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Thread: Froglube Longterm Performance?

  1. #1
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    Default Froglube Longterm Performance?

    Rancid Crabtree's excellent post comparing different products for firearm lubrication and corrosion protection has really got me thinkin about trying Froglube. I've read other posts on other sites where some people are having problems with Froglube migrating into trigger groups etc. and gumming up causing problems in cold weather.

    I could attribute their problems to consumers not following the manufacturers instructions as they specifically state to essentially wipe it all off the gun leaving a very thin film behind and in the pores of the metal to protect the surface. However, since the product is biodegradable it should degrade over time.

    If it degrades, I would assume its protective properties also degrade? If so, what's the point of using it, as all short term use eventually becomes long term use resulting in degradation unless you strip it from the metal periodically and start over.

    Have any of you been using it? If so, how has it performed up here in Alaska?

    How have you been applying it when you don't have access to a heat gun in hunting camp and the daily temps are well below what the manufacturer recommends for heating the metal?

    Any info you can share will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by sep View Post
    Rancid Crabtree's excellent post comparing different products for firearm lubrication and corrosion protection has really got me thinkin about trying Froglube. I've read other posts on other sites where some people are having problems with Froglube migrating into trigger groups etc. and gumming up causing problems in cold weather.

    I could attribute their problems to consumers not following the manufacturers instructions as they specifically state to essentially wipe it all off the gun leaving a very thin film behind and in the pores of the metal to protect the surface. However, since the product is biodegradable it should degrade over time.

    If it degrades, I would assume its protective properties also degrade? If so, what's the point of using it, as all short term use eventually becomes long term use resulting in degradation unless you strip it from the metal periodically and start over.

    Have any of you been using it? If so, how has it performed up here in Alaska?

    How have you been applying it when you don't have access to a heat gun in hunting camp and the daily temps are well below what the manufacturer recommends for heating the metal?

    Any info you can share will be greatly appreciated.
    I'm wondering why you would even consider using a lube that does that, or even MIGHT do that. (mess up your trigger, gumming up the works, and causing problems in cold weather.)

    BTW, what is the problem you would hope to solve by using Froglube, other than the problem ITSELF may cause.

    We had a thread here about Froglube a while back. Aren't there numerous lubes available, that work just fine?

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  3. #3
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    The problems experienced by people gumming up their guns can generally always be attributed to people applying it wrong. If it's applied wrong, it works poorly. That's not the products fault.

    I've had frog lube on one of my firearms for about a year now. It did fine this past winter. I followed the instructions and heated it up with a hair dryer. Applied, let dry, wipe off until there is nothing left on the metal. It only needs to be 100 degs or so. So if you have a small oven or heater it would be plenty. It doesn't need to be that hot.

    As for biodegradable, if you re-apply it periodically, it won't ever completely disappear right?

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    Smitty of the North,

    I'm interested for several reasons. First, I want a product to protect blued gun metal in a coastal climate primarily during blacktail hunts. Second, the camo on the shotguns (barrels) I use during duck season can be destroyed if wiped down with lubricants containing solvents. At least that's what the manufacturer states. Froglube sounds perfect for these camo surfaces and if you believe the test results previously mentioned would be good for blued rifles as well. Lastly, if I find a product which works better than the one I'm currently using, I generally switch to it.

    Mobius,

    I appreciate the info. If it's reapplied it won't disappear but there is something a little odd about refreshing decaying plant matter on my rifles by replacing it with fresh decaying plant matter!

  5. #5
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    Looking at Rancid Crabtree's post and continuing post on his amazing test of gun care products it appears only two products remain rust free after over 20 days in the elements.
    WD40 specialist is the only other product still in the running.
    He obviously tried a heck of a lot of products most designed for the purpose and some not.
    So all the other 32 products but one have failed after 20+ days of testing and you question the #1 rated product?
    So I guess my question is if not frog lube what then? What other product would you use when all but one other has failed?
    Go ahead and use one of the other products on his list. Other than WD40 specialist hey are guaranteed to fail on you long before Froglube ever will.
    And I don't know of another product he could have tested so......
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by sep View Post
    Mobius,

    I appreciate the info. If it's reapplied it won't disappear but there is something a little odd about refreshing decaying plant matter on my rifles by replacing it with fresh decaying plant matter!
    lol, to be frank, isn't that what oil is, eventually anyway?

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    Moving to AK soon. I've been using Frog Lube in the Florida Everglades for two years now. The climate here is brutal on guns. Hands down the it's best rust inhibitor I've used on firearms. Hairdryer is all that's needed. My guess is it would work just fine in the cold too. Couple of buddies still in the military talked me into using it in the bore too. I warm everything up with the hairdryer, smear Frog Lube on with my bare hands, use a toothbrush to get it in the nooks/tight spots then liberally patch the already cleaned bore then let it sit for an hour or so. Go over the whole gun with a cloth and run a few dry patches through the bore. I don't use it on my triggers though. If you have not tried Frog Lube give it a chance.

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    I'm actually interested in trying the product that's why I posted here to find out if others have used it in our climate. It's the only biodegradable one on the list and I don't think petroleum based products are biodegradable in the same sense as plant matter. That's why I asked the question. It appears to offer really good lubricity and corrosion protection. The downside is you have to heat the metal and apparently it degrades over time. I've not found that to be the case with other petroleum based products but as I previously posted I can't use those products on my camo shotgun barrels because they contain solvents which will eat the camo material.

    Thank you for the info guys!

  9. #9
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    The nice part about frog lube is that it's safe to use on every part of your gun. Even synthetics and wood. It's not a solvent like some petroleum based oils and lubes so it doesn't soften the plastics. I've only used it on one of my guns, but after Rancid's report, I'm going to expand that.

    The reason you "heat" and actually warm is probably a better description, is to expand the pores of the metal to allow it to penetrate. It really doesn't take a lot of heat and even some people say just leaving it out in the sun (assuming the ambient isn't 20 below...) is enough.

    One of the off shoots for a carry gun is that it doesn't have to be dripping with oils. Which means no stained clothes if you conceal.

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