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Thread: Meat hanging minimum?

  1. #1
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    Default Meat hanging minimum?

    Quick question: Is one day enough for having my moose hung? I scored a spike early yesterday morning and it was hung by 10am. I don't have a great cold place for it in our near 70 degree days here in Kenai, but it is shaded, dry and breezy. My goal is to reduce spoilage and want to get it packaged ASAP. Is one day enough for a little spike or should I try for more? Thanks for any and all advice!

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    It's plenty...get it dealt with ASAP!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    It's plenty...get it dealt with ASAP!!

    What he said ^^^^^^^^^^! There is no "minimum" for hanging meat, what is important is caring for it "properly", hang time is a luxury when conditions permit.

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    Member AKmyles's Avatar
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    Get your knives and let the meat fly! That spike is gonna be delicious!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Get it done and in the freezer.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Sharpening my knives right now. Thanks for the advice!

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenaiphisher View Post
    Sharpening my knives right now. Thanks for the advice!
    By the way...CONGRATS!!!!!

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    Thanks for the kudos. This one is just a freezer filler, but my first moose so I'm pumped.

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    Congratulations on a job well done!

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    Aging is essentially controlled rot. Since the weather in the late summer/early fall is considerably warm, the aging happens much faster in the winter time. In the summer, I will shoot a deer and let it hang overnight; or else if I had quartered it I'll put the bag of meat in the fridge overnight, and then process and freeze the next day. However, in the winter time when the temperature is much lower, the aging process takes longer. I'll hang my deer 3-5 days typically in the winter time depending on temperature and weather. You could easily hang it a week in the winter and still be fine.

    Sometimes it's convenient for me to let a deer hang for days at a time; especially when I'm preoccupied with other important things...like shooting more deer!

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Congrats on your first and with a bow! Well done.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Have never 'hung' any of my meat any longer than it took to get it out of the field. Everything gets processed ASAP after getting home...unless it was frozen in the field, in which case I might hang it outside frozen until such time as I could get to it (still within a day or two). All our caribou have been taken in winter and were typically frozen solid within a couple hours of gutting. Always processed them partially thawed and then refroze them immediately. Some folks like to hang their meat; I don't see the attraction.
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    Member nooksack's Avatar
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    iofthethetaiga,
    Have you experienced hardening when the meat freezes that fast? The back-strap and loin of my moose partially froze last year and they were very tough. I thought it just was due to his size and age but then I came home and researched and learned about cold hardening and that seemed to make sense.

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    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
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    I think we should point out something as this is his firstmoose, if you CAN hang the meat Ė you SHOULD. We hang moose for a week if we can,but up north the garage stays around 40-45 degrees in September, which is justabout a perfect hanging temp. Hanging ittenderizes the meat as the aging process breaks it down, leaving finer tablefare in the end. Thereís a reason there were always sides of beef hanging forRocky Balboa to punch at the meat packing plantÖ.
    That being said, you donít have that option at 70 degrees,but thatís the cost of hunting big game in basically the summer, lol. Luckily for you, he is a spike and his 2 year oldbody is probably already a tender delight to put on the plate. Congrats on yourfirst bull, a favorite meal of mine is celebratory tenderloin steaks!
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  15. #15
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nooksack View Post
    iofthethetaiga,
    Have you experienced hardening when the meat freezes that fast?
    No. I've heard that talked about here before, but I've never had that experience.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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  16. #16

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    Hi Friend, You should of asked me Sunday at small group, I'm full of advice. What others said about getting it done is correct and hanging meat that is going into a burger pile is a waste of time. I always start with the rib meat, followed by the front and then rear quarters. The Kenai weather is just to warm for good meat hanging. I have cut up a bunch of moose and caribou and should of offered to help you. Indian Valley Meats has good information on taking care of wild game and I don't know of many who have dealt with as much game meat as them. Big congrats on the moose kill.

    Steve

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    My first Deer back in 1963 was an awesome experience. I couldn't wait to have a steak. I don't think it had cooled off yet and it took 3 days of mouthwash to get the bloody taste out of my mouth.LOL

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Short answer: hanging to get a "glaze" or a "skin" on the flesh helps trap hair/ dirt or other unwanted junk and is easier to take off when butchering. This process can be speeded by aiming a box fan at the hanging animals. And it also keeps the Buggs off


    Some times a local meat locker will "hang" meat for a nominal fee so you can pick it up later. Purely from a chemical standpoint, "hanging" meat yeilds a better product.... But to do it safely the temp and humidity are closely monitored. I would take a few steaks and put them in the fridge lightly covered to see if you can see a tenderizing or flavoring effect.... Ideally I think the air has to be at 70% humidity and 34f.... I think the two points to hanging meat is to allow rigamortis to set in, to help bleed the animal and so the exposed flesh can form a "skin" I feel that the skin helps to trap stray hair, dirt and junk picked up in the feild. This "skin" is easy to filet off and dispose of.... It is also the layer that insects have been touching or any stomach bile.

  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGAKSTUFF View Post
    That being said, you donít have that option at 70 degrees,but thatís the cost of hunting big game in basically the summer, lol.
    The key is to get a good crust on the meat first. We hung deer in hotter weather than that and it did fine for a few days. BUT.....it was very dry, had bled well, and had a good crust on it. That being said, hanging is not absolutely necessary, but I prefer it.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by nooksack View Post
    iofthethetaiga,
    Have you experienced hardening when the meat freezes that fast? The back-strap and loin of my moose partially froze last year and they were very tough. I thought it just was due to his size and age but then I came home and researched and learned about cold hardening and that seemed to make sense.
    The meat was still in rigor. Of course the first rule of meat care is to not let it go sour. From there it is desirable to age the meat a minimum of 72 hrs before freezing to let the chemical bonds producing rigor mortis to release . After rigor mortis has dissipated, all further aging is truely a controlled rot which can be especially important to produce chewable meat from some animals.

    While it is preferred to age past rigor before freezing, I have often frozen meat before this point and have success is continuing the aging process after thawing. Thaw and keep in the fridge for a few days....

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