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Thread: Suggestion for Mech for O-200a work/OH, c150 annual

  1. #1
    Member Wldlndfirefghtr's Avatar
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    Default Suggestion for Mech for O-200a work/OH, c150 annual

    Hello all,

    Well the trip bringing up the C150 from WI went well (actually got back May 30th, been on fire assignment), took 6 days and 44.3 hrs. Will post pics and write up later. Just looking for future engine needs and looking for some suggestions for a mech. I know at some point soon a OH will be needed. Looking for someone I can learn from when it comes time for annual. In Fairbanks in the summer and Birchwood in the winter.

    Appreciate the feed back

    Jason

  2. #2

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    Do you annual in the NOV-DEC time frame this is a slower time for most shops and if you find something you can take the time to get the parts. Percision plus at Birchwood is where i would go
    DENNY

  3. #3

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    Lycoming, just put it in a crate and get a factor 0 timed engine. Unless your going to do the overhaul yourself the aggravation of getting it done locally will not be worth any money you MIGHT save. Plus the only way to get a 0 time engine is from the factory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    Lycoming, just put it in a crate and get a factor 0 timed engine. Unless your going to do the overhaul yourself the aggravation of getting it done locally will not be worth any money you MIGHT save. Plus the only way to get a 0 time engine is from the factory.
    How about a Continental instead? He says it is a C150...

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    Lycoming, just put it in a crate and get a factor 0 timed engine. Unless your going to do the overhaul yourself the aggravation of getting it done locally will not be worth any money you MIGHT save. Plus the only way to get a 0 time engine is from the factory.
    It's not a Lycoming... Not sure where you came up with all the aggravation but, there are several great shops all over this state that do excellant work and are easy to work with. Factory rebuilt takes a lot of coin for shipping that should be thought about and it also makes it hard for the Op to learn anything when the motor is several thousand miles away.
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

  6. #6

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    If you need help while in Fairbanks see Vicki at Tamarack or Nathan over at Chena Marina.

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    Three comments come to mind. 1-Talk to your close pilot friends to find a mechanic. The best ones will probably shoo you away without a personal introduction. 2-Most of my C-150 time was spent behind a Lycoming engine. 3-For my money a factory engine is the last choice when doing a re-power. We have a few good local overhaulers but there are several really good choices outside the state, too. Shop around for the overhaul you want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Three comments come to mind. 1-Talk to your close pilot friends to find a mechanic. The best ones will probably shoo you away without a personal introduction. 2-Most of my C-150 time was spent behind a Lycoming engine. 3-For my money a factory engine is the last choice when doing a re-power. We have a few good local overhaulers but there are several really good choices outside the state, too. Shop around for the overhaul you want.
    C-150 had 0-200 Continentals....C-152s had Lycomings generally speaking coming out of the factory....

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    150hp STC in the ones I referred to. Who's engine isn't important to the original question. And frankly I'd rather give the OP some useful advice than spar with that other guy. :-)

  10. #10
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I have had good help from Holiday in Birchwood in the past. Also from Alsworth in Anchorage when my Continental 90 horse needed help a few years back.

    How many hours on the current engine???
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    Member Wldlndfirefghtr's Avatar
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    Yup, it's an O-200A. Probably look at just an OH, and agreed I'll have to call around for quotes. It is a pretty high time engine. FP, it currently has 2437.2 on the engine (last OH was 1994 and reset the time). Total engine time is 4319.7. She has been flown consistently all her life, and last compressions, lowest was 70. Needless to say an OH is coming soon.

    I bought her from a family member, one to have a plane of my own ( I have access to two, but have to ask my FIL to take them out, not a big deal). And two to help him out by selling the plane quickly ( so he could by his motorcycle back).

    Issue now is, as much as like like this 150, cheap to operate and gets be back and forth from/to FBX, I need (want) a bigger plane. Been partial to the 170b's, and guess what, found one I really like that's for sale...lol.

    I digress....

    FP, Terry Holiday is where my FIL takes his planes and he's happy. Labdad, Vicki was also mentioned up there, I'll look into Nathan over at Chena Marina, thanks for that.

    Anyone want to buy a nice 150 so I can afford a 170B :-D.


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  12. #12

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    "The best ones will probably shoo you away without a personal introduction"

    This is why I will send mine back to lycoming when the time comes. The fact that the above quote is necessary is really dramatic. I dont need a secret hand shake to take my truck in for work why should air plane work be any different? But that is the way it is so you can try to spend 10,20, 100 hrs tracking down each mechanic and making phone call after phone call and having to wait to get anything done till Nov or Dec and its still not going to be inexpensive.

    Or you can send it back to the factory and be done with it, yea it will be more expensive but you will save yourself tons of aggravation in the long run AND get a 0 time engine you know was done to factory standards, no phone calls about cost over runs or parts issues or what have you. Oh and if your mechanic gets some "higher priority" client that has some emergency your stuff gets set aside.

    Also I dont know about contenential but lycoming sends me flyers for I think its week long intensive overhaul training classes that they do at their factory, they provide hotel references and shuttle. By the time you track your gas going back and forth dealing with a local shop and trying to juggle the mechanics time with your work schedule and other family time etc I would not be surprised if its a wash, espcially if you consider your time.

    If its a conntinential I would call them direct and see if they have a similar set up to lycoming.

    People on this forum can say what they want about me but I am not making this stuff up, just wait until your actually making the phone calls and trying to get stuff done with Joe bobs buddy who knows a guy who knows a guy. Its not impossible and some times its necessary but unless you get really lucky and find a guy who is willing to truely work with you its a major head ach.

    And almost no one does flat rate work so its REALLY easy for their to be major cost over runs and at 90$/hr you can have an out of control bill real quick. Every pilot I know I real life dreads air craft mx and some just do it on their own without a mech becuase it is such a head ach. I dont know why other posters dislike me, maybe its becuase I refuse to candy coat the situation with aviation, I have even brought it to the FAA's attention that there is a serious lack of IA's in this state for the demand. Its not that working on planes is rocket sciecne its the requirements to have the sign off so its the FAA's job to ensure that people can get it done.

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    Rppearso you really don't have a clue how things work... Lycoming has an overhaul that is not '0' time. Only the new or reman is zero timed. Their school is for maint of engines, I've been through it... Not for overhaul....

    There are plenty of A&Ps/shops out there that can and do put engines together. Maybe they just don't like you....

  14. #14

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    I'm sure Lycoming overhauls are quality work. So are overhauls done at Custom Aircraft in Palmer, Alaskan Aircraft Engines in Anchorage, and many other shops around the state. There are some pretty experienced aviators that feel the in-state options are actually higher quality than factory overhauls. Whether that is true or not I have no idea, but if you spec out an overhaul based on getting the full reman-quality job done, you won't have much in the way of surprises. If you are hoping for less expensive and they keep finding issues with your engine, then yes you can end up getting case work, crank work, and cam work or replacements that you were hoping to avoid. It is really a matter of expectations. They are trying to save you money, but if they can't, so be it.

    The distinct advantage of an in-state overhaul is if you can fly to the overhaul shop and have them do the removal and reinstallation at the shop. Huge added benefit to that approach...
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  15. #15

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    That is true, if you send it in you will have to remove the engine yourself which means you will need an engine hoist and your own hangar space so that could be an issue for a lot of people. I understood that all lycombing did was remanufactures and that's how you get the 0 time. I figure lycombing built the engine so they ought to know it the best. Im sure local shops do good work but its not without complication, I know at least one other person that just had an overhaul recently and he was not happy during the entire time it was being done and it took way longer than he expected and cost way more. I guess if I had to make a comparison, I just bought a new truck and dealing with the dealership has been a breath of fresh air (that tells you how bad aviation is when it was a joy working with a dealership), the customer service is awesome, no secret hand shakes, stuff gets scheduled and completed within a reasonable time frame even for major work. They give you up front flat rate pricing for a given item (bed liner, etc). Then you go back to dealing with your plane ...... lol

    That's why I like working with the manufacturer of my plane and engine, they pick up the phone, hey how can we help you what parts do you need, etc etc. They even do custom work and make custom parts for a low flat rate gasp. Some of the smaller stuff it does not make sense to ship out but I might start doing it once I get tired of running around to places that are only open from 9 to 4 (right when im also at work) and making endless phone calls.

    Maybe the OP will have better luck, make a phone call or 2 the guy likes him and gets him right in, but if not then there is still a way, all is not lost.

    I relooked at my flyer and they have an assembly disassembly class as well as the mx class at lycombing which is effectively an overhaul.


    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    I'm sure Lycoming overhauls are quality work. So are overhauls done at Custom Aircraft in Palmer, Alaskan Aircraft Engines in Anchorage, and many other shops around the state. There are some pretty experienced aviators that feel the in-state options are actually higher quality than factory overhauls. Whether that is true or not I have no idea, but if you spec out an overhaul based on getting the full reman-quality job done, you won't have much in the way of surprises. If you are hoping for less expensive and they keep finding issues with your engine, then yes you can end up getting case work, crank work, and cam work or replacements that you were hoping to avoid. It is really a matter of expectations. They are trying to save you money, but if they can't, so be it.

    The distinct advantage of an in-state overhaul is if you can fly to the overhaul shop and have them do the removal and reinstallation at the shop. Huge added benefit to that approach...

  16. #16

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    "Maybe they just don't like you" - if a business can afford to turn away work because they don't like you then that is a solid case for needing more IA's. I have never walked into carr's and had the manager say sorry you cant buy that because we don't like the way you stand or your voice (I know im not the best looking guy but geez, its not like im asking out the prom queen). I know exactly how things work, when I tried to get some work done in april it was like asking for a private tour of the white house, I understand that's spring and people want to fly but the FAA should be producing enough IA's so that that situation does not exist. I know a lot of people who do stuff themselves and don't get sign offs because the mechs are inundated with work from like late march to October which is when you, me and everyone else wants to get surprise work done so we can fly. Unless you have a hangar no one wants to work on stuff in the winter.

    I might get a few details off from time to time but I have been around the block with trying to schedule a mechanic to get something done in a reasonable time frame and to get a hard quote so im not emptying my retirement account to glue some fabric on. I have also found stuff mechanics screwed up on when I bought my plane that was really dangerous so now I either do my own work and have a mech inspect and sign off or I am intimately involved with what the mech is doing. Nothing happens to anything on my plane unless I am watching every screw and bolt, im the one that's going to die if something gets screwed up not the mechanic.

    Its all duable but the OP has no idea how much time and energy will be spent trying to chase mechanics and get things scheduled and then get them to commit to a quote.

    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    Rppearso you really don't have a clue how things work... Lycoming has an overhaul that is not '0' time. Only the new or reman is zero timed. Their school is for maint of engines, I've been through it... Not for overhaul....

    There are plenty of A&Ps/shops out there that can and do put engines together. Maybe they just don't like you....

  17. #17

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    Also thinking about it some more, it probably does not help me that my plane does not sit outside .... ever. So if I have to take my plane somewhere its going to be in a hangar the entire time or im not bringing it somewhere. IF you can let your plane sit outside and let the mech do the hangar shuffle then things might be exponentially easier. I took my plane to talkeetna for a burger once and I tied it down around the landing gear and was not an enjoyable burger because the mountain must have been visible because everyone and their mom was out and all it takes is one idiot kicking up gravel to chip my paint.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    Also thinking about it some more, it probably does not help me that my plane does not sit outside .... ever. So if I have to take my plane somewhere its going to be in a hangar the entire time or im not bringing it somewhere. IF you can let your plane sit outside and let the mech do the hangar shuffle then things might be exponentially easier. I took my plane to talkeetna for a burger once and I tied it down around the landing gear and was not an enjoyable burger because the mountain must have been visible because everyone and their mom was out and all it takes is one idiot kicking up gravel to chip my paint.
    Sounds like you have a glass plane. Are you seriously bothered by tying down while eating a burger? What fun is that? How can you call someone an "idiot" for kicking up a rock? Do you feel they do that on purpose? Shows your way of thinking.
    You have made several interesting points though htat don't fall in line with the typical "Alaskan" pilot. It seems you have very high demands that would be difficult to accomidate in Alaska. Sorta like going to Burger King and expecting a rib eye. Your demands are limiting you to the available help or services you require. every mechanic out there has the right to turn someone away. If you keep getting turned away then maybe your demands exceed the mechanics tolerance. Like it or not, I don't treat people I don't like the same as people I do. If I like you I will go the extra mile. It's simple human nature. I don't think mechanics are hurting for business up here. Asking for all your requiremnets in the spring will narrow your list of possible mechanics dramaticly.
    With that said, be careful of the advice you give. Your over the top requirements don't fit the bill of the average pilot in this state. Your experiances will differ from the normal guys. Matter of fact, you seem to have the most difficult time of anyone to find a mechanic.
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  19. #19

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    I am not rude in person but it can ware on someone when its like finding the lost arch of the covenant to get anything done. You are right no one has to do anything which forces smart people to find alternatives. All I am doing is giving my experiences and how I delt with it, don't give up flying just because you cant get work done. At the end of the day you can buy the tools and do it yourself when it comes right down to it, take 51% of the plane apart and put it back together and get your repairmans cert. Its probably a lot of paperwork to up grade (or down grade if you try to resell it) a certified plane to an experimental and then get the repairmans cert. Where there is a will there is a way. Or sell the certified plane and buy an experimental. Certified planes are a head ach to own but they are easier to resell. Just buy the plane you really want and you wont have to worry about it.

    There are ALOT of other things you can do as well but its not legal and I cant list them on here, if the FAA wants to stop that sort of activity maybe they should issue a lot more IA's and make the demand a little more elastic.

    All its going to take the OP is doing a spring pre-flight and finding some nasty mx item to see what its all about. Saying that your limited in the spring and early summer is putting it lightly, its a highly inelastic market and that's the FAA's fault.

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    Sounds like you have a glass plane. Are you seriously bothered by tying down while eating a burger? What fun is that? How can you call someone an "idiot" for kicking up a rock? Do you feel they do that on purpose? Shows your way of thinking.
    You have made several interesting points though htat don't fall in line with the typical "Alaskan" pilot. It seems you have very high demands that would be difficult to accomidate in Alaska. Sorta like going to Burger King and expecting a rib eye. Your demands are limiting you to the available help or services you require. every mechanic out there has the right to turn someone away. If you keep getting turned away then maybe your demands exceed the mechanics tolerance. Like it or not, I don't treat people I don't like the same as people I do. If I like you I will go the extra mile. It's simple human nature. I don't think mechanics are hurting for business up here. Asking for all your requiremnets in the spring will narrow your list of possible mechanics dramaticly.
    With that said, be careful of the advice you give. Your over the top requirements don't fit the bill of the average pilot in this state. Your experiances will differ from the normal guys. Matter of fact, you seem to have the most difficult time of anyone to find a mechanic.

  20. #20
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    I've been involved in aviation since 1966 or so and find with very few exceptions , mechanics are hard working, honest people. Repo I don't know how long you've been around but I've not read very many positive thing from you about mechanics, this may be the root of your problem. A antagonistic attitude, even when you are repressing it does come thru, people aren't stupid. There is a great deal of personal pride in being a mechanic and many would be turned off and insulted by your approach and demands. I'm sorry to say that, but that my 2C. I hope you find a good mechanic to work with.

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