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Thread: Trout spawning

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    Member wesak81's Avatar
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    Default Trout spawning

    When do exactly trout spawn in the lakes. Is it right when yen ice goes off the lakes or is it a certain time or the temp of the water what makes them get in the mode ? Just wondering.


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    what type of Trout no pat answer the Bows spaun in streams May to June, I have been told lakers in the Fall in lakes , Dolies in the fall not sure, grayling in the spring in streams there again not sure SID

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    Rainbow trout the ones we have around here in the anchorage, valley areas. In our local lakes


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    Most stocked rainbows are sterile

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    Yes I know but I do belive the sterile ones still go into a pre mock spawn mode. I noticed this on several lakes last year in the Palmer wasilla area. After the ice went out. I seen hogs in the shallows but they don't bite.


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    Predominately, it comes down to diurnal length and water temperatures. Usually when the water temp hits 41-44 degrees in the spring, that will trigger the peak spawn. Other variables are at play as well; stress level, fat content, flow rate, etc.
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    Lujon is right. All the lakes that are stocked with rainbows in the landlocked lakes in the valley are triploid (sterile) trout. Wild rainbow trout are in lakes with streams systems that run through them like Cottonwood Lake and Wasilla Lake. These rainbows spawn in Cottonwood Creek in the spring. But I believe it is closed right now to fishing until after they spawn, which is sometime in the middle of June. Rainbows do not spawn directly in the lake itself. They actually require flowing water to spawn. Lake trout spawn in the lakes in the fall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Lujon is right. All the lakes that are stocked with rainbows in the landlocked lakes in the valley are triploid (sterile) trout. Wild rainbow trout are in lakes with streams systems that run through them like Cottonwood Lake and Wasilla Lake. These rainbows spawn in Cottonwood Creek in the spring. But I believe it is closed right now to fishing until after they spawn, which is sometime in the middle of June. Rainbows do not spawn directly in the lake itself. They actually require flowing water to spawn. Lake trout spawn in the lakes in the fall.
    Unfortunately, this statement is not entirely true. For the most part, landlocked lakes that are stocked with rainbows are stocked with predominately diploid (fertile) rainbow trout since their is no concern of escaping. When they stock an open system, all species of fish stocked must be triploids (sterile) since their is a chance they may escape and spawn with native stocks. Due to an increase in illegal stocking by the public, their is a push to eventually go to 100% triploid in open and closed systems. See link below for conformation.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...iesSearch.main

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...Hatcheries.faq
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    Stocked land locked lakes with sterile rainbow trout go through a mock spawn just like regular trout most of them in the spring but I have caught spawning collared bows in July and September with hooked noses. Most spawn or mock spawn in the spring but some will at other times when the water temp is right. I also noticed that rainbows don't seem to need a lot of water movement to spawn as I have caught them in the center of a lake near an underwater spring as well as near little trickles of creeks that are not deep enough for them to spawn in. I took a walk around the Wasilla Lake park swimming area a few years ago in May and could see several big rainbows out in the shallows spawning there is no creek near their Cottonwood creek in a long ways away.

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    Yeah, I forgot to mention that rainbows do not need flowing water in order to spawn. It's preferred, but not required to accomplish successful spawning. As mentioned, they will usually try to find an upwelling or spring if they are restricted to a lake.
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    I am sorry but i don't understand. why would it matter if hatchery raised fish spawned in non landlocked areas? Please excuse my ignorance on this but it is all new to me. Thanks -Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by RG_86 View Post
    I am sorry but i don't understand. why would it matter if hatchery raised fish spawned in non landlocked areas? Please excuse my ignorance on this but it is all new to me. Thanks -Bob
    All hatchery rainbow trout are from Swanson River origin. There are many open system lakes across the state that are stocked. Let's stick with the Mat-Su Valley for discussion. Many, many open system lakes eventually drain into the Susitna River. If hatchery diploid (fertile) rainbows from one of these lakes makes it's way down into the Susitna River they will spawn with the native Susitna River rainbows and contaminate the genetic structure of the Susitna River rainbows. This is a big no-no with ADF&G's genetic stocking policy.
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    if F & G had the same rules back then as what they have now , do you think we would have the fishing as we do today ???????
    [I don't think so] SID

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