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Thread: preferred way to patch dipnets?

  1. #1

    Default preferred way to patch dipnets?

    Does anyone have any tips or resources on the best way to patch holes in Kenai style dipnets? Ours are a few years old and I want to put a repair kit together to have on the river in case we have a blow out.

    Thanks,

    Armo

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Mending twine and a mending needle.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    At B&J you can buy a tool that can you put on several feet of string on for mending nets. That and a scissors or knife is all you need for tools. I use what ever type of string I have available and make what ever type of knot will work. I don't care all I'm interested in is getting it fixed to get back to fishing.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Learn how to mend gill net.

    http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xm...SGNO831989.pdf

    The quick fix for single broken strands in a dipnet bag is to just bring the knots on opposite sides of the broken strand together and use the remaining tails on the strands to tie the knots to each other. You would have to do this a hundred different times before your net would truly be unserviceable.

    Remember, we are using the dipnet as a baggy landing net. It does NOT have to be mended back to proper sized openings like you would do with a commercial gill net. We are not supposed to be gilling the fish we dip (and that just makes them all the harder to remove anyway).
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member AKSasquatch's Avatar
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    If you are out on the river, little zip ties are a quick fix, until you are done for the day and have time to fix it right


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Default Down and dirty emergency net repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Armo_Ak View Post
    Does anyone have any tips or resources on the best way to patch holes in Kenai style dipnets? Ours are a few years old and I want to put a repair kit together to have on the river in case we have a blow out.

    Thanks,

    Armo
    There is no substitute for doing a job right, but unfortunately I can barely tie my shoes and any knots more complicated soon seem to leave my memory banks. However, for an uncoordinated schlub like me that can't seem to follow even a simple knot tying diagram as well as having a serious problem with CRS, I have discovered something that works for me and it is quick as well as permanent. It is probably best to use the proper thread, but mason's line marlin line, or braided fishing like will work in a pinch. I tie whatever sort of knot I can and try to get the spacing somewhere close and then put a drop of superglue in it and it all bonds together and so far I have never had one fail. The superglue sets up in only a minute or so and I have had no problems other than occasionally getting my fingers sticky. What with the flow characteristics of the superglue and the braided material used in the net lines and whatever I am using for a quick repair, it all bonds together nicely and doesn't slip. I usually carry a used plastic pill container with some mending line, superglue, and a safety pin just incase the tube of glue develops a plug in the end. I check to make sure the glue is good each season and each trip.

    Good luck and Please Remember, Carry it in, Carry it out. Our Fish resources are appreciated by all, our PIGS are not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKSasquatch View Post
    If you are out on the river, little zip ties are a quick fix, until you are done for the day and have time to fix it right


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Ditto, always bring a handful of small zip ties, quickest way to get back in the action! Use the scissors/shears that's used to clip the tail to trim the excess so it doesn't tangle the net.

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the prompt responses fellas. Lots of good ideas here to put together a cheap little kit. Love the zip tie idea for quick fixes.

    Appreciate the help!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    A mending needle and mending twine is cheap and easy. Any commercial fishing supply store including the one in Kenai will have that stuff.
    probably cost you less than $15 and while your in the store they usually sell the webb cheaper than other places as they usually make the mesh bags up right there.
    The knots are easy. Probably easier than tying your shoes and no I'm not joking.
    If I start developing holes I replace the net as it is often gone bad at that point anyway. Unless I know it ripped from snagging it on something.
    When you store them store the net out of the sunlight as that will ruin them a lot quicker. If need be place the hoop and net portion in a black plastic trash bag for storage.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    When you store them store the net out of the sunlight as that will ruin them a lot quicker. If need be place the hoop and net portion in a black plastic trash bag for storage.
    ...or go camo...


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    You wouldn't happen to have a diagram of the knots used for this purpose and how to tie them would you? If so, I sure hope you know how to post it on here and will do so. I have tried to look it up on the Internet and had no luck, maybe I am not using the proper combination of words. I tried all sorts of things like, How to mend a fishing net, etc. The knots in the tide books and other fishing items that I have seen aren't what I need either. I have untied knots and tried to copy what I found, but regardless of what I do, they seem to slip, but one spot of that superglue and no slippage. Joining two ends together is no problem, but I sure can't seem to find anything on a right angle knot that won't slip. Obviously there is one, finding it, and learning how to tie it is my dilemma.

    Thanks in advance, and for your input.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    You wouldn't happen to have a diagram of the knots used for this purpose and how to tie them would you? If so, I sure hope you know how to post it on here...
    See post #4...

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...=1#post1407991
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Yes it is basically a couple of hatch hitches. Both links explain it pretty well.
    Thanks for the links guys.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Around, around, up through the middle...

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    Unfortunately for me, I am unable to open either link due to some glitch with Acrobat reader, but I am assuming that you mean to pinch off the part of the unbroken net thread into a loop where you want the right angle repair junction, then go around the outside of the loop twice with your repair thread and then through the loop and pull tight, and repeat on the far end of the repair. Is that it?

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by uhldwm View Post
    Unfortunately for me, I am unable to open either link due to some glitch with Acrobat reader, but I am assuming that you mean to pinch off the part of the unbroken net thread into a loop where you want the right angle repair junction, then go around the outside of the loop twice with your repair thread and then through the loop and pull tight, and repeat on the far end of the repair. Is that it?
    Depending on your web browser, you can add-on a PDF viewer so you don't have to use adobe reader.

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