Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Design ideas for freighter canoe.

  1. #1

    Default Design ideas for freighter canoe.

    I'm about to embark into the unknown. I've got some time on my hands & want to build a freighter canoe for cruising the SE Alaskan Pacific, the braided glacier rivers, & the large lakes of the Yukon. I want to power via a Copperhead motor.

    The way I understand these motors to work you want a canoe with wide hips & a big arse, since all the weight will be in the back of the canoe. I considered a remote steering station in the middle of the canoe, but that would go against the grain of being simple & lightweight.

    Considering doing it in stitch & glue or cedar strip. I've done both before. It is an interesting design, because I can see it being a planing vessel with little to no weight & a displacement vessel when she's chock-a-block full of camping gear, moose carcass, et al.

    So you gents that have experience in this regard; What should I be paying close attention to & what is no big deal. I'm thinking something with splash rails, easily removable front 1/3 skirt or =, quite a bit of freeboard, oar locks for emergencies, 19.5 feet give or take a foot, 4.25' max. width, some type of sacrificial bottom material that can be easily maintained, ... What is important & what is not? Give me some ideas? Want to use the lowest weight copperhead, but still be able to plow thru a headwind on a big lake or mild ocean.

    Thanks, John

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Valdez Alaska
    Posts
    41

    Default

    [QUOTE=Kushtekaa;1407575]I'm about to embark into the unknown. I've got some time on my hands & want to build a freighter canoe for cruising the SE Alaskan Pacific, the braided glacier rivers, & the large lakes of the Yukon. I want to power via a Copperhead motor.

    The way I understand these motors to work you want a canoe with wide hips & a big arse, since all the weight will be in the back of the canoe. I considered a remote steering station in the middle of the canoe, but that would go against the grain of being simple & lightweight.

    Considering doing it in stitch & glue or cedar strip. I've done both before. It is an interesting design, because I can see it being a planing vessel with little to no weight & a displacement vessel when she's chock-a-block full of camping gear, moose carcass, et al.

    So you gents that have experience in this regard; What should I be paying close attention to & what is no big deal. I'm thinking something with splash rails, easily removable front 1/3 skirt or =, quite a bit of freeboard, oar locks for emergencies, 19.5 feet give or take a foot, 4.25' max. width, some type of sacrificial bottom material that can be easily maintained, ... What is important & what is not? Give me some ideas? Want to use the lowest weight copperhead, but still be able to plow thru a headwind on a big lake or mild ocean.

    As a fellow boat builder i hope to see postings of your project: I use a Freighter with a kicker lift and have use it for years. I use Mercury motors due to the shift being on the trottle. Take my word, that this comes in handy. one of my tricks is to carry five gallon buckets with screw on lids..fill with water to place in Bow for counter weight. Remove after filling boat with fish or meat etc.
    I also helped build a 22 ft flat bottom river boat for this same type of trips..wish i had pictures, i'll try to find one. We put chines on this boat to give it lift and to allow easily laying the boat on its sides to load. It was wide and bottom tapered up on both ends..worked great...it carried huge heavy loads and slid through the shallowest streams and could be lined...

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    I don't see a copperhead as a good design for big water waves where you want your prop in the water at all times.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I don't see a copperhead as a good design for big water waves where you want your prop in the water at all times.
    Will, Thanks for your comment. I considered this, but was under the impression that the surface drive propeller depth could be changed on-the-fly by just raising the tiller handle & hence lowering the propeller? I guess what is the maximum range in depth that one can adjust the propeller? Another option would be to increase the backwards angle of the transom to gain more depth.

    In waves with a lower propeller that would tend to also lower the bow, which would require some reserve bouyancy in the bow. Seems like a raked or clipper bow would be in order.

  5. #5

    Default

    "We put chines on this boat to give it lift and to allow easily laying the boat on its sides to load."

    How do you gain lift with chines? Seems you would gain more lift with more of a flatter bottom, like on a Jon boat? I could see the chines making it easier to slide the boat & give it better manueverability at speed.

  6. #6

    Default Homebuilt freighter

    Interesting discussion on home building a freight canoe. Used a surface drive for a motor. I think he bought his plans. Might help with some ideas for your project:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...uild-in-Alaska


    Eric

  7. #7

    Default

    Boy, that guy is quite the craftsman with wood & copper. I really like how he did his copper painters. I may just have to steal that idea. I am not at this level of craftsmanship & if I did I would be affeared to use & abuse it.

    I'm kicking around the idea of using 1/8" thick cedar strip with a polyester cloth / epoxy bottom and an interior s-glass or =. I just can't figure out how to get complete bottom coverage with UHMW for those very shallow, gravel, glacial, river bottoms. Those will play hell with abrasion. It seems that the airboat community is either using rivets or bolts, but I have a problem with sticking holes in the bottom of boats. I would like to use 1/8" UHMW to keep weight down.

    Seems no one really has figured out how to make a solid bottom (meaning no other materials) with this stuff & sides out of composite. It would be too heavy to make a complete canoe out of it. Unfortunately, the properties that make it good for going over rocks & such also makes it difficult to marry with any other materials.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Look into Gator Glide. It's a 2 part roll-on coating. Check it out on youtube. It's on my list to put on my freighter and my flat bottom.

  9. #9

    Default

    There maybe hope yet. This video shows a vacuum bagging process whereby both the canoe and uhmw are epoxied. Would like to know what epoxy & UHWM they are using: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCYDs...Ye_yCdrIQaYtpw

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •