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Thread: Trolling Outfit

  1. #1

    Default Trolling Outfit

    I'm new to trolling and was going to check out Cabelas for line counter reels. Then I wondered if I needed a special rod for trolling. Do you need a special rod for downriggers or will any trolling rod work? I have a manual downrigger but haven't put it on the boat yet. I do have an 8'6" Lamiglass Kenai pro baitcaster rated for 30# line and 2 oz lure. Is that suitable? I'd appreciate any suggestions for an outfit that would be serviceable for a newbie without breaking the bank. My neighbor works there and gave me a discount coupon that needs to be used by Sunday...so I better get on it. Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I'm new to trolling and was going to check out Cabelas for line counter reels. Then I wondered if I needed a special rod for trolling. Do you need a special rod for downriggers or will any trolling rod work? I have a manual downrigger but haven't put it on the boat yet. I do have an 8'6" Lamiglass Kenai pro baitcaster rated for 30# line and 2 oz lure. Is that suitable? I'd appreciate any suggestions for an outfit that would be serviceable for a newbie without breaking the bank. My neighbor works there and gave me a discount coupon that needs to be used by Sunday...so I better get on it. Thanks for any help!
    Your Lamiglass will work. True that they do in-fact market "down-rigger" rods, but your standard salmon rods will do just fine.
    Last edited by Frostbitten; 07-18-2014 at 15:12. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Yes, they make specailized rods for downriggers, no they are an absolute, but the right tool for the job makes it easier. Lots of guys, myself included use or have used the Steehead/Salmon river style casting rods with great success, which is what you have there. With riggers there's no need for a line counter. So yes, what you have there will probably work just fine, I use to Run kenai Specails rated for 10-20lb line that were 8 1/2 foot. Now i'm running the Lamiglass CG90DR's and love them, matched with Diawa 47H's loaded with 20lb mono and never had a problem with Kings upto 70lbs in the salt.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Gary, I've use very similar rods when I use downriggers. They'll work just fine. The line counter reels probably aren't much help for downriggers (assuming your downrigger has it's own depth counter)...but the line counter reels can be very useful when mooching for silvers (getting back to a depth you've been catching fish at, or trying to hit a target from something on the fishfinder).

    For a downrigger rod, I really like ugly sticks...not only for their price but because you can bend them way, way over and when they release the rod snap helps take up slack asap.
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  5. #5

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    Yup on the rod, but I kinda question the line counter reel unless you'll be using for lots more than downriggers. I relish our linecounters (Diawa Saltists), but for mooching and trolling off the rigger. Nothing sezz you can't use them on the rigger, but you won't need them. I'm using plain levelwind Saltists for the downriggers.

    Heck, long as I'm talking I'll go on to my preference in rods. Got the Lami everyone else likes on riggers, but they're just soft for me, both for controlling big kings and for riggers. I'm using graphite rods (9' Loomis) on the riggers. They crank down real tight with a heck of a bend in them on the rigger, as far as Lami fiberglass for sure. But when those things pop free with a fish, they really come up with some authority. Our hookup rate jumped noticeably when we gave the Lami's to a friend who likes em and went back to the Loomis we use for trolling without the rigger, too. Different rods for different boats for sure, but that's what you'll see on ours.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    And here I thought maybe you thinking something on the lines of

  7. #7

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    Thanks for the ideas, guys! I've resisted mounting the riggers as my extra wide gunnels make a perfect landing for my shrimp pots and I didn't want to mess up that situation. The other reason was that I couldn't figure out how the drag adjusts on either of them so basically just blew the whole thing off. I just now have discovered that its all in the handle...DOH! One is a Big Jon, the other a Cannon easy troll. Any thoughts on which is the better unit? I also have one of those removable Scotty bases. I guess if the rod I have would work ok, the 6501 Abu reel should, too. Sounds like I might be close to set up if I mount one of the riggers.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    I've used the next step up manual cannon (the Uni-troll?), and always liked it. While the mag-troll, powered units always made me envious...the manuals are much lighter and easier to stow away when you're not using them if you have limited onboard space.

    If you have flush-mount rod holders in your gunwhales, you can get downrigger mounts that fit into those:
    http://store.cannondownriggers.com/p..._Gimbal_Mounts
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    I've used the next step up manual cannon (the Uni-troll?), and always liked it. While the mag-troll, powered units always made me envious...the manuals are much lighter and easier to stow away when you're not using them if you have limited onboard space.

    If you have flush-mount rod holders in your gunwhales, you can get downrigger mounts that fit into those:
    http://store.cannondownriggers.com/p..._Gimbal_Mounts
    So, MRFISH, I did a little more checking and find that I'll have to modify my Scotty rigger base to make either unit work, but the base won't impede my pot landing zone...so that's good. But a general downrigger question. What happens when you hook a fish? I suppose you need to reel up the rigger weight so the fish doesn't get hung up in it. That was another main concern as I am a one man crew. Kind of hard to reel up 2 things at the same time...I guess a guy could try to keep tension on the fish so it doesn't throw the hook and reel like heck on the rigger to get it out of the way. That's why the line counter reel seemed attractive to me. I've seen formulas online that give ball park depths for amount of line out taking into consideration the weight and type of terminal tackle being used.

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    Member kodiakbound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    That was another main concern as I am a one man crew. Kind of hard to reel up 2 things at the same time...
    I do it all the time, not a big deal. Just keep the motor in gear to help keep tension on the fish while you get the rigger up
    Experience is a hard teacher because you get the test first and the lesson afterwards.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakbound View Post
    I do it all the time, not a big deal. Just keep the motor in gear to help keep tension on the fish while you get the rigger up
    There ya go...exactly why this forum has been such a Godsend for anyone as inexperienced as me. My first thought would have been to kick it out of gear. I only have about a dozen trips under my belt, but each one seems get a little more efficient. I guess patience, practice and paying attention to good advice is the key.

  12. #12

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    Yup on the in-gear if you have other lines out, as in extra anglers. Of course, you can always kick it out of gear and just stop cranking on the rigger if you need to gain line on the fish for a moment or two. If there's a breeze or any chop, I also like to turn the boat broadside with the fish on the upwind side so the breeze and chop help you. It's also an advantage because it keeps your boat from running over the top of the fish in the last minutes before netting it.

    I've watched charters around here that just never stop to fight fish, leaving all the gear in the water and continuing to fish it, counting on the boat's forward motion to keep the fish back a ways until it tires and comes up on the surface. I hate that, but everyone has to run their boat their way.

  13. #13

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    Yo, BrownBear...would you happen to know the model# of the Loomis rod that you mentioned earlier?

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    And here I thought maybe you thinking something on the lines of
    Now that's a TROLLING OUTFIT!! Have ZZ Top's "Sharp Dressed Man" playing in the back of my mind. I could save up for one like this. Always want to look good on the water....

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    Yo, BrownBear...would you happen to know the model# of the Loomis rod that you mentioned earlier?
    It's the SAMR 1084 C on this page. Probably my favorite Loomis rod for trolling, though we like the SAMR 1265 even better for mooching. The SAMR 1265 is a dandy trolling rod too, whether with diving planes or on a downrigger. If I was to buy only one model for all three uses the SAMR 1265 would be my choice. You just can't believe what a good mooching rod it is for kings.

  16. #16

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    Thanks for the info,BB. Read lots of reviews and they all agree with you that both those rods are the bomb! You also mentioned the Saltist reels...like the Loomis, they're a ways out of my price range right now. Wondered if you might be familiar with the Sealines...a notch or 2 down from the Saltist line but still a Daiwa product.

  17. #17

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    I don't have any experience with it. If budget is an issue for you, we did fine for years using Penn or Okuma levelwind reels and Okuma trolling rods. No, they're not as elegant, but they're sure functional and tough. You'll get lots of years of service while slowly changing over to other tackle as you gain more experience. I really like Penn reels for access to parts and easy repair and maintenance. I have some Penn's that are over 40 years old, and I can still get parts for them, and cheap! Talk about a budget stretcher when you can keep your gear going so long and do the work yourself.

  18. #18

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    Well, I built a plate for my Scotty base that will accept both of those old downriggers pictured earlier, a holder for the ball so it doesn't roll all over the place and plan to install the whole business tomorrow. I hope my first rigger exercise doesn't turn into a goat rope. I was reading on the wigglefin swarm thread about using them as a hookless attractor attached directly to the ball. When you do that, where do you attach your rigged line...the ones with hooks? Is there a specific product for that purpose that attaches higher on the cable above the weight?

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I was reading on the wigglefin swarm thread about using them as a hookless attractor attached directly to the ball. When you do that, where do you attach your rigged line...the ones with hooks? Is there a specific product for that purpose that attaches higher on the cable above the weight?
    You got it. Scroll down on this page to see the #1176 Stacker. We tried the longer ones, but like the shorter 1176. Clip the stainless snap around your rigger wire (slides free for positioning), then grab the wire above it with the release on the shorter wire. Clip your fishing line to the second one.

  20. #20

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    Thanks for that, BrownBear...I'll pick one up. Probably just start inline and see how I get used to the whole thing. I also found a clip on Shakespeare line counter in my stack of stuff..no idea how durable they would be in salt water, but it might help me get "close" for mooching and avoid springing for a line counter reel.

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