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Thread: What's a good jigging reel for Halibut?

  1. #1
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    Default What's a good jigging reel for Halibut?

    Time for me to pick up a dedicated halibut jigging reel. I am thinking about an Avet LX loaded 4:1 with 50lb braid. What reel do you use for jigging halibut and what wt line do you use? I use jigs from 8-28oz. I dont want to spend a ton of money on one but i want a good one. Any suggestions are appreciated!

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    i have 3 penn 114h senators and they are an awesome halibut winch


    especially on 100# plus fish
    i like the spectra line in 80#
    also have a shimano okuma that is a decent reel.
    i have got two of my penn reels on ebay for 84 bucks.
    pretty sure you cant beat that with an avet.

    Sent from my SCH-R760 using Tapatalk 2

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    My new favorite jigging rod/reel combo is the Seeker 6'6" 40# class rod (BCBW659H) and the Avet JX 4.6. I have several LX reels, but I really like this new JX I picked up. It's a little narrower than the LX, but still easily holds 300yds of 80# braid (the 50# stuff is too hard on my hands, so I like 80#), and has enough drag to get the job done.


    Dad and I each boated nice, 100+ pound halibut this summer with jigging rods. Dad used one of my older Loomis musky rods and an LX 4.6 reel, and I used the new combo listed above. We were fishing in 300ft of water, so we had plenty of work to get them into the boat, but the rods & reels worked admirably. The results:





  4. #4

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    I have been replacing my internationals with trq's (penn). Not sure what you budget is but you could pick up a new penn trq25 or 30 for under 350 on ebay. More drag and capacity than you should need running 50lb (I run 65 or 80 braid for a tiny bit more abrasion resistance and peace of mind).

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I have a Avet SX that I bought for jigging with a Shimano Trevala rod, it doesn't reel in quick enough (30" per crank) nor have enough drag power.
    I have an Avet 4/0 t speed and it is just too big, but it works (paired with a Lamiglas 5610)
    I just picked up an Avet HX with 80lb braid (37" per crank)and a Okuma Cedros rod. Pretty good halibut rig, but I didn't pay attention to the weight rating on the Okuma stick and it maxes out at 200 grams jig weight, and it is too flimsy. Okuma has an Alaska Halibut Cedros jig rod and a regular Cedrod jig rod for up to 325 grams and I believe that is great.

    My next dedicated halibut jigging reel is the the Avet JX two speed (46"/22")but it is more money than the LX (36" per crank or 46" per crank in the 6:1) and load it with 65lb braid (530 yds). Both the JX and LX are the same (just the LX has a higher line capacity).

    Having a lighter setup is a kick for halibut. Especially when most of your fish are in the 40-80lb class. When most of your fish are smaller the bigger setups are just overkill. When using jigs for halibut (like the Williamson Vortex or Shimano Speed Jigs) those lighter weight setups are awesome!

    Sobie2

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    This spring, I got myself an Avet MXJ 6/4 (2-speed), loaded it with Daiwa 80# boat braid and put it on the Okuma Cedros. I love it.
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Another vote for the Avet JX, I've got three of them. I've found in jigging reels when you can get down to 20 oz the rod is much easier to jig all day, the jx has enough reel capacity for over 300yds of braid and its easier to stack line on a narrower reel. Also a narrower reel doesn't torque the rod as much when reeling up.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Member Alan Sloka's Avatar
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    My jigging reel is a Penn 25lw. I like the level wind feature, especially for newbies. Plenty of drag (25 lbs). Will hold 300 yds 65# braid, all metal, smooth and light.

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Give the Diawa Saltist LD a look. I really enjoyed mine this year and the price is not too bad. I have not tried one, but if your budget is not in that range the Penn squalls look interesting.

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    I've been running okuma magda pro mx 30 ex on my jigging rods,( shimano trevalas), and they work great. Have good built in line counters and cost $50. I also really like these on my trolling rods, great for divers and downriggers!

  11. #11

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    If you want to be the first one down, first one up, and have more drag than needed I would recommend a quality spinning rig. I do understand it is hard for people to let go of the concept of conventional reels/rods but the spinning gear is so much more effective IMO.



    And using Diawa PE lines usually 70#. Very silky and no grinding through the guides like a saw as noticed with just about every other braid. My rod of choice is a Shimano Terez 7'8" 50-100# with a Fin Nor Offshore 5500 reel. This combo can put the heat on anything that swims here and is generally made for much bigger fish like Tuna and such. Kinda nice to be able to cast ahead in a drift and make bottom where no conventional can.


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  12. #12

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    The old Penn 340 is a heck of a reel, and I'll take those all day long.

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    Member Albradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    My new favorite jigging rod/reel combo is the Seeker 6'6" 40# class rod (BCBW659H) and the Avet JX 4.6. I have several LX reels, but I really like this new JX I picked up. It's a little narrower than the LX, but still easily holds 300yds of 80# braid (the 50# stuff is too hard on my hands, so I like 80#), and has enough drag to get the job done.


    Dad and I each boated nice, 100+ pound halibut this summer with jigging rods. Dad used one of my older Loomis musky rods and an LX 4.6 reel, and I used the new combo listed above. We were fishing in 300ft of water, so we had plenty of work to get them into the boat, but the rods & reels worked admirably. The results:

    How much did that set up cost? Looks like I may have just found my 2015 halibut jig rig lol.
    There's a fine line between fishing....

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    Member Kingfisher10's Avatar
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    I'm thinking I might try a Daiwa Saltist next summer, anyone tried them out?
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albradley View Post
    How much did that set up cost? Looks like I may have just found my 2015 halibut jig rig lol.
    You're looking at about $500. $250 for the reel, I think the rods are up to $220 and 300ys of braid is going to set you back at least $30.

    For some types of jigs I prefer the action of the Shimano Trevala XXH rods, but I'v had a pair of the Blue Lighting rods for ~5 years and other than the guide inserts popping out on occasion they've been great rods.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    I also use the AVET JX. I think it is the all the reel you need and just the right size for the jigging we do.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Sloka View Post
    My jigging reel is a Penn 25lw. I like the level wind feature, especially for newbies. Plenty of drag (25 lbs). Will hold 300 yds 65# braid, all metal, smooth and light.




    The Fathoms are great for the price. I've got 3 of the 25lw for salmon and 2 of the 40LW for bottom fishing. Both have handle big fish with no real problems. Comparing them to an Avet is not fair though as they have multi pieced cast frame and star drags as opposed to single piece machined frames and lever drags.

    My personal reel is an Accurate Fury 600N with 80 lb braid with 4:1 ratio for cranking up big fish. It's a hell of a reel.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    There are so many good reels out there. My favorite that I have is a shimano tyrnos. I prefer lever drag over star drags.
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