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Thread: Rock snot... here for centuries, here to stay.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default Rock snot... here for centuries, here to stay.

    http://www.adn.com/2014/05/13/346897.../99/100/&ihp=1. Looks like a much bigger problem than can be solved by controlling how humans use the streams.

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    Duh. The banning of felt soles was just another gov't run amuck measure without any basis in reality.

    But it's too late now. We are already over the edge of the slippery slope that leads to Agenda 21 type environmental protections.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Duh. The banning of felt soles was just another gov't run amuck measure without any basis in reality.

    But it's too late now. We are already over the edge of the slippery slope that leads to Agenda 21 type environmental protections.
    JOAT, there are more than one invasive that needs control. I believe the felt soles had a number of plants/invasives associated with the regulation.

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    Did the waterfowl have to quit wearing their felt soles too?

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    Point taken, but felt doesn't dry and gets transported thousands of miles overnight.

    They didn't make you throw out your waiters or boats or flies or other gear, just the felt, which is uniquely problematic.

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    Invasive plants are a major issue and every effort to control their spread should be done. For example here on the Kenai we are spending 500,000 dollars to try to eliminate Elodea from a couple of lakes in the hopes of stopping its spread. Other aquatic invasive plants are also being eliminated where they are found or at least to keep the spread slower. I would assume everyone would clean their boats, equipment, and anything that would increase the spread rate of these harmful invasive species. If nothing more out of self interest. When they take hold lakes and river production of sport fish goes down and then people ask why did the government not do something?

    Hogfamily, the day waterfowl have felt soles is the day evolution has run amuck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerka View Post
    ...Hogfamily, the day waterfowl have felt soles is the day evolution has run amuck.

    UH OH !



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    Very good and I needed that. I will be on the lookout for these birds. Should be open season with no limit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerka View Post
    Invasive plants are a major issue and every effort to control their spread should be done. For example here on the Kenai we are spending 500,000 dollars to try to eliminate Elodea from a couple of lakes in the hopes of stopping its spread. Other aquatic invasive plants are also being eliminated where they are found or at least to keep the spread slower. I would assume everyone would clean their boats, equipment, and anything that would increase the spread rate of these harmful invasive species. If nothing more out of self interest. When they take hold lakes and river production of sport fish goes down and then people ask why did the government not do something?

    Hogfamily, the day waterfowl have felt soles is the day evolution has run amuck.
    This first line in bold is very true. However, this study shows rock snot is not invasive; it has always been here. So banning felt soles cannot stop or slow its spread; it lies dormant in the water until the proper mix of environmental conditions causes it to bloom. Take rock snot out of the invasives argument; argue against organisms that truly are invasive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    This first line in bold is very true. However, this study shows rock snot is not invasive; it has always been here. So banning felt soles cannot stop or slow its spread; it lies dormant in the water until the proper mix of environmental conditions causes it to bloom. Take rock snot out of the invasives argument; argue against organisms that truly are invasive.
    I think I mentioned that the felt soles was more than rock snot control. Also, I do not believe that the article said every lake has it so keeping humans from spreading it is still a good idea.


    Even when we have a clear invasive like northern pike in the Mat/su there are still those denying its impact.

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    This study shows that controlling people will only score political points and not really address the issue of rock snot growth. Since the issue with rock snot seems to be that of controlling its growth rather than its spread, fighting only to stop its spread is a losing battle. If rock snot is to be controlled, the battle must be fought on all fronts. Focusing everything on an issue that isn't even an issue in many waterways only allows the out of balance critter to grow stronger and shift the balance further.

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    Felt was whirling disease, primarily, wasn't it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike h View Post
    Felt was whirling disease, primarily, wasn't it?


    Huh? Someone say rock snot?

    Ha!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike h View Post
    Felt was whirling disease, primarily, wasn't it?
    Actually testimony was quite mixed. Rock snot came out as the big boogeyman, as it had been confirmed in several Southeast streams where it hadn't been recorded before. Whirling disease is hatchery borne and not as big a concern here; a ban on wearing felts from other states would have solved that.

    There may be very good reason for not wearing felts, as they are a big vector in the transport of critters. Korkers has a study showing that laces and neoprene booties carry nearly as much stuff, so removing felts doesn't do as much as claimed. All wading materials should be bleach sprayed and allowed to dry between uses in different bodies of water; just taking felt out of the game doesn't do all the job.

    Additional testimony at the time by TU was that other wading shoe materials were just as effective as felt in giving traction. I like aggressive carbide cleats, but my rubber raft doesn't. Other sole designs don't grip like felt in slick rock streams.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Actually testimony was quite mixed. Rock snot came out as the big boogeyman, as it had been confirmed in several Southeast streams where it hadn't been recorded before. Whirling disease is hatchery borne and not as big a concern here; a ban on wearing felts from other states would have solved that.

    There may be very good reason for not wearing felts, as they are a big vector in the transport of critters. Korkers has a study showing that laces and neoprene booties carry nearly as much stuff, so removing felts doesn't do as much as claimed. All wading materials should be bleach sprayed and allowed to dry between uses in different bodies of water; just taking felt out of the game doesn't do all the job.

    Additional testimony at the time by TU was that other wading shoe materials were just as effective as felt in giving traction. I like aggressive carbide cleats, but my rubber raft doesn't. Other sole designs don't grip like felt in slick rock streams.
    Unfortunately, this is not a true statement. In the past, US hatcheries have served as a vector for most outbreaks, but not all. It can survive and propagate in the wild in the correct environment. It's native to Europe and hatcheries have had no role with it's initial findings.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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    http://juneauempire.com/stories/0610...70610007.shtml Good article on whirling disease in Alaska. The major players in the spread of whirling disease in the US HAVE been hatcheries. Once in a waterway there are all sorts of ways to spread it, but most if not all outbreaks have been traced to hatcheries. In Alaska, as I said, for a variety of reasons whirling disease is not as big a concern.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    http://juneauempire.com/stories/0610...70610007.shtml Good article on whirling disease in Alaska. The major players in the spread of whirling disease in the US HAVE been hatcheries. Once in a waterway there are all sorts of ways to spread it, but most if not all outbreaks have been traced to hatcheries. In Alaska, as I said, for a variety of reasons whirling disease is not as big a concern.
    Sure, hatcheries have been the main culprit at spreading the disease, but you stated whirling disease is hatchery born. Two different statements. As everyone knows, hatcheries are not the only vector for spreading the disease down south. Man has many means for ruining a fishery. The main preventative variable that keeps whirling disease from spreading up here is temperature.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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