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Thread: 49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

  1. #1

    Default 49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

    Probably could have shortened it down and I would have looked better in the process. But since the fish is safely in the freezer, I'll post the circus. Not sure if the A1 buoy was pulled under or if it was caught in my pedal drives (which could have been a disaster) I need to get a better system down. I suppose we should learn from our mistakes.

    A personal best halibut from a kayak for me. Even from a powerboat I have only managed 75 lbs which is the next goal from a kayak. Taped out at 49.5" which several of the weight/length charts I saw, put it at 57 plus pounds.

    Steep learning curve. This halibut fishing is pretty new for me. I'm lucky to have gotten this one I think.


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    Inspiring stuff. Nice catch!

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Use a very small rubber band to hold the harpoon tip on the shaft. You will have to experiment with the size/diameter. just make sure it is very lite and does not need a second wrap. It should come off with the point or break off as it goes through the fish.
    Then lay out all the line be hind you. I would use twisted polypropylene to reduce the knots and it floats. It will feed off the deck better.
    Is there a hole to set the handle of the harpoon in so it points up but is out of the way? That way you can just reach over and grab then stick.
    Also don't pull the butt's head out of the water till you are ready. It makes them all kinds of upset.

    I am really wanting a sit on top.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    My connection is too slow to screen the vid, but reading between the lines...if I were working from a sit on top, I'd prefer (let me count the ways) a flying gaff over a harpoon.
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    Hey Kardinal, I am really interested in getting into this, where can I find info on the set up you guys use? Im curious about whats going on with the buoy, is it just attached to the harpoon head so you can drag your catch to the beach? Also, what kind of price do these sit-on-top kayaks run?

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    Well done!......I like harpoons myself, perhaps just a wood one and cut it shorter so you don't have so much to deal with.

    Either way, nice work, I got a 60 lber in my power boat solo on Saturday and thought it was a challenge.....humbled.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Burntfrog View Post
    Hey Kardinal, I am really interested in getting into this, where can I find info on the set up you guys use? Im curious about whats going on with the buoy, is it just attached to the harpoon head so you can drag your catch to the beach? Also, what kind of price do these sit-on-top kayaks run?
    Thanks for all of the advice everyone. I'd recommend taking a quick peek at a website I'm working on. Alaskakayakfisher.com

    The buoy is just attached to the harpoon head. Too scary to tie it off like on a powerboat.

    Paddle kayaks start around $600. My pedal kayak is $2,000. You'll want a drysuit. Another $500. But think of all the launch fees and gas money you will save!!

    PM me if you want more detailed info! Or better yet stop by this weekend!


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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    http://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=399813

    Here is a good link to another method for attaching the harpoon dart to the shaft to keep it from slipping off.

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    I tie a small bungee very tightly on the handle just above the shaft. I put the harpoon point on the tip of the spear and run a loop on the cable/ line up thru the bungee. I also use a small clip like one on a dog leash to afix my harpoon line to the cable of the spear. 5 feet up the harpoon line I tie in a bouhy. another 10 feet up the harpoon line I tie off to a double wrap of bungee and then tie the bungee to a solid point on my boat. Get them up, harpoon thru soft belly...they run and meet lots of resistance which tires them quickly. As soon as I can haul them back up they either buy a .38 to the head or a cut gill/s with a big long bladed knife... has worked for 30 plus years from kayaks to zodiacs to hewescrafts...fresh hali sounds really good about now.

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    Member Anythingalaska's Avatar
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    Awesome video! I am impressed with your Kayak set up, looks like a sweet rig. When you harpooned the halibut, did your fishing line pull/snap? Also, I understand your system right now is working fine; but ever consider bringing a .22 pistol in place of the harpoon? Seems like it would make for a very fast/easy dispatch on larger halibut from a small boat like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anythingalaska View Post
    Awesome video! I am impressed with your Kayak set up, looks like a sweet rig. When you harpooned the halibut, did your fishing line pull/snap? Also, I understand your system right now is working fine; but ever consider bringing a .22 pistol in place of the harpoon? Seems like it would make for a very fast/easy dispatch on larger halibut from a small boat like that.
    Thanks! I have no idea how I snapped my 200lbs mono leader. So I need to re-evaluate that. I would also disagree that my system is "fine". lol. I am still trying to figure it out. So ANY input is greatly appreciated!!

    On my most recent video, I harpooned a halibut and the tip just bounced off. I must have hit the spine or head perfectly because after that, the halibut never moved. This supports your idea that a .22 would be a potential tool. My major hesitation is that I am not sure a firearm, me, and an oversized piece of tupperware is a good mix. I have bonked myself in the leg trying to dispatch a halibut. I could only imagine had it been a gun. lol. Ok I'd be more careful but still.

    I'm also looking to target salmon sharks at sometime and a more efficient means of dispatch might be necessary. I agree that a .22 could be a great tool for most people. But given my disorganization, saltwater, and just fear of stupid thing I do to myself....I think I may stay away from firearms for now....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    Probably could have shortened it down and I would have looked better in the process. But since the fish is safely in the freezer, I'll post the circus. Not sure if the A1 buoy was pulled under or if it was caught in my pedal drives (which could have been a disaster) I need to get a better system down. I suppose we should learn from our mistakes.

    A personal best halibut from a kayak for me. Even from a powerboat I have only managed 75 lbs which is the next goal from a kayak. Taped out at 49.5" which several of the weight/length charts I saw, put it at 57 plus pounds.

    Steep learning curve. This halibut fishing is pretty new for me. I'm lucky to have gotten this one I think.
    Boy the looks like a lotta work. My hat's off to ya for sure.

    Yeah, the 22 in the kayak may be a little on the "scary" side. Besides, if you don't hit them in the right place with that little slug, you could unload a whole cylinder into them and still not kill em.......lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13

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    Rudy -
    Would you be willing to share some of your advice on jigging halibut. I have only fished in Resurrection Bay (salt) out of a kayak over the last few years. I've kept it pretty simple with just bumping a jig on or close to the bottom up and down slopes to 60' - 80' of water. This has become my best technique for getting results. Halibut to 32", rockfish and some flounder.
    I've also trolled a little along the beach while en route with some success. Just using spinners and spoons.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    I'm also looking to target salmon sharks at sometime and a more efficient means of dispatch might be necessary. I agree that a .22 could be a great tool for most people. But given my disorganization, saltwater, and just fear of stupid thing I do to myself....I think I may stay away from firearms for now....
    I can't believe you said that! You are the one-man-band of ocean fishing. I've never seen anyone as organized as you!

  15. #15

    Default 49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

    Quote Originally Posted by fishnhunt View Post
    Rudy -
    Would you be willing to share some of your advice on jigging halibut. I have only fished in Resurrection Bay (salt) out of a kayak over the last few years. I've kept it pretty simple with just bumping a jig on or close to the bottom up and down slopes to 60' - 80' of water. This has become my best technique for getting results. Halibut to 32", rockfish and some flounder.
    I've also trolled a little along the beach while en route with some success. Just using spinners and spoons.
    First of all, Sayak, you only see the beauty of video editing. Haha. I'm a total slob. But I love the kayak fishing for making me be more organized. Ever invite someone fishing and that guy shows up with 10 rods and three tackle boxes? I WAS that guy. lol. But it was all in shopping bags stuffed into a duffel bag. Haha.

    As far as sharing my technique, I'm embarassed to say I am no expert. I also think cook inlet is very different than Seward. But let me share some observations.

    First you likely aren't going to Anchor. So that rules the number one technique available out that the powerboats use. So?

    I figure the main purpose of anchoring is to create a scent field. So as I drift, I almost act like a Nascar pit crew on a bait change. Stop my drift. Hold position best I can. Have bait ready. Up and down as fast as possible.

    I use bait almost exclusively. It just works better for me...and I'm lazy since I fish so many hours.

    Another disadvantage to a kayak is speed. I try to use that to my advantage. I catch most of my fish on a slow troll...not drift. Think about how a scent field would disperse drifting vs cutting across the current.

    The other observation I have is pounding the bottom is definitely an attractor. I use 12 to 24oz weight on a spreader bar. 50lbs spectra. That allows me slow troll while making contact with the bottom. Even while drifting. I will always aggressively pound the bottom before putting it a few ft above bottom to rest.

    I use a large hoochie to make sure I'm always fishing. Also, I do NOT like circle hooks from kayaks. Hook up ratio falls and I've had at least three fish cone all the way to the surface, open their mouth, and hooks come out. I just don't think you can consistently apply enough pressure off a kayak to properly set a circle hook. I run gamakatsu big river 12/0 hooks.

    Finally, be prepared to hook the 200 pounder. Last year I couldn't get a halibut into my net. Major bummer. Vowed not to let that happen again so I set up with a harpoon, shark hook, and boca grips. It's probably not going to happen, but it makes the 50 pounders easier.

    So I'm sure there's lots better specific advice from more seasoned halibut veterans but those are my observations from a kayak.




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  16. #16

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    More specific notes for me from a Seward. I've caught them right off millers landing out past Tonsina cr in about 200 ft of water. Shallower by a Tonsina. I don't do it because I hook way too many PCod. But if I were going to. I'd use salmon heads or something that might keep the Pcod off.


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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Kardinal 84...... If you ever get in the mood to just relax while out there fishing and have a good chance at catching at least a hundred pounder, put on a big king head and pull it up off the bottom around 10 feet. Of course you won't get the consistent action you would while using herring, (like I said, if you want to relax.) You may see smaller butts try and hit it but aren't big enough to take the whole thing......big butts are, and will...!!!

    Be prepared tho.....I'd hate to see one roll you over out there...!!!.......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    "More specific notes for me from a Seward. I've caught them right off millers landing out past Tonsina cr in about 200 ft of water. Shallower by a Tonsina. I don't do it because I hook way too many PCod. But if I were going to. I'd use salmon heads or something that might keep the Pcod off."

    That's the area I usually target, but not as deep. Not sure if I'm ready for the 200 pounder yet. I started out just stabbing in the dark with bait, but jigging really cut down on the trash. Do you try and use the tide? I don't anchor and I find drifting is pretty effective. When you say "troll", you mean dragging bumping your bait along the bottom at a steady pace? To cover more water? The net can be difficult and I'm going to try the harpoon and lip grip next time. How many halibut do you average on a typical day fishing that area? And do you troll for silvers along the beaches?


  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnhunt View Post
    "More specific notes for me from a Seward. I've caught them right off millers landing out past Tonsina cr in about 200 ft of water. Shallower by a Tonsina. I don't do it because I hook way too many PCod. But if I were going to. I'd use salmon heads or something that might keep the Pcod off."

    That's the area I usually target, but not as deep. Not sure if I'm ready for the 200 pounder yet. I started out just stabbing in the dark with bait, but jigging really cut down on the trash. Do you try and use the tide? I don't anchor and I find drifting is pretty effective. When you say "troll", you mean dragging bumping your bait along the bottom at a steady pace? To cover more water? The net can be difficult and I'm going to try the harpoon and lip grip next time. How many halibut do you average on a typical day fishing that area? And do you troll for silvers along the beaches?

    In Cook Inlet, you have to know the tides since it can flow 5knts. They seem to hit best at slack tides. But in Seward, it doesn't seem to matter much. I'd say I prefer when there is some current. When I say "troll" I mean to actually move under power. I like to cur across the current to disperse the scent to the greatest area. I have a Hobie so I can be under power and still jig. But a lot of times, I will just have the weight hit the bottom, then begin to slowly troll with rod in the rod holder. I move slow enough to keep my bait within 5 ft of the bottom. I get a lot of hits trolling.

    In Cook Inlet I don't fish silvers much. Kings will be hot and heavy come September. As early as mid July, I've found silvers off Tonsina or Miller's Landing though its more reliable from mid August or so. I rarely make it out to Caines Head.

    4merguide, I have a few king heads saved up!!! Hoping to give it a go at some point though I think I may save those for my trip to Kodiak!

    Friday, scored a limit of 12 and 15 pounders. Fishing was slow! Used up all of my mojo maybe. Today, I went out and got 5 gallons of herring out of Whittier. Mainly blue tray herring size! Not sure how well they will work for bait. Super Oily and soft. I'm brining them up now to see if they firm up, I like eating them too! But grill them outside, or your entire house will smell like herring for a few days!

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Anyone know this guy?

    Landing sizable halibut fishing Cook Inlet from a 12-foot kayak
    Kevin KlottJuly 9, 2014


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    Avid kayak fisherman Rudy Tsukada of Anchorage took part in the 21st annual Homer Winter King Tournament this March.Courtesy Homer Winter King Salmon Tournament






    The 57-pound halibut Rudy Tsukada caught last month in the Cook Inlet was no small feat. Sure, it wasn’t a barn door by Alaska halibut standards, but then Tsukada isn’t your standard Alaska fisherman, either.
    The 48-year-old from Anchorage caught the flatfish from a kayak.
    RELATED:
    Hardy Alaska kayak anglers trade power for paddles to soak in the beauty
    Gashed, battered and beaten, motorized kayak barely survives turbid Copper River


    Instead of strapping on chest waders or hip boots like many anglers, Tsukada’s routine involves squeezing into a dry suit before heading out on his 12-foot Hobie Outback — a pedal-powered, sit-on-top kayak that provides more stability than a typical sea kayak. It’s rigged with a rod holder, a downrigger and even a fish finder. The geometry of the kayak allows anglers to catch a big one without getting dumped.
    “These kayaks aren’t like the sit-inside kayaks,” Tsukada said. “These are ultra-stable. I catch fish with my feet hanging over the side.”
    On June 20, the day he caught the 57-pounder, Tsukada kept his feet planted firmly in the front of the kayak.
    All hell broke loose

    The fish surfaced without much fuss. But all hell broke loose after he speared it with a harpoon, which was attached to a rope and a buoy the size of a basketball. The halibut thrashed so hard it snapped the 20-pound test rigged to his rod. The only thing connected to the fish was the buoy and the line.
    Usually that’s not a problem. Tsukada just pedals the kayak toward the buoy and retrieves it. But the problem was the buoy disappeared. He looked to his left and to his right. There was no sign of it.
    He wondered if the halibut had either pulled the buoy down deep and swam away for good — or if the rope had wrapped around the kayak’s rudder. The latter would have been bad news.
    “Fishing on a (motorized) boat, any reasonably-sized halibut would be harpooned and cleated off (tying a cleat hitch with the rope around the boat’s metal cleat) the line,” Tsukada explained. “The boat acts like a buoy. You dare not attach anything onto a kayak.”
    All of a sudden, he saw the halibut’s white underside emerging from below. Then, the buoy popped out from beneath the kayak. Tsukada grabbed the line, strapped the trophy-sized halibut to the back of his kayak and headed home.
    An ah-ha moment

    At home, the halibut stretched Tsukada’s measuring tape to 49.5 inches, which calculates to 57 pounds on a weight chart. The maximum amount of weight he can strap to the kayak is 60-70 pounds. Anything bigger and he would just tow it. Sometimes the idea of dragging a fish behind a kayak makes him nervous.
    “I have to admit, I have some fear of orcas,” he said.
    That’s about the only thing about fishing from a kayak that scares Tsukada. As long as the kayaker is outfitted with proper gear, it’s an extremely safe — and healthy — way to fish for salmon, halibut and rockfish, he said.
    “I’m not some adventurist risk taker,” he said. “I’m a desk jockey and this is the only athletic thing I can do. Trolling for 10 hours a day is like going for a walk.
    “It’s a safe, flexible way to access fish.”

    Tsukada, who grew up in Kenai, started fishing from a kayak while living in Seattle. A friend let him borrow a $200 Kmart special.
    “I went to a sheltered bay and hammered rockfish and lingcod,” Tsukada said. “I had a powerboat sitting at the marina, but it was so much easier to throw this 50-pound kayak on top of the car, launch it wherever I wanted and catch fish.
    The ability to land decent lingcod and rockfish off this super flexible, mobile platform — and be safe doing it — was his ah-ha moment.
    These days, Tsukada still owns the powerboat. It’s a 150-horsepower, 21-foot center console that’s been sitting in his friend’s yard ever since he bought the Hobie Outback five years ago.
    “I haven’t even looked at it,” he said.
    The Hobie, he discovered, is much more friendly to his busy work schedule and his wallet. When the weather is good, he can load it to the top of his two-door Civic and fish from a sea-worthy vessel in a matter of hours.
    “A Civic going to Whiskey Gulch and back cost me $60 (in gas),” he said. “You trailer a boat and it’s twice that, at least. Plus you’ve got the launch fees, then a fuel bill on the water that is easily a couple hundred bucks on a big boat.
    “The flexibility is tremendous.”
    Year-round fishing

    Tsukada learned the hard way that wearing a dry suit is the only way to fish safely from a kayak. One day while fishing in chest waders, he accidentally flipped his kayak near Whittier harbor. His personal flotation device kept him afloat, but the weight of the water was too heavy for him to lift himself back onto his kayak.
    “I bought myself a dry suit right away,” he said. “The common misconception is you buy a dry suit to stay warm. It keeps you dry. Keeping the water weight off you is more important than keeping you warm.
    “I’d almost say that a dry suit is mandatory.”
    Tsukada doesn’t just fish during the summer. He targets feeder kings from September to December just off Homer Spit. Then in March, he kicks off the season by participating in the Homer Winter King Salmon Tournament.
    “I fish five times more than I ever did with a powerboat,” he said. “It’s amazing to me that more people don’t do this.”





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