Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Kodiak hunt gear questions

  1. #1
    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    323

    Default Kodiak hunt gear questions

    As this will be my first bush plane dropoff hunt (I am normally used to walk-ins where weight is paramount) I have a few questions regarding gear that we will be bringing out. I have a flight with Andrews Air (#1200 capacity) that will be transporting 3 people (me at roughly 225# and the other 2 at about 175# each). Only 2 of us will be hunting the other person is going as a mule if you will. I figured each hunter's pack will be about 50#. We have an Arctic Oven 10 Extreme reserved which weighs in at about 42# without any type of stove. Our plan was to buy our food in town the day prior to flying out eliminating the need to check a bunch of bags from Fairbanks. Any recommendation as to what type of container we should pack the food in to load up on the plane. Tough boxes? Cooler? Again we would rather buy this stuff in Kodiak prior being flown out so we would be at the mercy of whatever the local retailers have in stock. Also, what would you all recommend in regards to getting rid of food package waste in the field. I have read that building fires is not the best option due to spooking the bears. The only other thing I can think of is storing trash in the container that we would bring out. Not sure about that either. Suggestions? As far as the other gear I have compiled a list that is still a work in progress. Any rec's on mailing the hides back to Fairbanks would also be greatly appreciated. I was thinking mailing a frozen hide in a plastic tote. Thanks for any advice you all may have.

    Shawn

  2. #2
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,527

    Default

    I pretty much take all my gear down to either NAC or Ace cargo and ship it down about a week or so before I go. Typically the only thing I bring down with me on the plane is a cooler of food, and weapon, sometimes my pack (minus fuel) also. I'll usually bring a bag back with me on the plane, but ship everything else back home the same way it got down there. Shipping is pretty reasonable (Just want to make sure you declare all HazMat and pay the additional $25), then the back haul is something like 25 cents/lb.

  3. #3

    Default

    I would definitely take along some folding chairs. Makes life so much more civilized not to have to always sit on the ground

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default

    For shipping gear, I've used fish boxes many times. Pack a couple duffle bags (to hold the gear on the return trip) then use the boxes to ship the meat/hides. Plastic totes are good, too. Drill some holes thru the lids & zip tie the lids to the boxes. We usually shop in Kodiak for stove fuel & incidentals, but I'd send everything else. Kodiak is a small town & depending on your timing, you could find some of the things you want to pick up in short supply. Hate to get there & find out there had been a run on TP, the day before. Maximize your 3 checked bags (w/AK Air) and you should be good to go.

  5. #5
    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Good point Gary! I will def bring what I can via checked luggage. I figured I might ship a couple things down there prior as well. I believe my charter will hang on to them for me until I get there?

  6. #6
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,527

    Default

    They'll hold on to your stuff, no problem. They have connex's right there at the office/dock where they store personal gear.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper 27 View Post
    Good point Gary! I will def bring what I can via checked luggage. I figured I might ship a couple things down there prior as well. I believe my charter will hang on to them for me until I get there?

    Yes they will. Andrews is a great air taxi; I've always been very pleased with their service.

  8. #8

    Default

    On a side note.... I will be going to Kodiak for a goat/deer hunt and I am wondering about boots. the good the bad about kenetrek and some of the other boots that are out there. thank you in advance.

  9. #9
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I would invest in a small hand held travel scale, I keep one with me at all times. Saved me money and time more times than I can count. Sucks repacking bags at the ticket counter to get under 50lbs.

    Weight everything,, it will be more than you think.

    I use cheap plastic totes for Kodiak trips, drill the top so you can use zip ties to keep the top on. I like to pack a couple Army Kit bags in the totes, this way I can use the duffles to pack gear in for the return and pack hides and meat in the totes. Make sure to get the ones that meet the max size limit, these can be packed with up to 99 lbs and flown with you on Alaska as excess baggage for 50 bucks, keeps hides with you.

    The Best Western has a freezer and they will let you store totes in there, They all get funny with leaky bags and totes prevent this. The totes work well in the field to store meat, can be weighted down with rocks and placed in cold water to act as a cooler and to keep scent down.

    I like to eat freeze dried food to keep scent down until after the bear hunting is over, we rinse all food packaging and keep it in a compactor bag until we have a large fire before we fly out and then take anything that did not burn.

    A few dura logs or a bag of charcoal are nice (consumables) to have along to cook or help get wet wood to burn.

    When I go to Kodiak I buy one way tickets,, I have had to pay to change my ticket because of weather so many times that I just book my return ASAP when we get back to town. If you do miss your Alaska fight, Andrews used to give a weather letter, if you take it to the counter to rebook, I was told they will waive the rebook fee.

    Food sure cost more on the island,, we always flight as much as we can to save money and buy the heavy stuff and fuel or booze there.

    Get a big one.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  10. #10

    Default

    +1 on the small hand scale. I bought one for $20 on Amazon and always travel with it.....has saved me a PIA several times.

  11. #11
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Might want to consider some kind of waterproof bags. Keep gear as dry as you can. Kodak weather is brutal at times and can surprise you. Cold camping it is the only way IMO. Anything to increase the odds helps. Of course after he is down a nice fire with some back straps is in order..

    Good gear is a must. Love the tote and zip tie idea. I use pelican cases. They weigh a little more but are durable, waterproof and solid.
    Have fun and good luck. Can't wait to return next spring to chase those browns..
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  12. #12
    Member Jeff Shannon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
    On a side note.... I will be going to Kodiak for a goat/deer hunt and I am wondering about boots. the good the bad about kenetrek and some of the other boots that are out there. thank you in advance.
    I've worn their Hardscrabble boots on a couple of Kodiak goat hunts and they've worked flawlessly. Definitely my favorite mountain boots.

  13. #13
    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Great points by all. I am going to be pallatizing a load out of Fairbanks to send early to prevent me from having to travel so heavy. That should help me limit to what I need to buy in Kodiak. The pallat will consist of our Arctic Oven tent, propane stove, totes, cooler, most of our food, etc. I was thinking of buying some fresh food in Kodiak for the trip. Don't want 3 mountain houses a day for 2 weeks. Any suggestions as to where to stay the night before and after the hunt? Restaurants? Local craft beers? Would love also to hit up a charter for some fishing if that's possible before heading back to Fairbanks. This thread is not helping keep my excitement down! CANNOT. WAIT. Thanks fellas...

    Shawn

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Action packers work great for storing gear and such. Andrews Air is top notch! Great folks and they run a clean tight ship!

  15. #15
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,837

    Default

    Steve's post was dead on. the cheap plastic totes are the ticket and they don't weigh much. Stack them for the trip in if you need.

    6 point crampons come in handy on the steep grassy slopes on occasion.

    I used a set of Lowas and they worked good for me. taking them to the brooks range this year.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper 27 View Post
    As this will be my first bush plane dropoff hunt (I am normally used to walk-ins where weight is paramount) I have a few questions regarding gear that we will be bringing out. I have a flight with Andrews Air (#1200 capacity) that will be transporting 3 people (me at roughly 225# and the other 2 at about 175# each). Only 2 of us will be hunting the other person is going as a mule if you will. I figured each hunter's pack will be about 50#. We have an Arctic Oven 10 Extreme reserved which weighs in at about 42# without any type of stove. Our plan was to buy our food in town the day prior to flying out eliminating the need to check a bunch of bags from Fairbanks. Any recommendation as to what type of container we should pack the food in to load up on the plane. Tough boxes? Cooler? Again we would rather buy this stuff in Kodiak prior being flown out so we would be at the mercy of whatever the local retailers have in stock. Also, what would you all recommend in regards to getting rid of food package waste in the field. I have read that building fires is not the best option due to spooking the bears. The only other thing I can think of is storing trash in the container that we would bring out. Not sure about that either. Suggestions? As far as the other gear I have compiled a list that is still a work in progress. Any rec's on mailing the hides back to Fairbanks would also be greatly appreciated. I was thinking mailing a frozen hide in a plastic tote. Thanks for any advice you all may have.

    Shawn
    Every year (about three times a year) I ship most my groceries to our home in the bush. We use the 18 gallon rubber made totes. We ship everything priority mail. Costs about $.50 a lb. not that bad. The flat rate boxes work great if shipping at least 20lbs. I just mailed most of my hunting out out and it cost me $80. That was everything (tent, axe, saws, etc) but my ammo and fuel canisters.

    off topic: which Sapper course did you to through?

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Steve's post was dead on. the cheap plastic totes are the ticket and they don't weigh much. Stack them for the trip in if you need.

    6 point crampons come in handy on the steep grassy slopes on occasion.

    I used a set of Lowas and they worked good for me. taking them to the brooks range this year.
    When I make my town trip I'll stack 7 rubbermaids together and duct tape them. I believe they weigh about 5 lbs a piece. The plastic ones have a tendency to bust. Especially in winter.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
    On a side note.... I will be going to Kodiak for a goat/deer hunt and I am wondering about boots. the good the bad about kenetrek and some of the other boots that are out there. thank you in advance.
    Up to this point Kenetrek is the only boot I've used but, there are several other great mountain boots out there. Consider taking a pair of ice crampons. The chain ones that slip over your boot if you plan on chasing goats up slippery grassy slopes.

  19. #19
    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Yukon I went through the May 2004 class at Leonard Wood. Remember like it was yesterday!

  20. #20
    Member joebut1985's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    407

    Default

    was there last year and have to say that having a set of crampons is priceless, especially when the weather picks up and starts raining and your on the side of a mountain somewhere. I have been running a pair of lowa boots but have started to like plastics a lot better. As everyone else has stated try to ship whatever you can before you leave, it helps out a lot. Also on the way back the shipping company has coolers/freezers to put your meat in till you pick it up.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •