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Thread: Questions to those who use canoe electric motors

  1. #1
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    Default Questions to those who use canoe electric motors

    I plan to buy a canoe in the near future, a 16-foot Old Town 2-seated(Guide-160), and eventually will add an electric motor. The idea is to use the motor occasionally, but will paddle most of the time. However, I have no idea of how powerful canoe electric motors should be. The ones I have looked at at the Cabela's catalog may be too powerful, and intended for boat use. My questions are as follows:

    What are your opinions on electric motors for canoes?
    How powerful should they be?
    What motor would you recommend?

    I would appreciate any comments you may have on this subject.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Canoe and troller

    I have a 17 foot Osagian square stern aluminum canoe with a Minn Kota 12v 44lbs thrust waterfoul edition XL. I skipped the small and dinky batteries designed for the trolling motors and bought a Marine signature battery with 115 amp hour capacity, 6.5 hours of WOT run time, and 760 marine cranking amps. The battery weighs about 75lbs. Yes it may be overkill but my canoe has a load rating of half a ton. With this setup I can move my canoe very well and I havnt met a lake current that I struggle in. I have never run out of battery on a day fishing trip and I am confident I could take the fully charged battery on a camping trip if need be. Hey, if the battery dies thats what paddles are made for.

    I doubt you will need 44lbs of thrust. Considering the guide 160 is ligther than my Osagian and probably has less resistance in the water. I wonder how a troller mounted to the side edge would effect steering, if at all? It would be nice when you need to scoot acrost a lake but a 30 or 36lbs trolling motor should be fine for you. Something like the Endura 30 or Endura 36 would probably suite your needs. They are around $120 new too.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, Water_Gremlin for your reply.

    The Guide-160 weights 82 pounds (a little heavy), and has a capacity of 1,286 pounds. It's a little wide at almost 40" (yours probably is just as wide or wider), but this helps with the canoe's capacity. I agree with you about your battery choice, and that's what I have been thinking about. The heavier battery is not a hindrance, since it can be placed near the front of the canoe to make it more stable during solo rides.

    Thanks you for your comments on the electric motors, because even though I know plenty about batteries, I know nothing about canoe electric motors. Old Town sells a wooden rig that clamps on their canoes for the use of electric motors. I also noticed that Cabela's sells electric motors with a wrist electronic remote control. This gadget allows you to control the motor from a few feet of distance. The only problem is that the motor and remote are much more expensive than the one you have mentioned. More than likely I will end-up buying a sort of motor like the ones you have mentioned.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4

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    Personally, I would just find a way to extend the handle. lol If my trolling motor will push my boat pretty good you wont have a prolblem with a 44lbs thrust troller

    Ya, my canoe is about 44" wide and 15" deep

  5. #5

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    I have an Old Town 20 ft. "XL Tripper" rated at 2200 lbs carrying capacity. It's (I believe) 42 or 44" wide. It is rated by Old Town to take up to a 10 h.p. outboard motor. I use the aluminum/wood (clamp-on) bracket and mount a Minn Kota 12v. electric motor with 32 lbs of thrust, on the canoe. I use a h.d. marine / deep cycling battery (from Minn Kota) to power the canoe and I can get two (2) days of stop & start fishing before I need to recharge it. The only problem with this rig is that while I have the shortest shaft length motor that Minn Kota makes, I still have to reach up and behind me - to the motor's handle while steering the canoe and that gets akward after a while. It is a great rig which pushes the canoe along at about 5 to 8 mph. There are times that I wish I had a square ender with more hp (for speed) but those time are rare and I really like the ability to "sneek along" without making noise and not polluting the environment. I've had this rig for 8 years and based upon my experience I think you could easily put an electric motor on your canoe with 32 to 44 lbs of thrust, as the center of gravity is very low in the canoe. Hope this helps.

  6. #6
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    Yes, all of your replies help quite a lot, since I am learning things to consider when buying a motor. Wouldn't a handle extension help you? I see some of them at Cabela's.

    Thanks.

    Ray

  7. #7

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    With my Minn Kota the shaft is adjustable and can be raised or lowered. It really makes a difference when passing through shallow areas in a lake, and easier to reach. As far as the handle extension, I should considering buying one. I stand up a lot in my canoe and its tough to reach the handle when your 3 feet away fly fishing.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Water_Gremlin
    With my Minn Kota the shaft is adjustable and can be raised or lowered. It really makes a difference when passing through shallow areas in a lake, and easier to reach. As far as the handle extension, I should considering buying one. I stand up a lot in my canoe and its tough to reach the handle when your 3 feet away fly fishing.
    Just got a response from Minn Kota about motors for canoes such as the Guide-160 and others, and they do have two motors that are not too powerful, both with shafts of 30". The Classic 28 (28 Lbs of trust), and the Endura 30. Both are very well priced at $114.00 for the Endura, and a little less for the Classic. I will probably buy the Endura because of the 2 extra pounds of trust over the Classic.

    Thanks again for your responses, and also to MEtracker.

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