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Thread: Time for BBQ Black Bear Ribs!!!!

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    Default Time for BBQ Black Bear Ribs!!!!

    I got my first bait station bear last month with the RugerSuper Redhawk 454 Casull-5, Linotype255gr SWC, doing 1600fps, from 3yds in a ground blind. (Ahr Ahr Ahr) That was exciding! Enough with the formalities. I want to BBQ theribs and cut off all the large flat pieces of meat off the ribs. Should I haveleft those on or would that have fallen off when cooked? Also in future referents,how do you process the ribs, starting with the whole rib cage? (Meaning the appropriate cuts)

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    I cut the meat off the ribs on all my game except moose and it goes in my jerky/sausage pile.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASUS-DAG View Post
    I got my first bait station bear last month with the RugerSuper Redhawk 454 Casull-5, Linotype255gr SWC, doing 1600fps, from 3yds in a ground blind. (Ahr Ahr Ahr) That was exciding! Enough with the formalities. I want to BBQ theribs and cut off all the large flat pieces of meat off the ribs. Should I haveleft those on or would that have fallen off when cooked? Also in future referents,how do you process the ribs, starting with the whole rib cage? (Meaning the appropriate cuts)
    What I usually do with any ribs is cut them in half or thirds.......whatever size you think you'd like, then boil them slowly for awhile to tenderize them. Slap some bbq sauce on them and onto the bar-b they go. After boiling them awhile, a bit of the fat will fall off....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    AAAAAAH Blasphemy boiling ribs lol. I like my bear ribs meaty I cut them in half then cut them in 4 rib pieces. I throw the ribs on the grill for a little bit and then put them in a pan, cover with tinfoil and bake at a low heat till the meat falls from the bone.
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

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    Quote Originally Posted by thunder chicken1 View Post
    AAAAAAH Blasphemy boiling ribs lol.
    Whatever flips your prop, or trips your trigger......lol. You notice I said "usually" and that was referring to moose mostly. But I have been known to cook sheep ribs over an open fire on the side of a mountain at times too. I'm sure that would work just as nicely on a young berry fed blackie as well.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I also prefer to boil my moose ribs first
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    I also prefer to boil my moose ribs first
    Yes, they can be pretty tuff is ya don't........especially a big old bull.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Not bear, but I pressure cook my deer ribs for 20-30 minutes, which is just long enough to dissolve the excess fat off them, and tender them up. Then I put on a rub or sauce, and finish them in the oven, broiling them until they're done. Works great!

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    Heres how you do ribs.
    Bake at 400 for 20 minutes
    Remove and cook in pressure cooker for 40 minutes
    Remove and put back in oven for 15 minutes with your bbq sauce or whatever on top.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sh View Post
    Heres how you do ribs.
    No.....that's how YOU do ribs....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I found an awesome way to make game ribs and lots of other things this year: sous vide. I put them in a vacuum sealed bag and submerge it for 48 hours in water heated to exactly 135 degree (F) using an immersion circulator (mine is an Anova, but there are other brands). Then I finish them very quickly on a hot charcoal grill. The long cook time makes them extremely tender, and they still come out medium rare!
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troutnut View Post
    I found an awesome way to make game ribs and lots of other things this year: sous vide. I put them in a vacuum sealed bag and submerge it for 48 hours in water heated to exactly 135 degree (F) using an immersion circulator (mine is an Anova, but there are other brands). Then I finish them very quickly on a hot charcoal grill. The long cook time makes them extremely tender, and they still come out medium rare!
    Now that sounds like a good idea. However I looked up those cookers and they seem pretty spendy...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Now that sounds like a good idea. However I looked up those cookers and they seem pretty spendy...???
    Meh...just use a crock pot. Lol.

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    You don't want med rare bear ribs...ever heard of trichinosis?

    Off another hunting site.... http://www.rokslide.com/forums/showt...ting-Bear-Meat!!!!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    You don't want med rare bear ribs...ever heard of trichinosis?
    I guess a guy needs to check temp when he feels it's med-rare. Personally I've always liked meat cooked med-rare as well. But when it comes to bear I've always gone for med. It would be interesting to see temps for both....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I guess a guy needs to check temp when he feels it's med-rare. Personally I've always liked meat cooked med-rare as well. But when it comes to bear I've always gone for med. It would be interesting to see temps for both....
    I cooked some this past winter and it was either medium or med rare. It was good. I ended up cooking the next batch a little warmer after gettig a meat thermometer. None if us got sick. I prefer my wild game to have a little pink in it. Tastes much better IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Now that sounds like a good idea. However I looked up those cookers and they seem pretty spendy...???
    They were really expensive (like $1000) until just the past year or so, when a few different companies (Anova, Sansaire, Nomiku) came out with models in the $200-300 range. You wouldn't want to spend that just for ribs, but since I got my Anova in February I've been using it almost every day for dinner... it's awesome for steak, salmon, and birds too.

    You don't want med rare bear ribs...ever heard of trichinosis?


    That's true for normal cooking methods, and people normally shouldn't take chances with medium rare bear, even if they luck out once or twice and don't get sick.

    However, the sous vide method makes it possible to safely eat bear medium rare IF you're careful and do your homework about cooking times. Killing bacteria and parasites is a matter of both time and temperature. With other cooking methods, you can only get things medium rare by cooking them for a fairly short time (which could even mean a few hours in the oven), and the interior doesn't get hot enough for a long enough time to kill the nasty stuff. But with sous vide you can maintain the same exact temperature throughout the whole cut of meat for hours or even days, and it'll still be medium rare at the end if the temperature was around 130-135.

    Here's a webpage with a table of minimum cook time / temperature combinations to kill Trichinella:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs153

    I've been eating bear sausage medium rare cooked overnight (8-12 hours) at 135. I haven't tried bear ribs this way yet, but I've been doing caribou ribs for 48 hours at 135 and they're delicious and tender and still pink inside. I would do bear the same way.

    Another important rule is that you shouldn't cook any meat sous vide at a temperature below 130 for more than 4 hours, because temperatures in the 120s can accelerate bacterial growth over long time periods. But temperatures in the 120s are great for short (~1-2 hour) cooks for cuts that are otherwise safe to eat rare, like caribou steak.
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

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    The question arises...how do you know what temp the meat is at? On something thin like ribs, you can assume over time it will reach that temp. On thicker cuts you are playing a dangerous game. The results of getting trichinosis are permanent. You have just become a permanent host to an ugly parasite. When the meat thermometer reads 165-180F in the middle of the thickest meat you are assured. How do you know how long that thicker cut of meat has been at 135F?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    The question arises...how do you know what temp the meat is at? On something thin like ribs, you can assume over time it will reach that temp. On thicker cuts you are playing a dangerous game. The results of getting trichinosis are permanent. You have just become a permanent host to an ugly parasite. When the meat thermometer reads 165-180F in the middle of the thickest meat you are assured. How do you know how long that thicker cut of meat has been at 135F?
    I would think because of the extremely long times he is talking about cooking at those temps. I mean, if you cook something at 135 for 48 hours I can't think of how a piece of meat couldn't be at that temp throughout...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    The question arises...how do you know what temp the meat is at? On something thin like ribs, you can assume over time it will reach that temp. On thicker cuts you are playing a dangerous game.


    Even thick roasts will eventually equalize to the same temperature as the water, which is precisely controlled to within 1 degree or so. It's really not a dangerous game if your cooking times are long enough.

    Here's a chart of the minimum time required to cook a steak sous vide for various thicknesses:

    http://sansaire.com/cook-steak-sous-vide/

    In a nutshell: 1 hour for 1 inch thickness, 3 hours for 2 inch thickness, 6 hours for 3 inch thickness. That's the time needed to reach the intended internal temperature, so add that plus the required time to kill Trichinella at the given temperature (from my previous post) to get the total minimum cook time.

    I'm cooking ribs and bear sausages for much longer than the minimum times because it helps tenderize them. That's the neat thing about sous vide -- you can cook the heck out of stuff without overcooking it.
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

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