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Thread: New to me xtreme shallow

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    Default New to me xtreme shallow

    Hi everyone just bought a new to me extreme shallow 2175!!! Was wondering if anyone had a list of tools they carry with them and what is the maintaince practices??

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    Also what is the most forgiving riverto learn in was thinking the little sue

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    This time of year. The Deshka landing to the mouth of the Yentna is pretty simple. Everyones on the water, wait and follow someone down and possibly back if need be. Just go for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by amcnak View Post
    Also what is the most forgiving riverto learn in was thinking the little sue
    Little sue will land you in trouble, run the big sue down to deshka, pretty simple.

    Little sue is not a good river to learn on.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    Learn on a lake. See how it handles on turns, how to stop it, what it takes to get on step..... etc.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtofak View Post
    Learn on a lake. See how it handles on turns, how to stop it, what it takes to get on step..... etc.
    Yep!..2nd that!
    ...learning to operate my new wooly.jet on 2 dif lakes!..one
    More session and then time to hit the rivers!

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    Get yourself a winch. I have a lewis chain saw winch, and extra line/cable for further reach. There are others around that work also for less money. At the very least carry a good come a long, and some cable to extend it. with a come a long, rope stretches too much to be much use. If you have room, some 4' chunks of plastic pipe to roll your boat with. I don't think a boat like that will have any difficulity with the Knik, littel su, big su, deshka, or yetna and those are popular rivers, if you do get it stuck, help will be along shortly, or at least the next day. In Sept/Oct when they are really low, that is what you are practicing for this time of year. Enjoy it. Bud
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    A parachute anchor / drift sock may come in handy if there's nothing nearby to tie a winch cable to.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    What to bring?.... A buddy! You will get stuck, and he's gonna be worth the beer!

    The Sue is by far the best river to learn on. Anything south of the bridge is no problem, but try and stay in the main channel until you get comfortable reading the braids. Braids WILL lead to some pretty tight places and some unpassable stuff- so don't take them lightly.

    If your looking for a River to learn how to run in skinny water, Deshka is great. Always remember, those boats are heavy so they need to go fast to stay on step. Rivers change every year so be ready for a log jam or sweeper around every corner. Like I said, you will get stuck, so a buddy is worth his weight in gold if ya got one.

    Definitely start on a lake like others mentioned. It will let you know how the boat handles with the River dynamics, then the river forces will be easier to understand.

    That's at a great boat! But never underestimate these rivers! Been there, done that, now I respect them

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    Quote Originally Posted by asjel13 View Post
    What to bring?.... A buddy! You will get stuck, and he's gonna be worth the beer!

    The Sue is by far the best river to learn on. Anything south of the bridge is no problem, but try and stay in the main channel until you get comfortable reading the braids. Braids WILL lead to some pretty tight places and some unpassable stuff- so don't take them lightly.

    If your looking for a River to learn how to run in skinny water, Deshka is great. Always remember, those boats are heavy so they need to go fast to stay on step. Rivers change every year so be ready for a log jam or sweeper around every corner. Like I said, you will get stuck, so a buddy is worth his weight in gold if ya got one.

    Definitely start on a lake like others mentioned. It will let you know how the boat handles with the River dynamics, then the river forces will be easier to understand.

    That's at a great boat! But never underestimate these rivers! Been there, done that, now I respect them
    While I agree with most of your advice, I would NOT recommend the Deshka as a river to learn on. Right now it is one of the ONLY rivers open for Kings. There will be alot of traffic on it in the near future. There are lots of blind corners and very large rocks strewn about that river that could lead to a serious injury or worse if two boats were to meet in the wrong spot. This NOT the place to learn to run a boat. The Big su is the place to play and learn. Pick a couple braids that have clear visibility and hone your skills.

    In the last 10 years there have been a couple people (kids) that have been killed when 2 airboats met on a corner.
    Another bad accident involed a group of 6 or so that were medivaced out when a couple jet boats collided. Keep this in mind when you plan your trip and avoid high traffic areas to learn the skills and abilities of your boat. You could literally be taking your life, your occupants, and some innocent other boaters lives in your hands if you don't know what you are doing......
    BK

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    While I agree with most of your advice, I would NOT recommend the Deshka as a river to learn on. Right now it is one of the ONLY rivers open for Kings. There will be alot of traffic on it in the near future. There are lots of blind corners and very large rocks strewn about that river that could lead to a serious injury or worse if two boats were to meet in the wrong spot. This NOT the place to learn to run a boat. The Big su is the place to play and learn. Pick a couple braids that have clear visibility and hone your skills.

    In the last 10 years there have been a couple people (kids) that have been killed when 2 airboats met on a corner.
    Another bad accident involed a group of 6 or so that were medivaced out when a couple jet boats collided. Keep this in mind when you plan your trip and avoid high traffic areas to learn the skills and abilities of your boat. You could literally be taking your life, your occupants, and some innocent other boaters lives in your hands if you don't know what you are doing......
    BK
    Ditto what he said..!

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    Yes avoid the Deshka till you get some time, it has some very unforgiving can openers in it. not to mention the amount of boat traffic!
    The Big Sue is a good one, give me a holler sometime and we will go burn some fuel. It is nice to spin around on a lake but nothing like following some one and learning to read the rivers-- I learned more from following folks around than i could have ever learned on my own.
    Your boat will handle much differantly on a lake versus a river.
    I may be out on the Big Sue and Yentna on Sat, you are welcome to come along, just doing some site seeing and fishing.
    Mike

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    Like mike stated I'll be on the big sue next Tuesday or Wednesday looking for hooligan if you want to follow. Mike I went out Friday was a lot of fun short cut was skinny but didn't have any problems
    Is it opening day of duck season yet
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    It's always nice to go with someone. What I found was they go fast because they know the river. It made me think I should also go fast, this got me into a lot of trouble when I had no one to show me
    the way. If you want to be safe and stay off the sandbars slow down until you learn the river.

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    Agreed, slow is much better for learning, but not only for learning- it is much easier on the fuel consumption also. You will see that running about 20-25mph will result in about 5-6gph versus 35-40mph at 12-18gph. The big thing for me about running slow, is you always have some throttle left to get you out of trouble if needed. (or make things worse )
    It gives you more time to read the water and react to things you see or did not see and hitting that big scary thing in the water is much more forgiving at slower speeds. Now fast does have its place, but take it easy till you get used to that thing.
    I run pretty slow most of the time, almost too slow for alot of folks but i like to enjoy the view out on the rivers..
    Mike

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    I also like to explore new areas and channels going up stream. Running upstream is slower, a good thing as mentioned, plus, if I guy does get stuck the current is usually helping push you back into deeper water, not into shallower water.

    I also would consider launching on the Big Su from Susitna Landing up at mile 82 on the Parks Hwy. From the landing there a guy can run up to Sheep Creek or Montana Creek, as well as run the 20 miles or so down to the Deshka River. The river is pretty braided in places but usually the deeper channels are easy to pick out and then there are a lot of side channels to run coming back upstream as you get braver, such as into the mouth of the Little Willow. Plus, being upstream of the Deshka Landing and the Willow Creek Campground could mean having a lower bail-out point if a guy got into trouble, where launching from the Deshka Landing means ending up in Cook Inlet. And finally, the launch at Susitna Landing is usually pretty quite and stress free compared to the Deshka Landing which can get pretty intense when everyone is trying to get on the river at the same time.

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    If you can find someone to follow or hook up with the folks offeringto do so. Take them up on it. Ask questions as to, why did you choose this path or braid, what made you change your course, etc. That is how I learned,I was fortunate enough to have a family friend take me under his wing (he had aDuckworth at the time) and school me. I bugged the crap out of him the firs tyear, but it was invaluable. On the BIG rivers itís pretty straight forward. Smaller rivers not so much. Believe it or not, you can actually see how the rivers flow and empty into the mainchannels, ya it sounds like some Jedi mind crap, but it took me about 4 years to finally see that and read the river correctly. You can see how the current moves and riffles turn to boils and chop lends to flat water. I liken it to the fall line when skiing down a mountain. If you were floating in a raft where would the current take meÖ It sounds weird but after a while you can process this in a heartbeat. HCL has a point slower is better, get the boat on step and leave some throttle. Once you get more confident, let her rip.

    Oh i forgot you are traveling much faster going downstream than up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by amcnak View Post
    Hi everyone just bought a new to me extreme shallow 2175!!! Was wondering if anyone had a list of tools they carry with them and what is the maintaince practices??

    Hi and congrats on the 2175. I have enjoyed mine for many years now. We added the Mercury smart craft gauge to monitor fuel consumption and GPH since the tank gauge was not accurate enough for my OCD. Of course I always carry extra gas as well...

    Ive also added the Wooly reverse bucket.... I think this is a no brainer for our boats... Throttle is a little "heavy" but I like reverse on my boats..

    Of course the other essentials like inverter for coffee pot, kicker or transom mount trolling motor, flush mount rod holders, full canvas, bow mounted winch for anchor, extra cup holders, rod holders and ladder under swim deck...I think that is most of it..

    Oh, there is a PDF floating around this site for our motors that describes basic maintenance... As someone else stated on this forum the Mercury Sportjet is kinda turn key...."Turn key and it starts"...

    M.
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    Default Optimax PDF

    Maybe this will help as well.
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    You guys are awesome I'm up at work till next Wednesday then I'm off for a week I would defenitly like to follow someone that knows what there doing I plan on doing a couple more lake runs but figure the only real way to learn is get out and do it the extreme I bought has the smart gauge and the pozi nozzle and the woolridge reverse bucket and full canopy it's fully loaded really can't wait to take it out and fish it

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