Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Can I thaw and re-freeze halibut and rockfish

  1. #1

    Default Can I thaw and re-freeze halibut and rockfish

    I was on a successful charter and caught some rock- fish and Halibut. The charter company vacuum sealed the fillets in large chunks (3-4 lbs.) My wife and I cannot eat that much at one time. Can I thaw the fillets, cut off what we can eat and re-freeze them?

    Thanks for the information.

  2. #2

    Default

    You can, but I bet you won't like the results. Thawing and refreezing breaks down the cell walls and they lose moisture like crazy. You can literally wring the water out of them like a dishrag. What's left is really rubbery and often doesn't taste so hot either.

    Our solution to such a block is to take a meat saw to the frozen hunk-o-fish. If you don't have one, get a course hacksaw blade, wash it in soap and water to get rid of the oils, then saw away. Only takes a few seconds unless it's a really thick block. Reseal the piece you want for later and toss it back in the freezer.

  3. #3
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default

    You could do that but your fish will not be as good.
    I certainly wouldn't do it myself.
    It is never recommended to thaw and refreeze any kind of meat or fish.
    As a reminder next time be sure and ask for your fish to be sealed in a smaller portion size.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  4. #4
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    3,279

    Default

    That's a great suggestion Brown Bear...good on ya!!!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    950

    Default

    If you let it only slightly thaw, meaning still mostly frozen, you can cut it with a regular knife and put the unused portion back in the freezer without any noticeable affect.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Soldotna, AK
    Posts
    254

    Default

    a heavy duty knife, and a soft mallet or other striking device on a chopping block works fine to. put the knife on the fish and hit the back of the blade.

  7. #7

    Default

    Just a thought....frozen fish does not get better over time, so why not enjoy it while it is still prime? Consider thawing a 3-4 lb package as the op describes and consume the contents over several days. Make some fish tacos, experiment with some fish soup recipes...there's a zillion recipes online for any preparation you could imagine..pan fry some or bake. doesn't take long to use that small amount of fish. All the other suggestions are great...I have a band saw and for long tern storage, I first freeze them solid unwrapped then cut them however I want. Stuff I figure I will use in 90 days gets water glazed once and into ziplock freezer bags. Anything that I figure will be frozen beyond 90 days gets the foodsaver treatment.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    209

    Default

    I found this chart handy, after coming home after 6 days to find the freezer door cracked a couple inches. That was a month ago, and no intestinal issues so far :-)

    http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/frozen_food.html

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    Just a thought....frozen fish does not get better over time, so why not enjoy it while it is still prime? Consider thawing a 3-4 lb package as the op describes and consume the contents over several days. Make some fish tacos, experiment with some fish soup recipes...there's a zillion recipes online for any preparation you could imagine..pan fry some or bake. doesn't take long to use that small amount of fish. All the other suggestions are great...I have a band saw and for long tern storage, I first freeze them solid unwrapped then cut them however I want. Stuff I figure I will use in 90 days gets water glazed once and into ziplock freezer bags. Anything that I figure will be frozen beyond 90 days gets the foodsaver treatment.
    +1

    My typical routine on a large bag of thawed fillets is to cook some that day, while the rest gets puts into portion-sized ziplocs with whatever marinade/seasoning so it really gets the flavors worked in. Only takes a few days to go through that much fish, and it'll be fine in the fridge for that time.

  10. #10

    Default

    Find a new charter company. Chunks that big are just lazy.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Find a new charter company. Chunks that big are just lazy.
    That was my first thought, but I was being polite!

    There is zero excuse for sending clients home with fish in packages too big to use.

  12. #12
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Thawing and refreezing any seafood or fish is never recommended. I like the comments about cutting it while frozen and repackaging it. I've done this in the past with salmon that people have given me and it works great. One other option is to just cook the larger pieces and invite friends to dinner, or use the leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

  13. #13
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    So I've never fished out or Seward/Whittier. Exactly what's the norm for handling clients catches in that neck of the woods? Here most charter boats deliver to a local processor. They pull up to the pier, crane a 1200lb tote down to the boat, one of the kids climbs down the ladder and the guys deal face to face with the procesors. Charter capts don't really deal with the fish here at all. If the client wants 1.5lb packages skin off, that's what they get.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

    Blaze N Abel Charters
    Kodiak, AK
    www.alaska-fish.com
    https://www.facebook.com/BlazeNAbelCharters/?fref=ts

  14. #14
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Anchorville
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Agree with what's been stated thus far, and I have a couple other ideas for you: If you defrost a large portion and only cook some of it that day, it will remain just fine in the refrigerator for another couple days. Also, certain ways of cooking it will keep better / make better leftovers. For instance, if you grill it or bake it, it will be really good that day, but reheating it never yields quite the same result. So what I do with uncooked portions or even leftovers is make fish tacos or a seafood chowder with it. Both really easy to make and will keep at least a week in the fridge while you eat on it and taste just as good as the first day you made it. Chowder is also a good use of fish that gets freezer burned. Most times, it restores it to the point that you can't even tell anything's wrong with it. Always request smaller packages though, for everything. You can always take out two packages, but you can't defrost half of something.
    My signature is awesome.

  15. #15

    Default

    Thanks for all the advise!!

    How about canning the halibut and rockfish. Has anyone done this and if so do you just put water in the jar?

    Thanks again

  16. #16
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,833

    Default

    You won't need to add any water into the jar if you are canning fish. Same with most any protein.

    Were it me, I would put a 1/8 tspn salt into the jar. I haven't tried it, but it would make a good fish Sammy - like a can of tunafish. Mix it up some mayo/salad dressing, a bit of mustard, and some chopped pickles and put it on bread. You could even put that stuff into the jar before canning it and then it'd ready to go.

  17. #17
    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Salt Lake Valley Utah
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishingdiago View Post
    Thanks for all the advise!!

    How about canning the halibut and rockfish. Has anyone done this and if so do you just put water in the jar?

    Thanks again

    I'm sure it applies to those fish as well but when I get close to my next annual Alaska trip out come the pressure canners and the salmon fillets get brined and canned.

    I'll never eat canned tuna again....it's "cat food" compared to canning your own salmon or other fish. Maybe fresh caught and canned tuna would be different.

    I canned some Pacific Cod, too, not so tasty. Plenty firm, just a bit dirty flavored.

    In the pic the darker juice was from a second batch of brown sugar brined coho chunks; otherwise just like bullelkklr said. Just make sure you follow the directions explicitly for canning fish, meat, or poultry. It takes more heat and time. Any jars that don't seal - eat them first as in as soon as they cool down or refrigerate and eat promptly.

    I make salmon salad every weeks and fish tacos galore. Yum!

    PS- no water added to the jars. Use wide mouth pints only. Fill the jars to within an inch. The pressure cooking does the rest. The pin bones dissolve to edible like whole tinned sardines. Drain the juice, mix up with mayo and relish or chow chow spread on crackers, tortillas, bread...add your favorite hot sauce and cold beverage.... wowzers! I'm hungry.


  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishingdiago View Post
    Thanks for all the advise!!

    How about canning the halibut and rockfish. Has anyone done this and if so do you just put water in the jar?

    Thanks again
    Halibut are awfully dry if canned without help. We add a tablespoon of olive oil per pint, and it's dandy.

    "Rockfish" depends on the species. Blacks and duskies are very oil, surprising enough, and don't require any added oil. Don't make the mistake of canning spring leftovers from the freezer though. The slightest whiff of oxidation or freezer burn turns nasty in a can. Can it fresh, and it's excellent. Helps texture to really pack the jars tight while leaving a little space at the top of the jar.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    summer WI-winter TX
    Posts
    105

    Default

    I also add olive oil when I can my salmon'

  20. #20
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,257

    Default

    Agree with all that's been said here, with one BIG exception. We never drain the juice, as Carolina boy suggested. Man that stuff is the essence of awesomeness. If you don't want it in whatever you are making, keep it for fish stock for all kinds of good recipes.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
    _________________________________________________

    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •