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Thread: Why do you hunt?

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    Member Ak for life's Avatar
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    Default Why do you hunt?

    Hey everyone, I am doing a research project for school on hunting in Alaska and wanted to know why some of you hunt. Just tell me why you hunt, how you got into hunting, and why you want to continue hunting. Thanks, AK for Life

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    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Why - as with most people more than one reason. in order of importance for me:
    1) time spent with loved ones/friends
    2) food in the freezer/pantry because I like the satisfaction of doing so and I believe it is healthier - physically, mentally, spiritually - than going to the store to buy meat.
    3) spending time in the world God created
    4)trophy (and as a taxidermist, that doesn't equate to larger antler/horn/skull size - for me it is the overall quality of the animal)

    I got into hunting because of a high school friend...looking for grouse. It ballooned from there into taxidermy because I wanted to be able to preserve the memories of my and my family's hunting and trapping adventures.

    I continue hunting because of the 4 reasons above, and in that order. AND I hope that my continued hunting will encourage other women/girls to hunt.
    Taxidermy IS art!
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    Your mount is more than a trophy, it's a memory. Relive The Memory!

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    Member HuntAK59's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak for life View Post
    Hey everyone, I am doing a research project for school on hunting in Alaska and wanted to know why some of you hunt. Just tell me why you hunt, how you got into hunting, and why you want to continue hunting. Thanks, AK for Life
    There are quite a few reasons. Simply bulleted, anyone can haze me if they want, but I care less of your opinion of me,
    1) It's good reasoning to be out in the wilderness, alone, needing to be quiet and observant of my surroundings. If just hiking, I'm often negligible to my far surroundings. Also, I wouldnt pay big $ to hike.
    2) The thrill of out manuevering an animal in the pursut.
    3) Self reliance. Being able to survive out there alone, catch the animal, butcher, cook then eat it. Not many can do that anymore
    4) Excitement. There is nothing like that 2% of hunting when the animal is in your range.
    5) Nature. I am at ease when outdoors. I dont know what it is, but I'm happy there.
    6) Comradery. Being in the middle of no where and knowing if things go wrong, you only have those around you to rely on. That is awesome.
    Grab a friend, a rifle and go hunt.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Why do you do what you are doing, the love of it?

    Are you doing this to advance your future employment on other peoples storys? If so then put this in your book. "I Tried it Myself" and then you will find out more answers than you can from a forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak for life View Post
    Hey everyone, I am doing a research project for school on hunting in Alaska and wanted to know why some of you hunt. Just tell me why you hunt, how you got into hunting, and why you want to continue hunting. Thanks, AK for Life
    1. I hunt for food.
    2. My dad took me and taught me.
    3. I provide meat for my family and hunting is a fairly inexpensive activity for me.

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    The food you get from the land (and this is true for hunting, fishing, and agriculture) that you harvest or grow yourself is a better quality and generally much healthier than that which you might buy at a store-event he so called "fresh" foods. Game animals, such as moose/caribou/deer, wild hog, and grouse/ptarmigan/duck/wild turkey, contain more protein and less fat per pound than even the leanest beef, pork, or chicken that you can buy in a store. When you harvest an animal for the freezer/table, and you process that animal from trigger pull to table setting, you know exactly what is in the food you and your family are eating, and you what is NOT in the food. Living close to your food source eliminates the need for chemical preservatives and additives. The more "ingredients" a food product has, the less nutritional value and the higher potential health risks over the long term.

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    Member Longbow6360's Avatar
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    Why I hunt. I love the beautiful, clean meat you can't get from an unknown source. I love being out in the outdoors. I love the challenge that both the animals and the environment gives me. I love introducing youth into "my world". And who doesn't love sharing a campfire at night with family and friends?

    How I got into hunting. My Dad introduces us kids into hunting at a very early age. It's where he taught me how to make a fire, pitch a tent, cook over a fire, skin a buck, shoot a gun, load shells, walk quietly, glass for animals, identify plants, track an animal, where to hold on an animal, obeying the game laws, the importance of shooting the excess out of a game population or leaving them alone to rebuild, how to call a coyote, dig a latrine....I could go on and on. Most of it revolves around learning and appreciating and utilizing what nature offers us.

    Why I continue to hunt. See all of the above. Plus, I live on an island. Food has to be flown in at a premium expense. Not only do I get to do the thing I love for the meat I savor, now it's a matter of sustenance.

    Hope your project turns out nicely. Please post it when you get done.

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Many times Iíve hunted have ended up with a good haul; many times nothing. Many hunts have been with good friends or family. Many times have been alone, including in fairly remote areas.

    Sometimes, when hunting big game alone, I have spent so many hours in anticipation that my senses are at peak demand for hours at a time.

    Sitting on a remote 15-degree ridge in Colorado by myself for hours at a time; every snap sound (like a broken twig) within a mile or so gives me a heart-felt jolt. What was that? Is it a giant elk coming into view shortly? Or is it a squirrel or a falling branch?

    In these situations, I have had semi-religious experiences where I can suddenly, but calmly, recall childhood experiences that I otherwise would have died without remembering. Something about my senses being so unusually extended gives me a slightly different mental state. And it evolves into a kind of strange combination with nature. Deer hunting or squirrel hunting, I have found that, if I sit down alone and donít move or make a sound for 30 minutes or so, often nature forgets Iím there. And it all starts coming out. Hawks and other birds fly feet in front of me. Strange creatures run or crawl right near my spot. Itís like Iím part of nature for a moment. A non-hunter especially from the city might never understand; thinking Iím just trying to kill like a pathological murderer of innocent beings. Me, no. Iím just becoming part of the nature and the competition for life. Thatís frankly why I sometimes like responsible hunting of big predators, like brown bear. Thereís at least a small danger that I might lose.

    Something about hunting in difficult situations and in remote nature gives me a stronger connection with myself, God, and nature that I canít quite get any other way or in any other place--whether I'm hunting squirrels, geese, deer, or brown bear. My young sons seem to get the same kind of feeling, but they're still developing their own selves.

    Oh, and I love sharing the awesome meat from a recent hunt.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak for life View Post
    Hey everyone, I am doing a research project for school on hunting in Alaska and wanted to know why some of you hunt. Just tell me why you hunt, how you got into hunting, and why you want to continue hunting. Thanks, AK for Life
    This may sound a bit odd, but I hunt because I'm a hunter. Whether its cause is due to a genetic predisposition or a trained habit I cannot say; what I do know is that I am a hunter and simply must hunt. I do not remember not hunting, so I suspect that as I started walking, I actually began stalking prey. The reason I continue hunting is due to the fact that I was born a hunter and that I remain a hunter. I'm suspicious that my hunting is somehow connected to my habit of breathing and that they will cease at roughly the same moment.........
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  10. #10

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    If I'm being truly honest, then I would say mostly for my sanity. It gives me peace, joy, relaxation, recreation, happiness and so much more.

    But from a practical standpoint, I could always give the usual answers given below to justify my addiction.

    Because I love the taste of wild game over store bought food.

    Because wild game is much healthier than store bought food.

    Because wild game is cheaper than store bought food (not really when you consider how much money we spend on gear and travel etc.).

    Because of the quality time spent with family and friends.

    To spend time outdoors and the exercise.

    We could go all day on this one...

    I think you would be better off creating a poll with a list of choices. I think that will serve your purpose for your research better.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Jack nailed it above. Well said, sir.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    This may sound a bit odd, but I hunt because I'm a hunter.
    I think. Therefore, I am. (Descartes)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak for life View Post
    Hey everyone, I am doing a research project for school on hunting in Alaska and wanted to know why some of you hunt. Just tell me why you hunt, how you got into hunting, and why you want to continue hunting. Thanks, AK for Life
    I hunt to be a full participant in the world in which I live. I like to eat meat. This means I have four choices.

    1. I can scavenge meat from animals that have died from old age, or accidents, or were killed by other animals. While this method works for some animals, it has it's drawbacks. A couple of drawbacks are, you can't depend on always finding a dead animal to eat when you need it or want it. You can't count on the quality of a dead animal you find.

    2. I can let someone else provide my meat for me. I actually use this method a lot. It's convenient, it seems to be reliable. I can always find meat in a store or restaurant. But it does have some drawbacks. I have to depend on whoever provides my meat to put the quality of what I eat over their profit. That isn't always a sure deal. In order to ensure they don't have a crop failure meat suppliers depend on drugs to keep animals alive and relatively healthy. They also use drugs such as steroids to maximize the growth of their animals so they can maximize their profits. Many of these drugs have an affect on humans also, that isn't always good. Some meat providers cut corners handling meat in order to maximize their profits. This can result in disease such as E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella among others. Also, I have to have something in trade or to pay for meat I obtain for others, so I still have to work for what others provide me.

    3. I can grow my own. This requires I have a place to raise animals. I have to buy or raise their food. I have to deal with their waste. I have to be available to care for them, even if I want to do something else, or I have to pay someone to do it for me. In other words, there is a lot of time and work involved.

    4. I can obtain my own meat by hunting or fishing. This method has it's drawbacks too, such as availability. It's often a seasonable method with modern game management, and wild animals have their cyclical ups and downs in population. I have to have the skill to make a successful kill, take care of the meat, and transport it home while ensuring it's quality. And I'm often competing for the same animals with other hunters, even if not directly. But it makes me feel like I am a part of a natural cycle, and that satisfies some part of my soul. And there is a satisfaction in knowing you can get the job done and don't need to depend on others to do it for you.

    And that is why I hunt. I like the meat, and I enjoy the satisfaction of providing for myself. Some added bonuses are being a very real participant in nature and spending time enjoying nature. I think the time spent in the wilds actually helps you appreciate nature. I also get to share that with friends and family.

    I got into hunting by following my dad around while he hunted when I was very young. I started fishing at 4 from a bridge dad built over the creek behind our house. I was allowed to go there by myself with our cocker spaniel trailing along. Old Spike and I had many great adventures catching bullheads, crawdads, and cutthroat trout. I was probably 5 or 6 the first time I accompanied dad on a grouse hunt. And by 7, I'd accompany him on deer hunts. I still remember the first deer I watched him shoot, a spike that jumped out of it's bed as we still hunted through some timber. I remember trying to be quiet and to step where dad stepped as we made our way through the woods. And getting slapped in the face by a branch if I followed to closely. By the time I was 10 and got my first hunting license, there was no doubt I was going to be a hunter.

    My dad passed last week-end. So now I have one more reason to hunt. I'm sure every time I make a sneak on a deer or walk an old road or trail looking for a grouse, I'm going to feel dad there beside me. Hunting is a way to keep my connection to dad and the lessons he taught me.
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    Member .300wby's Avatar
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    Come on guys.... Don't forget to mention the "look at me" forum posts. Ego stroking. 4 pages of ooohs, ahhs and atta boys on the latest penninsula BB. That dude must feel awesome

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    My dad passed last week-end.
    Very sorry to hear this. Sounds like you had a great life with him. Believe me, you will think of him every time you're out there doing what you and he loved.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    If I'm being truly honest, then I would say mostly for my sanity. It gives me peace, joy, relaxation, recreation, happiness and so much more.
    This sums it up for me too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    If I'm being truly honest, then I would say mostly for my sanity. It gives me peace, joy, relaxation, recreation, happiness and so much more.

    But from a practical standpoint, I could always give the usual answers given below to justify my addiction.

    Because I love the taste of wild game over store bought food.

    Because wild game is much healthier than store bought food.

    Because wild game is cheaper than store bought food (not really when you consider how much money we spend on gear and travel etc.).

    Because of the quality time spent with family and friends.

    To spend time outdoors and the exercise.

    We could go all day on this one...

    I think you would be better off creating a poll with a list of choices. I think that will serve your purpose for your research better.
    Bingo! This would've been my response as well...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .300wby View Post
    Come on guys.... Don't forget to mention the "look at me" forum posts. Ego stroking. 4 pages of ooohs, ahhs and atta boys on the latest penninsula BB. That dude must feel awesome
    Sharing success isn't necessarily about ego stroking. There is joy in hunting, and there is joy in sharing success. I don't read (or write) such stories as "look at me", but rather as sharing joy, excitement, and blessing.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    For the most part, I hunt because I have to. That's really the case living this far out in the bush. Which makes it somewhat different in other ways too. Hunting for me can be (emphasis on "can") many of those things Jack mentioned, but it can also be very stressful if I'm not finding game and bringing the meat home. It can become just another chore that needs to be done, that you want to be done with. The sincere need to supply the protein and fat for myself and my family, to not have an alternative like a local grocery store, makes for a different kind of hunt and hunter I think.

    A few years ago I was not having any luck finding a moose during the fall hunt. I would lay awake at night a dozen miles upriver from home, solo, anxious and frustrated. Right at sunup I'd be out looking for moose but also hunting muskrats and beavers on various sloughs I'd drag the canoe into. I came home with beavers and muskrats the last day of the season and I trapped beaver under the ice all winter so we had enough meat and fat to get us by. You do what you have to ... but if you asked me if it was fun, or relaxing ... not so much <grin>.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    You do what you have to ... but if you asked me if it was fun, or relaxing ... not so much <grin>.
    Yep, I'm sure most don't really realize that hunting would take on quite a different meaning when you absolutely "have to" just to survive......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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