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Thread: bear worms

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    Default bear worms

    On the brown bear that I shot there were some white worms 4-5 inches long around the neck and spine area. Looks like the roundworm for moose in the ak hunting reg books. Does anyone know what these are? I tried to search for it here. I might be able to upload a picture

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    cant see any pictures if you attached them, but do they look like spaghetti noodles (only thinner)? I found these on a moose, and they were ID as Leg Worm (black fly transmission), usually found around joints of the legs and sometimes the neck. Might ask ADFG. Not sure if bears get the same worm species as ungulates.

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    Default does this pic work

    b worm.jpgb worm.jpgthey do look identical to the legworm moose pic in the regs. I guess they'll just make for extra protein

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    Trichinosis, from what i can find, is a tiny worm, from 1.5 to 3mm in length. Those look too big to be trich. I found some nasties in black bears in the Alaska Range this year; 7 and 9 inches long, about as big around as a nightcrawler. they crawled out of wounds in the brisket and rear leg. I believe they were round legworm, as described in the game regulations.

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    Trichinosis is caused by the species of nematode called Trichenella spirals. I doubt they would crawl out of the wounds like you are describing. Trichenella worms typically live in the muscle tissues of bears and other vertebrate hosts including humans. That's what causes trichinosis. I believe the worm you are describing sounds like some type of intestinal worm or possibly a worm that infects the lymphatic/circulatory system. Possibly Ascarid worms or Filarial worms. Nematodes are not something to mess around with. I shot a black bear in the Alaska Range once and I has a similar experience to what you are describing. I have some old pictures that were taken with an older camera. I'll try to see if I can scan them and attach it to this thread a little later tonight AFTER DINNER. I don't really want to look at them right now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Trichinosis, from what i can find, is a tiny worm, from 1.5 to 3mm in length. Those look too big to be trich. I found some nasties in black bears in the Alaska Range this year; 7 and 9 inches long, about as big around as a nightcrawler. they crawled out of wounds in the brisket and rear leg. I believe they were round legworm, as described in the game regulations.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Trichinosis is caused by the species of nematode called Trichenella spirals. I doubt they would crawl out of the wounds like you are describing. Trichenella worms typically live in the muscle tissues of bears and other vertebrate hosts including humans. That's what causes trichinosis. I believe the worm you are describing sounds like some type of intestinal worm or possibly a worm that infects the lymphatic/circulatory system. Possibly Ascarid worms or Filarial worms. Nematodes are not something to mess around with. I shot a black bear in the Alaska Range once and I has a similar experience to what you are describing. I have some old pictures that were taken with an older camera. I'll try to see if I can scan them and attach it to this thread a little later tonight AFTER DINNER. I don't really want to look at them right now.
    Okay. I scanned the old photos. Here they are. This was from a black bear that I shot in the Alaska Range about 16 years ago. It was filled with these worms in the photo. They were crawling out the bullet holes.


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    Nice pics. disgusting,
    they look the same like leg worm. I only found a couple near the neck and spine. If there was a ton I wouldn't have tried it but I haven't started dragging my butt on the carpet so I guess I'm ok

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    The last brown bear I shot was full of tapeworms. This was a big writhing ball of segmented worms that came rolling out when I nicked the gut on accident. Thanks, but I'll pass on the brown bear steaks.

  11. #11

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    Saw the same worms in the brownie I shot on the Kenai this spring. They were crawling out while we were skinning him. Pretty gross. But I ate some of the meat (very well cooked) and I never felt any ill effects.

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    In all honesty I've ate a ton of it cooked above 160 f absolutely delicious. If I would have seen a pile of them I don't know if I could have though

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    The last brown bear I shot was full of tapeworms. This was a big writhing ball of segmented worms that came rolling out when I nicked the gut on accident. Thanks, but I'll pass on the brown bear steaks.
    I've pulled tapeworms out of Dall sheep and snowshoe hares and ate them with no worries. Tapeworms are relatively benign compared to roundworms (nematodes). Tapeworms rarely do anything beyond stealing a few nutrients from the host. On a very rare occasion, the juvenile tapeworms called bladder worms will encyst in the brain of a host and then it can be very symptomatic even fatal. Most nematodes on the other hand have very severe symptoms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Okay. I scanned the old photos. Here they are. This was from a black bear that I shot in the Alaska Range about 16 years ago. It was filled with these worms in the photo. They were crawling out the bullet holes.

    I shot one like that up in Talkeetna many years ago and when I took it to Fish and Game, they advised me to discard it. The guy actually told me that as bad as the worms were, he figure the bear would have been dead in a matter of weeks. I used to hunt peninsula caribou and blow flies freaked me out the first couple times I found them under the skin, but the worms were the strangest thing I had ever seen.

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    IMAG0023.JPGIMAG0024.JPGHere's a couple from a grizzly. The worms were throughout the stomach and intestines

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    Good god!!! I hope I don't ever cut a bear open and see this! I'm glad my spring bear was decent for a old bear to! The wife and I are hoping to double up this up coming spring! Bear is bomb ass meat!!!

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