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Thread: Fishing Out of Whittier

  1. #1
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default Fishing Out of Whittier

    OK, ran the boat out of Whittier last weekend for shrimpies and a little fishing for 'buts and rockfish. We dropped our pots at the falls and took off for Culross Passage. We fished on the S side of Crafton Island on a sandy bottom. After about 4 hours of fishing, we picked up 4 chickens from 5 of us fishing. We moved down to the South side of Chenaga and fished about an hour and a half with zip, nada, niente to show for it.

    Q: Are we still too far north in the Sound for halibut this time of year? This is my first year fishing out of Whittier, and I have to say it's a lot slower than my experiences out of Homer and Seward. I did not mark any baitfish in the water out there, which is usually where I focus a lot of my fishing efforts.

    We did pick up a couple of pretty copper rockfish on the way back, along with some other rockfish I didn't even recognize - almost looked like a type of cod with turquoise spots. Oh yeah, the shrimp pots yielded only about 2 dozen shrimp, 3 octopi, and the largest 10 legged starfish I've ever seen. Wonder how you cook those?

    I appreciate any feedback, advice, help I can get, the sound is a pretty big place (not to mention impressive too! - If I can start finding fish there, I don't know if I want to go all they way to Homer or even to Seward, as they don't compare to the Sound).

    Cheers,

    SH

  2. #2
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default

    I have fished for "Butt" around Lone Island. This is my second season in PWS. I have been told you have to fish deeper than Cook Inlet, around 300-400 ft and concentrate on "shelves.

    Still trying to figure things out too.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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  3. #3

    Default type of LING cod with turquoise spots

    They are type of ling cod with turquoise spots, related to the Ling Cod and they are clled Green-ling. They are a very good eating fish and some times you can see a blue or green tint to the meat.

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Default

    AkPiranha nailed it, and they are tasty. Not uncommon for their flesh to have the same color characteristics as the spots (blue to blue-green meat).



    Abbreviated Life History of Kelp Greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus)

    The kelp greenling is in the family of Hexagrammidae and shares this taxonomic relationship with lingcod. The kelp greenling is one of the most conspicuous fishes in rocky nearshore habitats, occurring often in and around kelp beds. The male and female look so different that they were first described as separate species. The body color is variable in both sexes, ranging from light gray to brown. Males, however, have large irregular blue patches anteriorly, while females are uniformly covered with smaller dark spots.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
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  5. #5
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default where you were shrimping

    is known for octapuss. We were told this by a guy in whittier, local I believe and he said 4'ers are common there. I had 2'er in my pots. I gave it to a buddy and he said it was awesome. Skinned it and then put the legs on sticks and grilled it over an open flame. Caught another one but smaller and that will be for my big butt in homer. I have caught halibut in south culross in april and were decent 30-50#ers in 125 feet of water on a shelf. also some huge black bass.

  6. #6
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default Thanks to all

    Will spend more time prospecting this weekend. I hope to see you on the water - just give "Sierra Hotel" a shout on the radio - I monitor channel 16.

    The kelp greenling is exactly what we were catching (thanks Alaskahippie!). Now that I know they're good eating I won't be so quick to throw them back!

    Cheers,

    SH

  7. #7
    Member Arcticwildman's Avatar
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    Default PWS halibut

    Try fishing around Knight Island and Disk Island. Seal Island can be good as well but you will need to anchor up and generate a scent trail so the fish will come to you.

    There is a shelf by Disk Island that can have really good fishing if you catch the tide right. Just prepared to fish deep (300-400 feet). If you aren't up for the deep water fishing, fish the rocky points/outcroppings in 75-175 feet of water with a big lead head jig. Usually you can catch a tide rip and drift along the shoreline and cover a lot of water.

    A little further out, the Smith Islands have good fishing also but you have to watch the water pretty closely as it blows up really fast and you can find yourself in some nasty seas before you know it.

    If you have enough gas and your boat is big enough for a safety margain, shoot for Hinchenbrook Entrance or Green Island. Both have excellent halibut and Ling Cod fishing.

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