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Thread: Repairing a side wall leak using slime or a patch?

  1. #1
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    Default Repairing a side wall leak using slime or a patch?

    One of my 4-wheeler tire has a slow leak at the sidewall about three inches from the rim because of a 2-3 inch cracked. My options are to use a can of slime, put a large patch on the inside over the crack or replace the tire.

    The smart thing to do is to replace the tire but this is the first time I used the atv in four years and don't know when it will be use again if ever. If I do and the crack split, need I say more.

    Just how good is slime or a patch repairing a side wall leak or is there no long turn fix.

  2. #2

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    Fix a flat or slime probably won't work on the sidewall. The slime is usually forced and held in place by centrifugal force, of which there is none on the sidewall.

    Patching a sidewall is possible, though not easy. Patching ATV tires in general is tough, but I have done it. Usually a "plug patch" works best, as it keeps the debris and moisture out of the hole and off the sealing surface of the patch. It being the weathercracks that are leaking indicates to me that the tire is old and more brittle, so patching at all will be a chore and will probably ruin the inner liner of the tire.

    If it were my tire, I'd put a tube in it. With it being a low pressure operation, the tube is unlikely to cause the sidewall to completely rupture when aired up. Almost every size of ATV tire has a tube available, which can be found at most tire shops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ninja View Post
    If it were my tire, I'd put a tube in it. With it being a low pressure operation, the tube is unlikely to cause the sidewall to completely rupture when aired up. Almost every size of ATV tire has a tube available, which can be found at most tire shops.
    I did not know there were tube available for ATV tires. THANK YOU, THANK YOU

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Tubes are great but have there own issues. Make sure you keep the air pressure up or it can pinch the tube and ruin it. For holes I use plugs and they seem to work pretty good. I actually have two plugs in a hole on the sidewall from two three years ago and have never had to add any air. For cracks I would tube it, or as you mentioned, replace it, like I should do with mine.
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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    [QUOTE=alaskabliss;1415905]Tubes are great but have there own issues. Make sure you keep the air pressure up or it can pinch the tube and ruin it.

    I called TDS in Anchorage and they had them for 16.50$
    Before tubeless tires I install tubes all the times, so I should be able to do it right. I still appreciate you mentioning it.

  6. #6

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    Yeah, a pinched tube will go flat just as well as it did before the tube, then you're dead in the water. Luckily, tubes are easy enough to install yourself, and a can of fix-a-flat will "air up" a tire. Stuff sucks, but it has its uses.

  7. #7
    Member Anythingalaska's Avatar
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    When you put your plugs in, put each one in so they are like a 'U' in the hole, not just one diameter in the hole. We've put up to 6 plugs in the same hole with a lot of rubber cement and had it hold for...quite a while. Fix-a-flat or Slime won't work; I wouldn't even consider it an option on a hole that big. A 2-3" gash is pretty substantial. I'de say your better off replacing the tire, rather than being really p*ssed of when your out riding in the middle of nowhere and your repair fails.

  8. #8
    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Not sure what size your tires are but there are quite a few stock tires on Craig's list. If you are patient there are pretty good deals to be found. Good luck
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  9. #9

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    What type of tire and size do you need? I just upgraded my stock tires, front left had two nice holes in the sidewall from a piece of steel. Carlisle 489, 8x25-12. So one of the fronts is still good and both rears are good, 10x25-12.

    I ran on the plugs and slime for about a year.

  10. #10
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    My fronts are 25x8 -12 and the rears are 25x10-12

    I put a tube in the tire and so I don't need to replace it. Thank for letting me know they were available.

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