Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: What parts and tools do you take in your small boat?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    466

    Default What parts and tools do you take in your small boat?

    Just curious, it occured to me answering a question offline that many of you would be good folks for me to emulate. So I am asking, "What spare parts and tools do you take with you for your small boat and smallish outboard?"

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    466

    Default

    On interior rivers I take a spare prop. My spare is already greased up and reacdy to slide on the shaft. With the wrench I would need to replace it.

    One spare spark plug for each cylinder on the motor, pre-gapped in the comfort of my garage, with the tool to change 'em.

    Spare impeller sometimes. Pretty random on that. They are a pain in the neck to change on my engine, lots of tools I need once - but the times I leave it home I spend a lot of time hoping I don't need it. The times I take a spare impeller and all the tools I enjoy the trip more once I have everything loaded in the boat.

    I had an aluminum repair kit for my aluminum hull boat. Never needed it. Do they suck? Worth the space they take up?

    I think that's it for spares in my boat...

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,031

    Default

    An assortment of spare props from the way worn (they're physically smaller due to all the wear) to the newer prop and plus one with a more aggressive pitch to try. Also there's a 99 cent kit for my motor (Tohatsu) with the parts that you'll drop into the water while changing your prop; that's always a good thing to have in the bottom of your tool bin. I don't bring a heavy socket set. Just a plug wrench and other hand tools.

    Engine oil, lower end oil (enough to refill it), liquid gasket, assorted little pipe clampers, zip ties. If my motor were older I'd carry bailing wire too; probably should anyway.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Thanks for starting this thread Scott. So much to think about.

  5. #5

    Default

    Similar to what others have said already. It depends on what engine type you have as to what you might be able to fix in the field and what types of parts/tools you will need. One hint is to try to do any engine maintenance when at home by using just the tools you have in your field tool kit. That will help you to find those odd tools you may not have in there that you could need when trying to do a similar thing in the field. You might have a crescent wrench in you tool kit, but maybe it happens to be a tad bit too thick or long to fit into the space you need it to for a particular part. You may not realize this until you have to get in there that one time.

    Our trips tend to be longer and end up going downstream on the way in. There is no option to float out to an alternate take out point and no guarantee that there will be anyone else in the area to assist if we have engine problems. As a result of that, we go a bit overkill on our spare parts, but we've been able to come out under our own power every time for 35+ years, so we are doing something right.

    Spare props for each engine (like familyman, they range in wear, so we have more worn props for thin water and better props for big water where we are not likely to hit bottom).
    Spare spark plugs (including proper wrench to fit).
    Locking needlenose pliers for pulling the cotter pins for prop changes (locking helps to keep from dropping the pin and also hangs onto it so you don't forget where you set the **** thing down).
    Spare cotter pins and lock nut for props. (or shear pins if your motor uses them)
    Spare water pump.
    Spare drive shaft (we've gotten good at changing them from experience....)
    Spare lower unit oil (at least enough for one change, often double that).
    Spare lower unit (usually running multiple matching engines on our trips, and easier to change the lower unit sometimes than some other potential repairs). Heck, we usually bring a whole spare engine with us.
    Spare fuel hose.
    Spare prime bulb.
    Good supply of hose clamps of various sizes (including tool to tighten/loosen as needed).
    2-part epoxy.
    Patch material for fuel cans (see other thread regarding bears liking to bite into plastic fuel cans).
    I'm sure there are other things that aren't jumping to mind off the top of my head, but these are most of the primary things.

    The final and probably most crucial "tool" is a sat phone. When all your other parts and tools can't get the job done, the sat phone is your last option.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default

    Hmmmm....

    I just finished reading "The Outboard Boater's Handbook" by David Gretchell, and his treatment of this issue is dramatically different than my own, and certainly that of anchskier. His theory is to take a spare engine rather than a lot of tools and parts. Of course, he is writing to a broader audience than us powered canoeist (although he has a section just for us). For a person in a 20 ft Lund Alaskan, an auxiliary spare outboard is doable; how do a strap a second outboard on the back of my my Sport Boat? But I certainly like the idea of having the spare engine.

    In response to anchskier I ask: How do you find room for a spare lower end unit in your canoe? Your list is exhaustive, if nothing else, but I just don't see how you could get it all in a canoe, and still have much useful load left.

    In my view, a spare prop, prop nut, and cotter pins, with associated tooling, is an absolute necessity in any boat. I run older OMC 2-strokes, so a generous supply of shear pins is, likewise, an absolutely necessity and another reason for the prop removal tools. (The slip clutch in my 4 stroke might be the thing that helps me convert fully to that newer technology, but I will resist as long as I can.) I do't see much need to carry spark plugs, but they are small and light so no reason to leave them behind, either. I once thought of carrying a spare ignition system, as condensers and coils are, like spark plugs, small and light, but I would need a huge strap wrench to pull the flywheel, so I kayboshed that. Plus, if I Carry ignition parts, then I need to carry an ignition spark tester. This stuff all adds up exponentially. Besides, if you do your due diligence in the garage before setting out, you shouldn't have too many issue of that magnitude.

    I should thing having repair materials for things that will break due to the environment (cracked aluminum for hitting underwater obstructions, leaks, etc.) should get some consideration. Fast cure marine adhesive sealant to seal leaky rivets (for us in aluminum canoes) or a fiberglass repair kit, etc. JB Weld for the lower unit, 2-part epoxy for the fuel tank. The spare fuel bulb is a good idea. I hadn't thought of before. Some way to repair a fuel line, either a sealant of some sort, but I would think spare with an inside diameter matching the outside diameter of you normal hose, and hose clamps, so as to space your hose, would be better.

    it is difficult to find the balance between enough parts for an engine overhaul and not even the basic, prudent kit. Experience is the best teacher in this area.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Hmmmm....

    I just finished reading "The Outboard Boater's Handbook" by David Gretchell, and his treatment of this issue is dramatically different than my own, and certainly that of anchskier. His theory is to take a spare engine rather than a lot of tools and parts. Of course, he is writing to a broader audience than us powered canoeist (although he has a section just for us). For a person in a 20 ft Lund Alaskan, an auxiliary spare outboard is doable; how do a strap a second outboard on the back of my my Sport Boat? But I certainly like the idea of having the spare engine.

    In response to anchskier I ask: How do you find room for a spare lower end unit in your canoe? Your list is exhaustive, if nothing else, but I just don't see how you could get it all in a canoe, and still have much useful load left.

    In my view, a spare prop, prop nut, and cotter pins, with associated tooling, is an absolute necessity in any boat. I run older OMC 2-strokes, so a generous supply of shear pins is, likewise, an absolutely necessity and another reason for the prop removal tools. (The slip clutch in my 4 stroke might be the thing that helps me convert fully to that newer technology, but I will resist as long as I can.) I do't see much need to carry spark plugs, but they are small and light so no reason to leave them behind, either. I once thought of carrying a spare ignition system, as condensers and coils are, like spark plugs, small and light, but I would need a huge strap wrench to pull the flywheel, so I kayboshed that. Plus, if I Carry ignition parts, then I need to carry an ignition spark tester. This stuff all adds up exponentially. Besides, if you do your due diligence in the garage before setting out, you shouldn't have too many issue of that magnitude.

    I should thing having repair materials for things that will break due to the environment (cracked aluminum for hitting underwater obstructions, leaks, etc.) should get some consideration. Fast cure marine adhesive sealant to seal leaky rivets (for us in aluminum canoes) or a fiberglass repair kit, etc. JB Weld for the lower unit, 2-part epoxy for the fuel tank. The spare fuel bulb is a good idea. I hadn't thought of before. Some way to repair a fuel line, either a sealant of some sort, but I would think spare with an inside diameter matching the outside diameter of you normal hose, and hose clamps, so as to space your hose, would be better.

    it is difficult to find the balance between enough parts for an engine overhaul and not even the basic, prudent kit. Experience is the best teacher in this area.
    We are always traveling with at least 2 boats, and frequently 3 or more. Usually an average of about 3 people per 2 boats, give or take. A lower unit doesn't take up much room at all (we run 15hp 2-stroke outboards). It slips down the side between things pretty easily or sets on top of a bin. We do often bring a full spare engine on these trips. It takes a good chunk of room and weight capacity, but we've had to use it a few times before so it has justified it's need to us. Depending on the trip, we sometimes opt to stash the spare engine part way along the trip, somewhere within reasonable range if we end up needing it (so we can make a run with the other boat to go get it). Where we go is not easy on equipment and, like I mentioned, we can not count on getting any help from others or having the option to just float/paddle our way back if needed. We pretty much need to be under power to make it back and thus have to usually take a bit more than we would in other situations. If we had the option to just float out to a different take out point if something went wrong, we would surely bring a lot less stuff.

    I won't deny it, we do bring a lot of stuff with us for these trips, but I can also say that in 35+ years of doing this, we have never (knock on wood...) needed any outside assistance of any kind to get home under our own power.

  8. #8
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    somebody mentioned jb weld. I can tell you from experience, before y'all get too whacky with hypothetical good ideas, that jb well is crap, absolutely worthless. It soaks up water, and won't stick to aluminum at all. When the water gets to it, seems to have the strength of a water logged piece of ceramic.

    the jet boater guys use some sort of aluminum-specific stick of stuff. That stuff is slightly better, if you can get some stove heat on it.

    things that have gone bad over the years:

    bad ball valves in the primer bulb

    fuel lines failing due to age and the cold.

    broken spark plug boot

    I too usually just bring a spare motor, though when I started running a copperhead, I don't anymore.

    fm mentioned bailing wire, that stuff has saved the day on a few in-field repairs that I've both performed, and witnessed.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sandpoint, ID
    Posts
    1,969

    Default

    Stainless aircraft safety wire and safety wire pliers...plus the prop and engine stuff mentioned above. Never need it but nice to have just in case.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    what ever you get for a tool kit get a Ammo can, paint it fire red / oramge , so you can find it if you do tip ovr an every thing goes into the river, if you can't find one, drop me a line an pick it up as I do have a couple empty in the shed in the back yard , make sure you pit some rubber on the bottom
    so it don't beat a hole in the bottom of your canoe over the years use ,& it is water proff , [it will be free ]

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Sid, you are a glutton for punishment!!

    Remember the hell you went through the last time you tried to give something away on this forum. LOL

  12. #12

    Default

    Get a cheap step stool with storage, and put a fish on seat bracket, seat and storage for your canoe.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    Stainless aircraft safety wire and safety wire pliers...plus the prop and engine stuff mentioned above. Never need it but nice to have just in case.
    Ding ding ding WINNER!!!! I love that stuff. (Of course, that's because I'm an A&P-or was). For a canoe tool kit, I recommend d just getting the Chi-com safety wire pliers with no reverse ($20-ish online at places like Harbor Freight, Wholesale tool, and Aircraft Spruce). I don't often, as in never, red come d cheap or Chinesium tools, but for a boat kit that could be easily lost in a capsize, and an almost never use item, they'll do. If you want top quality, the Mil Bars are best and then the Snap-ons (I have a pair of each, plus the chinesiums).

    A good local source in Anchorage for the wire is Reeves on Merrill Field. .032 is a good all around size, but .025 is easier to work with. Skip the Inconel. It cost more because it's super hi temp. Just get the stainless.

    BTW get the 6" pliers, not the 9"; they pack better and you rarely need to make those long runs of safety wire, even on a plane. plus they fit into to hard to reach places better.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default

    I'm still trying to figure out how you would carry a spare motor and what would you carry. I keep looking at the size and weight (mostly the weight) of an outboard, and looking at my canoe, I just don't see it. Also, what are you guys carrying as a spare-same horsepower and model as your main engine, or something smaller?

    I think I could carry a 50 pound thrust electric, but that requires a heavy battery. It would hang right on the transom, in the corner. (Fad and I did this when we fished Jon boat type bass tournaments.) Still, for this auxiliary use, it would seem better to stay with a gas engine, just o avoid the battery weight, but that would require something like a 2-3 hp just to have room for it.

    If running my 9.9, I "guess" I could use my 4 hp as my spare...maybe.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I'm still trying to figure out how you would carry a spare motor and what would you carry. I keep looking at the size and weight (mostly the weight) of an outboard, and looking at my canoe, I just don't see it. Also, what are you guys carrying as a spare-same horsepower and model as your main engine, or something smaller?

    I think I could carry a 50 pound thrust electric, but that requires a heavy battery. It would hang right on the transom, in the corner. (Fad and I did this when we fished Jon boat type bass tournaments.) Still, for this auxiliary use, it would seem better to stay with a gas engine, just o avoid the battery weight, but that would require something like a 2-3 hp just to have room for it.

    If running my 9.9, I "guess" I could use my 4 hp as my spare...maybe.
    In our case, we are running 19' Grumman Freighter canoes with 15hp outboards. Spare motor is equal, either 15hp or 9.9hp, but they are the same size so no real difference. The spare goes in the rear compartment just behind the middle seat on one side. Pack around it. It is a heavy "extra" to bring along, but like I mentioned above, we have no way to rely on outside assistance in most of our trips, so we take the hit on losing the weight capacity in trade for the safety aspect of knowing we can get ourselves out reasonably. If we have a specific need to go lighter, we may opt to not bring the spare and just rely on spare parts and possibly having to tow one boat with another to get out, but would much prefer to not rely on that if we don't have to. If we were going upstream on the way in and could just float out if something happened, we would not worry about a spare either. Even if it was just lake travel and you could paddle out or towing was an easier option we wouldn't worry about a spare.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I'm still trying to figure out how you would carry a spare motor and what would you carry. I keep looking at the size and weight (mostly the weight) of an outboard, and looking at my canoe, I just don't see it. Also, what are you guys carrying as a spare-same horsepower and model as your main engine, or something smaller?

    I think I could carry a 50 pound thrust electric, but that requires a heavy battery. It would hang right on the transom, in the corner. (Fad and I did this when we fished Jon boat type bass tournaments.) Still, for this auxiliary use, it would seem better to stay with a gas engine, just o avoid the battery weight, but that would require something like a 2-3 hp just to have room for it.

    If running my 9.9, I "guess" I could use my 4 hp as my spare...maybe.

    My suggestion is to never hunt down stream and get out and start looking for an area to hunt that is the only way you are going to learn what you need to carry.

    Good hunting

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    My suggestion is to never hunt down stream.

    Good hunting
    I thought about that over the last few days. What length do you go to to be sure to hunt up stream? If it means traveling 2-3 days upriver to your chosen hunting area, as compared to traveling one day...

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I thought about that over the last few days. What length do you go to to be sure to hunt up stream? If it means traveling 2-3 days upriver to your chosen hunting area, as compared to traveling one day...
    For me I have to hunt federal land. Maybe state land? But I have to hunt up stream or across the river then head up stream. I'm amazed at what everyone carries. I think I'm going have to start out super slow. Lol.

    Ive be already had an offer by someone to haul me out and drop me off. But I think I'm going to use the motor to get to my area then float the rest of the way.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default

    I always carried a bucket...to tie up under the outboard when changing props/etc. to catch the parts I dropped...ask me how I learned that one! Boat Safer! Mike

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •