Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Salmon in kelp and avoiding rockfish.

  1. #1

    Default Salmon in kelp and avoiding rockfish.

    I have heard many times by reputable anglers that hugging the kelp or rock piles can be productive for kings. That said, the few times I have tried trolling or mooching along kelp I got in to large black rockfish schools that obviously kept me from effectively fishing. I could troll faster but I have heard big kings tend to like a slower presentation (assuming gear works effectively at that speed). Thanks in advance for any help. I want one of those 40+ kelp kings!

  2. #2

    Default

    It just takes a lot of trial and error learning which rockpiles/kelp lines are safe to fish for kings, without being covered up in rockfish. Some of the better spots we fish have a wash rock, with sand in front.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    ...trial and error learning which rockpiles/kelp lines are safe to fish for kings, without being covered up in rockfish.
    That's it in a nutshell. I'm always on the lookout for places without the rockfish, and I come back to those looking for kings. Also helps to stick to shallower depths around the rocks and kelp. Seasonally anyway, the rockfish only come so shallow, while the kings come lots shallower than most people realize. We get so close and tight we call it "playing bumper cars."

    Today I was by myself and played bumper cars, but missed two, lost one and landed two in about 3 hours. Quarters were so tight and turns so sharp I had to quit using the drop weights I prefer and switch to the downrigger with the bait back only about 15'. And I never had more than 10' of wire out of the downrigger! Everyone fishing deeper was cussing the rockfish and gray cod, but I never got a one.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks guys. Sounds like its trial and error time. I am going to be "handtrolling" the summer king opener with sport rods. I was hoping to avoid the power trollers and hang tight in kelp. Now I know the best bet is to start scouting exclusively kelp lines despite the fact if I have some better open spots. I think this is going to be fun!

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elhewman View Post
    ...best bet is to start scouting exclusively kelp lines despite the fact if I have some better open spots....
    You got it. They move in and out, up and down, wherever there's food and the right conditions for easy feeding. I haven't figured out how to guess which consistently, but if I'm not finding them deep I don't hang around hoping and wishing they'll show up sooner or later. Same for shallow.

  6. #6
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    What Brown Bear said, also, at least for me, I crank the speed up, nothing less than 2.4kts over ground. Kings can catch that bait, no problems. Also, planer boards help fish those tight waters without spooking those shallow fish as well as makes me a little less nervous about bumping a rock I didnt; know about.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

    Blaze N Abel Charters
    Kodiak, AK
    www.alaska-fish.com
    https://www.facebook.com/BlazeNAbelCharters/?fref=ts

  7. #7

    Default

    Good stuff guys. Great Advise on planer boards I will give that a try! Any recommendations on what type? Are you using them in conjunction with weights or divers? I could see some advantage into getting into the nooks and crannies with that technique.

  8. #8
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    If inlines, run offhsores for planer boards and jsut a 2-4oz lead.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

    Blaze N Abel Charters
    Kodiak, AK
    www.alaska-fish.com
    https://www.facebook.com/BlazeNAbelCharters/?fref=ts

  9. #9

    Default

    How are they on sharp turns? We've used them down south for slow trolling striped bass, sails and tuna, but that's wide open water.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Also helps to stick to shallower depths around the rocks and kelp.

    And I never had more than 10' of wire out of the downrigger
    Ok, I got the part about running the downrigger 10' deep ... how deep (or shallow) is the water you're doing this in?

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek the Greek View Post
    Ok, I got the part about running the downrigger 10' deep ... how deep (or shallow) is the water you're doing this in?
    I know the areas we fish real well, and will come into 15' with 10' out. Some places demand shallower, so in them I'm only running out 5' of wire. Feels kinda foolish to look down and see the balls, but the fish will make it a happy sight. With 5' out I get a little light footed when the sounder ventures shallower than 8', but it's really no problem. I'm using metal flashers or fishing with none and only 20-25' of line out though- the plastic ones are bad for sailing up on top when you get in water less than 10', but the metal track straight and true.

    To tell the truth, all of our kings this year have come from water less than 20' deep. We've pulled seven and lost several others from 8' or less so far. Fun stuff, because the kings are rockets in such shallow water. Like I said though, "bumper cars" until you get to know an area real well. The big green button on top of Scotty electrics should be red instead, because is actually a PANIC button for when you find a new shallow spot.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I know the areas we fish real well, and will come into 15' with 10' out. Some places demand shallower, so in them I'm only running out 5' of wire. Feels kinda foolish to look down and see the balls, but the fish will make it a happy sight. With 5' out I get a little light footed when the sounder ventures shallower than 8', but it's really no problem. I'm using metal flashers or fishing with none and only 20-25' of line out though- the plastic ones are bad for sailing up on top when you get in water less than 10', but the metal track straight and true.

    To tell the truth, all of our kings this year have come from water less than 20' deep. We've pulled seven and lost several others from 8' or less so far. Fun stuff, because the kings are rockets in such shallow water. Like I said though, "bumper cars" until you get to know an area real well. The big green button on top of Scotty electrics should be red instead, because is actually a PANIC button for when you find a new shallow spot.
    Huh. I can think of a couple places that fit this description - shallow rocks with kelp -and have always avoided them. Would love to try it, but have a feeling that my family & friends would not listen very well about how shallow to run our gear ...

    ... perhaps if I get a day to myself I'll give it a shot.

  13. #13

    Default

    Well worth it!

    When you get shallow, conditions get important. In my area it's generally bait in the shallows, incoming tide, overcast with a little chop. Too bright, too slick, little bait or falling tide, it's pretty blank. But if bright and flat with bait, look just a little deeper for kings waiting to ambush stragglers or make quick dashes into the shallows. I start shallow, then work a little deeper with each pass.

    Have fun!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •