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Thread: Sleeping on tundra / tussocks

  1. #1
    Member AKFF's Avatar
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    Default Sleeping on tundra / tussocks

    Ok - I've searched, back as far as 2007, haven't seen a lot of relevant information in this.
    My son & I are planning on going up the Haul Rd. for caribou sometime about Sept. 5. We'll hike in the 5 miles and set up camp. I've done the hunt with a bow last year, and spent plenty of hours walking on the tundra:
    HOW IN THE WORLD can one sleep in relative comfort on those bowling balls? I don't want to pack cots in. Is it possible (& legal) to flatten out a spot with a shovel (military trenching tool or aluminum pack type shovel for example)? Is there the occasional flat spot on top of a ridge? (If there is, I missed it last year).
    My buddy went in the 5 miles last year & shot his bou, sounded like the most miserable part for him was trying to set up a tent & get comfortable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKFF View Post
    Ok - I've searched, back as far as 2007, haven't seen a lot of relevant information in this.
    My son & I are planning on going up the Haul Rd. for caribou sometime about Sept. 5. We'll hike in the 5 miles and set up camp. I've done the hunt with a bow last year, and spent plenty of hours walking on the tundra:
    HOW IN THE WORLD can one sleep in relative comfort on those bowling balls? I don't want to pack cots in. Is it possible (& legal) to flatten out a spot with a shovel (military trenching tool or aluminum pack type shovel for example)? Is there the occasional flat spot on top of a ridge? (If there is, I missed it last year).
    My buddy went in the 5 miles last year & shot his bou, sounded like the most miserable part for him was trying to set up a tent & get comfortable.
    Not sure about the tundra where you'll be hunting, but I find sleeping on the tundra to be quite comfortable as long as I can find a dry spot.

  3. #3

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    Depends. If you can stand the possibility that the best place is still lumpy, you are good to go. If you need a little help evening out a few spots, get a thicker sleeping pad or stuff a few extra clothes here and there under your pad to even it out. But if you really need flat and can't chance it...take the cot.
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    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    I would look for any little hill or rise that might be potentially dry. some of the little humps have some gravel or at least if youre lucky a flat-ish spot. you can take willow or lumps of tundra and fill in an area big enough for you to sleep in I suppose

  5. #5
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    I fill in lumpy tundra with grass. Like its said, find a slight hill at least, a rock ridge at best, so you can hunt from your camp, an d be relitivly dry. Look for gravel and sand, its easily smoothed out.

    Good hunting places have always been used by hunters, some places for thousands of years, 'cause they dont move much, and your likely to find a well placed and 'broken in' camping spot, with a nice ground to set up on.

    I prefer packing grass between the 'heads, out on the tundra, its free, all over the place and dry. A couple hours into making a really good bed will pay off int he rest you get from the work your sure to do if your successful or not, walking on Tundra is work.

    A word from experience with Tundra and Caribou hunting; Place your steps BETWEEN the 'Heads, never atop, its an ankle killer with a load. And use a walking stick. I carry a 1X 1 rounded , 5 foot long hickory shaft, smoothed one with a nice iron tip (its a harpoon in real life) and a tapered rear end,
    but you use it while packing the load to rest against, so you dont have to sit,............can also be a tent pole, a boat pole,helps to get a fella up to his feet alone, especially a loaded down, meat packing kinda guy, also helps to gauge the depth of the Tundra, especially low, swampy areas, helps to mark a location of things left on the Tundra ( it ALL looks the same) so you can get back to your second or more load, as well as being handy to beat flightless birds or use as a shooting stick, its a VERY handy item for the tundra trekker.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member AKFF's Avatar
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    Grass! That's the idea I hadn't thought of. Most of the rest I've read our learned the hard way, but hopefully grass will be the answer I'm looking for. Thanks stanger!

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