x6

  1. #1
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    Default Skid plate for a polaris ranger 6x6

    Looking for a guy that makes a skid plate for a Polaris Ranger 6x6 out of 1/4 inch aluminum. I have seen his work on a polaris forum and he goes by sledhead ak and is in Alaska but was not able to contact him. I would like to contact him or someone else that would be able to make one with the quality work that he did at a reasonable price any help would be great.

  2. #2

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    Skip the aluminum and get the full Trail Armor skidplate. Its a lot of money but it's bombproof (1/2" UHMW) and protects the entire underside front to back and side to side. Mine has taken a bearing and has easily paid for itself.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I agree, aluminum gouges and plastic slides.
    AKmud
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    I have looked into the Trial Armor skidplate, but how much does it weigh compared to the aluminum? I'm thicking about 150 pounds for the entire thing. All I really need is the center piece. I have found a skid plate on Ebay that is 3/16 thick for about $180. Even after I buy one I will have to have it modified as none of the skid plates have a front lip to allow for slidding over rocks and deep ruts, I was able ot get 2 seasons out of the old one this year did it in. Every polaris 6x that I seen on the trail had a torn skid plates.

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    Looked up how much a piece of Aluminum versus UHMW weights I think you will find out that the UHMW is very light maybe as much as Aluminum say 20#. The most importance thing is UHMW will slide over rocks Aluminum will not.

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    While I do not have a Ranger, I do have non metal skid plates on our Arctic Cat Prowler and like them a lot better than metal skid plates. They UHMW plates tend to slid over things and while they get pushed out of shape, they tend to come back to somewhat of a 'normal' shape. There have been times when the skid plates came loose and we were able to secure them back in place with some good tie wraps. I do not think that you would be able to do that with the metal ones. For what we tend to carry in/on our machines, I do not think that the weight difference would make much of a difference.

  7. #7

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    The Trail Armor skid goes all the way to front, it won't get hung up on anything. I'm hard on mine and it has gouges all over the bottom. The factory skid plate is a POS and lasted about 2 months before I had broken side plastics and a bent trans cross member. Got the TA skid plate and haven't looked back. I guess it will depend on your riding style, but I like the ability to slide over obstacles without worrying about damage. It's amazing where you can go when you know you won't damage the bottom. It also sticks out about 1" on each side so it completely protects the side plastic.

    Its not real heavy, but I already carry a few hundred pounds worth of recover gear and spare parts everywhere I go so weights not a concern to me, that's why we buy 6x's. Even if the skid was 100 lbs I'd still run it for the protection, there's nothing else that even comes close.

  8. #8

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    The hi density plastic is the way to go for sure. It's all I've been using for the last 12 years and am impressed for sure. Go to Image Plastics that is now behind Fire and Fastners to get what you need, possibly even finding something in the remnants and cutting cost a little. I used 3/8" on the Foreman and feel it's overkill as 1/4" is just fine and is a little easier to heat up and form ends if you need to.
    Use a forsner bit on your drill press to counter sink your mount bolts so it's smooth like a toboggan and a hole saw for any drain points like oil, diffs etc. Here's the one I made for the Foreman that's been bouncing off rocks for years.....
    The Wife's old 300...I used 1/4" here. This machine went to a new owner this last spring so she has a new Griz 700 I need to make one for.
    This one is the back portion of my Big Boss 6x6.....I have a full sheet in the garage for the rest of the skid and the Griz skid but haven't gotten around to it yet with house projects.

  9. #9

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    I've even used it to make my own ski skins for sleds....here's some on my Ole 1970 Panther I restored, I use this sled for chasing birds and with the 12" wide skis she sets right on top of the powder. The plastic is the way to go.....

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    3/8 UHMW is not think enough. My hunting partner had one on is machine that he made by purchasing the plastic and used the old one as a template. We ending cutting off front on that one also. I have a email into Trail Armor to find out if I can just purchase the center part of the skid plate. While I understand the peace of mind to have a full carriage covered I think it is a little to much for me and the use I'm doing. As far as weight it all adds up when you have a moose and all you hunting gear in the bed and half of the cab filled. I just perfer to be light and agile as possible. I will repost when I here back from TA, if not I may look into purchasing a piece of the 1/2 inch stuff and making it myself.

  11. #11

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    Wow 1/2" huh? Petex that's black with the white specks in it is what I've always been told is the most dense and is what I have always used. I've bounced hard time and time again off rocks and whatnot without effecting the plastic but your Ranger 6x6 is heavier for sure. If the air boats can run dry ground with the stuff it must be stout eh.

  12. #12

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    The side plastics are over $100 ea. Having the wiring near your battery get pulled out/broken/ripped by brush is $$$ and a tuff field fix. I've also seen the factory gas tank skids bend. I don't see the point in only protecting the middle, when the sides take every bit as much of a beating. I'm only guessing, but I'd estimate the two side pieces (of the TA skid) to be around 10 pounds each. All 5 pieces of the Trail Armor skid interlock together so I'm guessing they won't sell just the middle (the fasteners would not work correctly).

    If you're only wanting the middle, just get a piece of UHMW from CAC Plastics and trace out the factory skid plate and make one yourself.

    Pic I stole from the TA website.

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    Member theultrarider's Avatar
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    Nice. What's the price tag on that? And who did you order it from? Did you get your heavy duty tie rod kit yet? How do you like that? My tie rod ends are about shot so I think I'm gonna go that route.

  14. #14

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    I've had the tie rod kits for awhile, but I haven't installed them yet. I was going to wait and make it a winter project, I just pack them as spares for now.

    I purchased the skid plate from sidexsidestuff.com, they were great to deal with. It was $800 shipped to my door. Trail Armor will not ship to a freight forwarder, so there aren't many options. All the vendors drop ship them UPS, but sidexsidestuff.com had the best delivered price. It was a big expense, and my only regret was not doing it sooner.

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    Trail Armor will NOT sell just the center skid plate its all or nothing. Looks like I will be making my own.

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    Why just the center though? If you're gonna spend that much time and money, cover the whole thing. You should see the side plastics on my rig where you enter the cab. Both sides are all broke out from striking rocks. My doors are messed up too. Like snwmbl said, I sure wish I had known about trail armor plate sooner and had installed one. The steel braces under the sides are all bent up as well and do worry about damaging my fuel tank. Granted. Not alot of people will follow me in alot of places that I go lol. I generally dont abuse my ride, but am not afraid to use it hard either. Thats alot of money upfront. But sure will pay for itself quickly. What just a blank sheet of 1/2" uhmw run these day? And then all the time spent to fab it up vs a ready to bolt on product?

  17. #17
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    I made my skid plate out of 3/16" aluminum after ripping off my stocker in the first 10 miles of owning the machine. I've never had any problems being able to slide over rocks and other obstacles, my skid plate has held up great for over 500 miles of extremely rough terrain. I looked at the TA full body skid plates and they're nice but not $800 nice. I've got $100 bucks and some fab time into mine and it does the trick..

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    Likewise. I tore the leading edge of mine 1st trip out. Took a 4" wide piece of scrap aluminum and protected that leading edge. 1000 miles of rocks logs and stumps later the stock plate is holding up well. Its the area out to the sides that arent protected that are getting torn up pretty bad.

  19. #19

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    You might not agree with the price, but they are $800 nice (keep in mind $160 of that is shipping). They are CNC machined with over lapping edges to lock them in place, and the fit is perfect. A sheet of 1/2" UHMW from CAC Plastics is well over $600 so it wasn't worth the difference to me to have to do all the fabrication myself. The sides of the TA skid plate are also bent up on the front and back to assist in sliding over obstacles.

    Like ultrarider posted, the side plastics take a beating and cost $125 ea. The metal supports on the floorboards will bend (mine did), the gas tank skid will bend with a hard enough hit (saw it on a Ranger last week), and all the wiring near the battery is susceptible to damage from brush coming up. Not to mention the trans cross member can bend (mine was), and the frame near the center and rear diff can bend (mine had small dents).

    I'm all for making one yourself, I've fabbed most of the mods to my Ranger, but time is money and there is no way to match the quality and durability of the TA skid without a bunch of time into it. If you make one yourself, I would still strongly suggest covering the entire underside or you'll be paying for it later.

  20. #20
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    I absolutely agree with the Trail Armor. I have the Trail Armor on my 6X6 Ranger and it is the way to go. in the rocks it is bulletproof and glides and bounces over them. In the mud, it glides through it instead of balling up. I have had it on my 6X6 Ranger for 2 years now and have beat it silly but it looks and performs like it is still new. No way would I recommend plastic or aluminum after my experience. Worth every dime.

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