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Thread: Don't Laugh... I'm serious!

  1. #1
    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Default Don't Laugh... I'm serious!

    I've read the comment several times, "wear gloves when skinning that bear to save your life", etc.

    I just read a post that showed a guy wearing nitrile gloves, presumably for skinning the bear.

    Is there a problem with bears and skin contact?

    Thoughts?

    Thanks,

    KRS

  2. #2
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default If you have any open cuts or such

    on your hands or fingers, the bears blood can enter and if the bear has tricanosis, however it is spelled, it can be passed on. Just a safety precaution. We wear them while gutting and skinning. My dad wore them while butchering and I did not this time. So far I am fine, atleast I think I am . It is cureable and I think people don't know that. I am pretty sure you just get or shot or take some meds for a bit. But I know it is cureable. That is also why you are supposed to cook black bear well done. Which is why we get summer sausage made and burger. I can eat a well done burger but not a steak, steak has to be bloody or at the least a good dark pink.

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    Default old forum thread

    Check out the below link. This is a thread from the old forum format.

    Based on your question it is a must read...

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...ting/72376.htm

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    Default gotta eat trich

    Trichinella cysts, which cause trichinosis, must be ingested in order for the stomach acid to dissolve the cyst's case and release the worm. The worms then enter the small intestine and mate. They then lay eggs which become immature worms. The immature worms travel through arteries and lodge in muscle, where they encyst again. They are usually not deadly, but can be painful, give you the runs, etc, and they can be deadly if they get into a heart or are just too many. They can also enter the central nervous system and really screw you up. Gloves won't help much w/ trich, but there MAY be other blood-born kooties in bears that could infect us. Not sure on that one, but I did read of an individual (on this forum?) who got something from a black bear that **** near killed him. I never verified the story, but I wear gloves. If nothing else, you don't go into your tent w/ blood/fat on your hands that won't wash off too well.

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    Default

    I'm assuming you saw the picture in my post - both me and my buddy work in the medical field so we have an oversupply of gloves - We also ahve been trained that any blood contact is bad.

    main reason why I wear them when dealing with any dead animal is that its just easier to clean up and stay clean....Thats all..

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Last year

    Last year I helped process/skin 4-5 black bears. Less than a week latter my right thumb started to swell up and turn black. I saw a doc in Wasilla, as I was taking a class there, and he was a little light on the meds. By the time I got back to Valdez, the thumb was 2x's normal, the black was moving about 3/8" a day down the rest of the thumb to the wrist. A visiting Air Force doctor put me on 1,200 units of something penecilin, twice a day by IV. I had to report every 12 hours for five days.

    Now I wear gloves and was any cuts out immediately with hydrogen peroxide or carry a sanatizing soap.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

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    Default

    I always wear latex or Nitrile gloves when skinning moose and any other animal. If you search "bear hands" or "seal hands" on the Internet, you will come upon some examples of infections caught on seal and bear hunter's hands. It's not a rare occurrence in Alaska, and mostly happens when blood and bacteria enter one's skin through small cuts in one's hands. Some cuts are microscopic in size, and one may not be aware of them.

    Since latex gloves are very slippery when blood-soaked, so I wear a set of Neoprene fishing gloves over the latex ones. These gloves have a non-skid finish on the palms and fingers, so it doesn't matter if they get soaked with blood and guts. If you only wear latex or nitrile gloves, about ten to fifteen minutes later they start breaking up. Not so if you also wear a set of neoprene gloves over the latex ones.

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    I've never had a problem with good nitrile gloves - Also - As a suggestion - Steer away from Latex - Over time you can devlop an allergy to it...

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by OneLunG View Post
    I've never had a problem with good nitrile gloves - Also - As a suggestion - Steer away from Latex - Over time you can devlop an allergy to it...
    I've never used gloves when butchering moose, but for predators and bears I carry latex gloves and without a doubt I snap them puppies on whenever I come in contact with their parasite riddened body juices. As far as developing an allergy to latex, well, lil Water_Gremlin hasn't had any problems to date.

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    Yeah developing allergies most often occurs when you use them A LOT...but some people will just develop them over time...

    Nitrile also will not fall apart on ya as easily......and there is a HUGE difference between cheap Nitrile...and good nitrile...

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    I used to trap and I have skinned countless animals from marten to wolves and any number of bears that I or my friends have shot. I never did put on a pair of gloves for any of them. It sounds like I was extremely lucky and that skinning these animals is something like Russian Roulette.

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Default

    I wear them when skinning canine fur critters and DLP killed bears, but never have when dressing out moose or caribou.

    I guess my thoughts are why glove up if I'm going to eat it anyway.
    Now what ?

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    Default Goats

    I've heard that mountain goats carry some sort of virus or bacteria as well. Is that true?

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    Default

    Have used them( latex gloves) the last few years and they sure keep your hands clean. No more "sticky" hands.
    As CWD is around i`d rather be safe than sorry. Besides i get the gloves free at my Doctors office.

  15. #15
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by Water_Gremlin View Post
    I've never used gloves when butchering moose, but for predators and bears I carry latex gloves and without a doubt I snap them puppies on whenever I come in contact with their parasite riddened body juices....
    I prefer to wear latex gloves when field dressing any animal, but in the past, I often forgot to bring them. Now I carrry a complete "kit", with knives, sharpener, gloves, cord, and meat bags in a waterproof sack secured to a pack frame. I haul it around whenever I go anywhere, even if it mostly stays in the vehicle/camp.

  16. #16

    Default

    [quote=stevelyn;110346]I wear them when skinning canine fur critters and DLP killed bears, but never have when dressing out moose or caribou.

    Why only DLP killed bears?

    To me it only makes sense to have gloves on. I never even thought of wearing them when I started hunting almost 20 years ago, but its so much easier to clean up when you have gloves on. Its a bonus that they protect me from crap a critter may have.

    Would you help a bleeding person on the side of the road without gloves if you had the choice of wearing them or not wearing them?

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm also for using gloves when skinning. Also not a bad idea to have a dilluted bleach sollution to go wash up with when you are done. The gloves aren't that tough.

    As far as latex allergies, I've heard that it can be an allergy to the latex, or to the powder they use in them. Before moving up here I worked in clean rooms in the computer industry. After about a year of wearing gloves during 12 hour shifts, I developed a rash on my hands. No cremes helped at all. Even after moving up here it took several years for the rash to go away.

    For the past few years I've been building a boat and use latex gloves whenever applying epoxy or painting. I've gone through probably 500 pairs, but typically don't wear them for hours on end, and only a few days a week. The skin reaction has yet to return.

    I don't think occasional use will cause problems, but understand those in fields that use them daily can have problems.

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    I've known about the possibility of a bad infection from skinning black bear since the 50s when my grandfather got infected thru a cut. The strangest cases I've seen and heard about though concern contact with a Polar Bear liver. Supposedly they contain the highest concentration of Vitamin A of anything in nature. (from eating seals) In the 70's I know it was big Taboo to eat PB liver or to even touch one with cuts on your hand. I'm sure the Taboo about eating PB liver was passed down for many generations having myself been told by an old woman in her nineties who was born in the 1800s near Barrow. There were at least 2 hunters in the village in the 70s who through contact with PB liver had their hair turn white within a matter of days after contact. One just a shock of hair turned white and the other all his head hair. I'm not sure if they ingested a sliver of PB liver or it entered thru a cut. Long time ago, I saw their hair and heard the stories but like anything else I don't know for sure what is fact and fiction.

  19. #19

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    I wear gloves for everything I skin anymore. Bears are the ones that worry me the most but its a lot easier to just wrip off the gloves when your done gutting, skinning or fleshing anything and having fairly clean hands. The years of dried blood in my nails and the concerns for bacteria have brought me to this. I am also a fireman so rubber gloves are pretty easy to come by<grin> and most fire departments avoid using anything latex (aside from a few IV components) because of concern for patients having allergic reactions to them so mine are latex free. They dont weigh anything and are just good insurance both to disease and bacteria and also for our hygene.

  20. #20
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean77 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn View Post
    I wear them when skinning canine fur critters and DLP killed bears, but never have when dressing out moose or caribou.
    Why only DLP killed bears?
    To avoid leaving fingerprints.

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