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Thread: Forbes or mountain ascent

  1. #1
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Default Forbes or mountain ascent

    I was thinking of going the custom route for a lightweight mountain rifle but I am now thinking I may just buy an off the shelf rifle. I had initially thought I was going to go 257wby but I want to shed as much weight as possible so now I have decided to go with the short action 7mm-08.
    I know some on here have the kimber, does anyone have the forbes? How do they shoot for you what do you like or don't like. I'm leaning forbes myself because of the 500 dollar difference and only an ounce or two difference between them.
    Thanks

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    I have one Forbes in 270 caliber. Without any adjustments it shot better with three different brands of ammo than any of the four Kimber rifles in three different calibers that I have owned.

    Lately their have been some complaints about the finishing work on the Forbes rifle. Especially in the bedding area. Check out what you buy carefully for cosmetic situations. If you do it online be sure to ask for quality pictures, several of them from different angles, of the stock separated from the action.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have a kimber Montana 84l and secretly covet the forbes. I don't need one and the weight drop isn't that much but I will likely find an excuse to get one anyway.

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    Tuff choice.

    I know, when sheep hunting, every 1/2 oz. seems worth saving, but it ain't gonna be easy, no matter what kinda rifle you pack.

    If I just HAD to have an extremely light weight rifle, Personally, I wouldn't choose either, partly because I don't like the stock designs. They're both pretty much the same.

    I seen a Weatherby Ultra Light in 280 Rem. that would suit me fine. IIRC, It didn't have a short barrel either.

    I'd like to see some real world info on how well these skinny barrels shoot.

    Smitty of the North

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    Try to check out one of the Ascents before you commit to that one. I know that some like them, but on the one I played with the fluting on the bolt make for a very "rachety" feel when working the action. I much preferred the standard 84L. YMMV

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have 2 Kimber MAs mine is a 30-06 and was a shooter and fed well straight from the box. The wife's 280AI needed the magazine box fitted and polished. Adjusted the trigger on both and both need loctite added to the firing pin set screw as they both came loose and allowed for soft primer strikes.

    I'm just not a push to feed guy, like being able to lock the bolt down, 3 position safety.





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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boliep View Post
    ....

    Lately their have been some complaints about the finishing work on the Forbes rifle. Especially in the bedding area. Check out what you buy carefully for cosmetic situations. If you do it online be sure to ask for quality pictures, several of them from different angles, of the stock separated from the action.
    Good advice here, many complaints about Forbes out-the-door quality right now.
    I'm a lefty and badly desire an all stainless LH 20B, but I won't do so until I'm assured of the QC problems resolved.

    As far as an Ascent...can't imagine why a guy would buy one unless he has money rolling in and a deep obsession for high-priced gear.

    There was a Montana .308 listed here in the classifieds two months ago for $700. I have the same gun for my wife, with a few titanium tweaks and a total cost of $1000, she has a tack driver in the 4lb's range. A guy will spend another $800 for a heavier gun and 'digitized camo' for the Ascent.
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    As far as an Ascent...can't imagine why a guy would buy one unless he has money rolling in and a deep obsession for high-priced gear.
    Thanks,, I have both... No need to insult. I know you are smarter than I, you are a teacher after all.

    The main difference with the Mountain Ascent and the plain Kimbers is the "Brake", it is the brake that makes that MA more accurate in a light rifle. Light rifles are not known to be one hole accurate or easy to shoot.
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    I have a Forbes 30-06 and I don't have any regrets. It shoots great with factory 150 TTSXs and 165 partitions. If you want the inside of the stock to look as good as the outside, don't buy it. That is the biggest complaint that I hear. But I buy rifles to shoot and bounce off alders, so I could care less what the inside of the stocks looks like. The finish on the barrel and action has held up great.It has been on 3 backpack hunts and strapped to the ATV for some time. Compared to my a-bolt 270, this thing feels like a feather on my pack. Ready to head out the door (sling, scope cover, loaded) it weighed 6 lb 10 oz.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Thanks,, I have both... No need to insult. I know you are smarter than I, you are a teacher after all.

    The main difference with the Mountain Ascent and the plain Kimbers is the "Brake", it is the brake that makes that MA more accurate in a light rifle. Light rifles are not known to be one hole accurate or easy to shoot.
    No insult was intended, Steve. One only has to read various forums to see guys tripping over themselves for $1000 rain gear ensembles or $2k rifles that can be equalled (and exceeded) quite easily.
    And yes, the brake is nice, Renee's Montana is equipped with one. It was already installed on the rifle when I bought it.
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    0321Tony,
    The Mountain Ascent in the 84M model only comes in a .308 Win.. - I just checked their website. At 4# 13 oz. in the MA, you are saving 5 ounces over the standard 84M Montana which you CAN get in a 7mm-08. Here you will be saving about $200 when compared to the Forbes 20B. I had two 24 B's in 30-06, they shot very well but I am a 3 position safety guy and like CRF. Plus the shorter more compact grip allowed the trigger guard to hit my middle finger if I wasn't careful. I sold them both after getting a smack on the middle finger with an existing bruise - I was cured. Good luck.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Every *owner* comment I've read concerning the weight of the MA is that the factory is putting out unrealistic numbers regarding the weight of the ascent. If they are 4'13", great, thats a tasty weight; but every person I have read from states that their gun came in heavier (sometimes much heavier) than advertised and expected.
    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    0321Tony,The Mountain Ascent in the 84M model only comes in a .308 Win.. - I just checked their website. At 4# 13 oz. in the MA, you are saving 5 ounces over the standard 84M Montana which you CAN get in a 7mm-08. Here you will be saving about $200 when compared to the Forbes 20B. I had two 24 B's in 30-06, they shot very well but I am a 3 position safety guy and like CRF. Plus the shorter more compact grip allowed the trigger guard to hit my middle finger if I wasn't careful. I sold them both after getting a smack on the middle finger with an existing bruise - I was cured. Good luck.
    Proud to be an American!

  14. #14
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default Forbes or mountain ascent

    84L in -06. 3oz below MFG weight. For less than the cost of a MA, I could get this down to equal weight.

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    that is the same my 84L 30-06 weighted when I got it and I replaced the trigger gruard and it dropped a little more. I would say it group around 1" - 1 1/2" I am looking into bedding the full lenght of the barrel. I put a heavy buisness under the barrel and it seemed to help a three group stay together. It seems many time I get a little bit of a flyer on the third shot of a three shot string. Over all I am happy with my kimber and went into it wanting the CRF action knowing if it did not shoot well I could replace the barrel and have alot of work done before I broke the price range of a custom gun in the same weight.how ever mine has developed some surface rust that I have not cleaned yet because I still have hunting trips planned and will take it apart when I am done I may even have it coated.

  16. #16

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    If the lightest weight is the most important priority then it is a simple matter of looking at specs. I'm like Stid2677, lock a cocked bolt down and have a 3 position safety.

  17. #17

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    I don't need 3 shots touching for my hunting rifle given the distances I shoot at I've come to realize. With standard 165 nosler custom factory loads my wife can get .75" groups (only 3 shot groups granted) and with the same factory ammo mine is right under an inch. Really for me 1.5" is good enough for my hunting purposes so both my Kimbers are much better than that.

    I picked up my wife a Kimber .308 Montana for less than $900 to the door earlier this year and it shoots as I mentioned before slightly better than the one I bought new. Stainless is pretty important to me as they are more rust resistant "not proof" than the Forbes certainly. Just depends on what you got.

    Here is a pic of my tricked out Kimber...granted I lost another .2 of an oz since this pic by swapping to a TI bolt to give it a little more flair and custom look. Just wanted to set it up for style points as you know the animals wouldn't dare to be killed with a factory Tikka that is nearly 1.5 pounds heavier



    That said my brother has a Forbes in 30-06 and its a nice little gun but not stainless and the action isn't as smooth as the Kimbers I have owned (have owned 4 Kimber rifles now) and the trigger was pretty heavy and needed adjusting (easy fix I suppose). He likes it a lot, but he admits if he wasn't a lefty he would have just got a Kimber, but since they don't make a lefty Kimber this was his next best option to upgrade from his Tikka.

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    Comparing a Kimber Montana to a Forbes PRODUCTION is not exactly fair or enlightening since each has it's own set of challenges as well as beauties - Before they were hardly up and running the Forbes had revamped their trigger and I'd bet because Melvin didn't want them to compete that much with his NULA. IMO it ruined the Production version for a HUNTING gun no matter HOW well it shoots (and I have not "heard" that much positive on that) I've hunted with, shot and worked up loads for quite a few Montana's and MOST were accurate enough with some being outstanding (depending on the end goal the owner was after) BUT Kimber's CS runs hot and cold and when it's COLD it's FREEEZING - (on a different note, I recently handled 2 Kimber 1911's that were shipped NIB to a buddy's prolific gun shop that were not as well finished or functional as Rock Island Armory guns) BUT that said, the action features and the quality of the stock put the Kimber Montana way out in front, again IMO - IF the Tikka T3 was to have a bolt unlock feature like the Sako's then the T3 superlight would be a front runner in finish and function

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Tuff choice.

    I know, when sheep hunting, every 1/2 oz. seems worth saving, but it ain't gonna be easy, no matter what kinda rifle you pack.

    If I just HAD to have an extremely light weight rifle, Personally, I wouldn't choose either, partly because I don't like the stock designs. They're both pretty much the same.

    I seen a Weatherby Ultra Light in 280 Rem. that would suit me fine. IIRC, It didn't have a short barrel either.

    I'd like to see some real world info on how well these skinny barrels shoot.

    Smitty of the North

    http://www.impactguns.com/weatherby-...115410941.aspx
    Smitty, I have the same Wby ULW rifle in 7mm Wby. The groups start to open up a bit around after the fifth shot or so in succession without any rest. Mind you, it's just a moderate amount. The groups don't start to look sloppy; they just get maybe 33%-50% bigger. But they start out under an inch at 100yds. If you let it cool down a bit, it tightens up. It's not an issue to me because I haven't shot enough rounds at any animal ever for that to be an issue.

  20. #20
    Member tyrex13's Avatar
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    What cracks me up is you guys spending 4 figures on semi-custom high tech ultra light weight guns and then getting them in ancient long action calibers. Why not maximize the investment and weight savings by getting a short action or WSM? Is a .30-06 that much better than a .308 to necessitate getting a long action ultra light weight mountain rifle?

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