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Thread: Hunting buddy or tips/advice

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting buddy or tips/advice

    Hi! I just moved up to Anchorage in March from Colorado, and looking to get started hunting ducks up here. I have been hunting mostly mallards with a few canadian geese for the last 4 years in Colorado. All of it has been sitting at small ponds, trying to learn how to call them in. So, I am new to AK, hunting marshes and rivers, as well as from boats or ATVs. I have a small decoy spread (12 floating mallards, 12 goose land decoys, goose flapper).

    I just bought a 16' Lowe jonboat with a 40hp Merc jet on Thursday. From what I'm reading, it sounds like it might be less than ideal for Rabbit Slough? I took it up 20mile yesterday as a test run, and it ran great! Anyways, I'm looking for either a hunting buddy or someone that would be willing to help me get started up here. I didn't hunt growing up, so everything I know is what I've learned in books, forums, and videos. I am a responsible, respectful hunter that will work hard to earn some kills. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Alaska Waterfowl world of wonders..lol

    Kidding aside, SEARCH THIS FORUM.
    It is a grueling process up here. Limited areas with not many willing to share and wanting you to do your own DD.
    YES..that boat is not ideal for rabbit slough. although there are many areas you can park up and down it, hike in to many of the potholes and have a great/poor shoot depending on area. Sounds like 20 mile, or even the bigger rivers north would provide more opportunities.

    Good luck and hope to see you on the marsh.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    a2thak, WELCOME TO THE WATERFOWL FORUM
    Your boat is fine for what it is. It can get you up and down rabbit slough just dandy, it can get you up and down the Knik also. Like Hugh says, park the boat (watch out it doesn't get left high and dry when the tide goes out) and walk in to the ponds, lots of them all along the slough. Placer is another one to try, just past Portage. Jim creek can be good but lots of areas there the grass and weeds will plug up your pump. Without the boat, Cottonwood creek can be great, but you have to be able to hike 5-8 miles there, or have a ATV (stay on the trail). I learned by myself also, but it was fun. Post as many questions as you like, lots on here will help guide you. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Hey I'm pretty new as well but if your looking for a new partner for a couple trips out message me.

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    Welcome to AK.

    If you want to go scout or go hunt, give me a shout. I sold my boat and haven't brought my new one up from the lower 48 yet.
    There are a couple spot to go scout that silvers can be caught.

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    Member AK DUCKMAN's Avatar
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    As for Rabbit slough, high and dry is the least or your worries. It's more like finding your boat at the bottom of the slough will most likely be the end result. I've seen more then my fare share of boats go down out there. The out going tide is not your friend so pay attention to your tide book and note it's not the same time as Anchorage about an hour diff. Also it will help if you know the rules of the road so to speak. Boats going with current have right of way ( less control ) as do smaller boats, canoes, ect that you could swamp. And try not to swamp boats parked on the side of the slough, fastest way to make enemies. I only say this because there are still many that haven't figured this out yet. And if your thinking about hitting it on opening day you better be out there the day before, and with it being on Monday this year you better get there Saturday AM. opening last year was a joke, you couldn't even turn your trailer around in the parking lot. You all have fun and play nice I'll be sleeping in this year, I don't need the head ache.

  7. #7
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    I hear ya brother..you will be missed. I'll be thinking about ya when I shoot Nina's ashes across the marsh..

    Sure I'll call you later and fill you in on the fun...






    Quote Originally Posted by AK DUCKMAN View Post
    As for Rabbit slough, high and dry is the least or your worries. It's more like finding your boat at the bottom of the slough will most likely be the end result. I've seen more then my fare share of boats go down out there. The out going tide is not your friend so pay attention to your tide book and note it's not the same time as Anchorage about an hour diff. Also it will help if you know the rules of the road so to speak. Boats going with current have right of way ( less control ) as do smaller boats, canoes, ect that you could swamp. And try not to swamp boats parked on the side of the slough, fastest way to make enemies. I only say this because there are still many that haven't figured this out yet. And if your thinking about hitting it on opening day you better be out there the day before, and with it being on Monday this year you better get there Saturday AM. opening last year was a joke, you couldn't even turn your trailer around in the parking lot. You all have fun and play nice I'll be sleeping in this year, I don't need the head ache.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    All- Thanks for all the advice so far. I have already spent a lot of time searching and browsing the forum and there is a lot of info on here. JR and Farout-I'll give y'all a shout. I don't have any hunting buddies up here yet, so I'm definitely looking for people to hunt with!

    Duckman-I'll be out of town opening day, so I won't be joining in on that circus. However, can you elaborate more about the outgoing tide is not my friend? I am new to this tidal atmosphere, so still learning the ropes. I've read on here the issues with the tides when you park a boat on the bank and then hike to hunt , but haven't found a clear "safe" way to do it. I assumed the safest way would be to come in a little after high tide, pull the boat up the bank a little, then when I'm done hunting, slide the boat down the bank into the lower water. Is that not ideal?

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  10. #10
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    There are two ways to survive the tidal mess.
    One is to pull your boat up on flat ground.
    Second is to anchor your boat in the middle of the slough off a buoy, boat should be on a "Cut Bank" or high bank to prevent it getting stuck on the silt at low tide. Meaning...get it to parallell the shorline about 4-5ft off the high bank..ususally this allows for room for the boat to rise and lower with tides..also..leave enough rope to accmodate for this as well. maybe an extra 20ft or one of those anchor buddy systems.

    If your boat gets on the silt out there IT WILL NOT FLOAT as water comes in. It will remain stuck to it and the tide will take your boat. I have seen 12-18ft boats get ripped out to sea in that slough. Have seen Engine props get worked into the silt nad guys had to take the motor off to prevent from losing the boat as well. There are tricks..but respect it.

    Take the extra mins to take the motor off, and haul the boat up until you get a chance to hunt with someone experienced out there.
    The last tip is throw a milk crate in your boat..it could save your life. That silt is like quicksand and you will get stuck in it. many waders and lives have been lost here in Alaska due to that stuff.

    Be safe, and never take the tides for granted out there. They fluctuate from 34ft to 10. In September we get the 34-35 footers..they can be brutal if you have no idea what you are doing. later on when it gets colder in October it is more stable around 20fters..but the tides bring in huge chunks of ice the size of cars up the slough. This will take out your boat in a heartbeat...not to mention if you portage over..now your stuck until the tide goes out because of those huge chunk of ice blocking you in.

    All this in the name of a few birds...lol

    IT's a passion/obsession..and only for the few.

    Hugh


    Quote Originally Posted by a2thak View Post
    All- Thanks for all the advice so far. I have already spent a lot of time searching and browsing the forum and there is a lot of info on here. JR and Farout-I'll give y'all a shout. I don't have any hunting buddies up here yet, so I'm definitely looking for people to hunt with!

    Duckman-I'll be out of town opening day, so I won't be joining in on that circus. However, can you elaborate more about the outgoing tide is not my friend? I am new to this tidal atmosphere, so still learning the ropes. I've read on here the issues with the tides when you park a boat on the bank and then hike to hunt , but haven't found a clear "safe" way to do it. I assumed the safest way would be to come in a little after high tide, pull the boat up the bank a little, then when I'm done hunting, slide the boat down the bank into the lower water. Is that not ideal?
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  11. #11
    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    Almost lost mine


    Sent while partying

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    I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
    but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

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    Dang, that's what I'm trying to avoid! So what's the potential issue with coming in on high tide, beaching it on the bank? That way, it is beached above high tide, and couldn't get flooded out. Issue with it getting stuck in the silt, having to wait until the next high tide?

    BTW my boat looks almost exactly like yours.

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    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    No issues..but you have to remember that high tide is a constant clock issue which moves to the right one hour daily. So what might have worked yesterday will not work next week or in a few days..not accomodating. at 3am in the morning at the ramp..it might be low tide..only a few layout style boats with the proper engines might be able to get down to where we hunt..short shafts might not...so you have to wait until around 9am before coming in or try going slow not to rip off your engine on that tree lying in the water...lol

    If your boats looks like his..then its only a 12-14fter and light enough to pull up.

    Just take it easy, lots of grass in the first part that will jam up a jet. pull your boat up on high ground or use the system I described earlier. Regardless...you will be introduced to Alaska Waterfowl the hard way.. you will either sink or swim.




    Quote Originally Posted by a2thak View Post
    Dang, that's what I'm trying to avoid! So what's the potential issue with coming in on high tide, beaching it on the bank? That way, it is beached above high tide, and couldn't get flooded out. Issue with it getting stuck in the silt, having to wait until the next high tide?

    BTW my boat looks almost exactly like yours.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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