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Thread: 2000 Tundra R

  1. #1
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default 2000 Tundra R

    I just got a barley used Tundra, something like 20 hrs on it. Its my first machine. What can I say, I'm a newbie.

    I did my research and most people thought it was a good deal.

    The question is:

    Any upgrades I should look into? Wider skis? Or what?

  2. #2
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    Ski skins are nice if you intend to ride in deep snow. I never put expensive plastic skis on mine since the skis represented about 1/3 of the total price for the machine. You might consider keeping a spare primer pump in the tool kit. Mine had a habit of drying out the O rings and not pumping gas. I changed it many times in order to get my machine started. It's easy and quick to do. Maybe other guys don't experience that problem but I sure did.

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    MBRP can, C&A pro skis, boss seat, VForce Reeds .....just kidding!! What kind of upgrades are you looking for? Stuff for trapping or what?

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default plans

    I have plans for some skins. And a gun boot bracket. I will be doing some experimental trapping on it. Mostly I will be using it to get to some cabins out the the white mountains and seeing some country that is unaccessible in the summer.

    One thing it doesn't have in hand warmers and I was wondering if it is very hard to add those. If anyone has any experience with that let me know.

    If anyone has any ideas on common failure points on these machines that I can prepare for it would be nice.

    Does anyone have a favorite cargo sled they like to pull?

  5. #5

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    handwarmers are pretty easy to add. You just need to buy a universal kit. they will work good as long as you have fairly thing handgrips. I am assuming you are in the interior. I would go talk to Al at The Sled Shop on Dawson in north pole. He's a pretty good guy and better to deal with than most of the dealers in fairbanks.

  6. #6
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    As far as sleds go, check out this thread started by Alaska_Lanche. Lots of good info!

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    Default Tundra Mods

    Ive trapped on tundras for years. Heres what I recommend.
    1) Ski skins for sure, they give you more float in deeper snow.
    2) Take off your skegs, if there new enough to weld on, weld some 3/8" cold rolled steel on them to make them wear longer.
    3) Hand warmers and those deals you put your hands in on the handle bars. It lets you wear thinner gloves while running your line if thats what your into.
    4) Gun boot. The first gen. I think, the one with the bolt holes. Not those clip in Koplins. They wont hold up in brush.
    5) Dont put home made boxes or other stuff on the back. Tundras are narrow and like to turn over all by themself they dont need help by having there CG raised
    6) Depending on what your doing, Id consider putting a studs on the track. This will be great crossing ice pulling a sled.
    7) If you plan on doing alot of remote hunting/trapping I like caping off the oil lines and pre mixing all my gas. If your injector clogs in the bush its a looong walk back. Then just keep a spare bottle of 2 cycle oil up in your cowling.

    Thats what I'd do. I like going into some nasty stuff along way out and try to plan for emergency situations. Also you might think of a small block and tackle pre rigged and put in a little bag up front. This will help you if you have to pull out of overflow or some place where you dont quite have enough butt to pull out of.
    Tundras arnt tanks or hill climbers but with the right planning and riding skill, they will suprise you.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Sounds like there are some seasoned veterans out there with Tundras. I am going to go down to the Sled Shop tomorrow and see what I can I can find. I never thought about adding to the skegs, thats a good idea. As far as I can tell they are just about brand new. About the only thing I plan on putting in the back"basket" is a milk crate. Fits perfectly.

    Jim,

    You are the second person to mention no using the oil injection system to me. Do they fail often? I really like the idea but if it is trouble some maybe its not worth it. I think that I will hold off on the studs for at least the first year. I have already gotten a block and tackle together and a survival kit (saved me a few times on my wheeler). I agree with the first generation gun boot, as I have one my my wheeler and it has survived a couple of roll overs and countless brush encounters.

    Thanks for all the advice.

    One other quick question. Is it worth it to buy name brand oil or will any old stuff do? Keep in mind that Interior winters can be harsh.

    byrd

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    I've ridden lots of snowmachines for lots of years for lots of miles and have never had or heard of a friend having an oil injection failure. Tundras use so little oil that I always stayed with SkiDoo oil. Other oils will work fine. Just pick one and stick with it. Since you're in cold country, definitely go with a synthetic injector oil. Pass on the Wal Mart universal 2-stroke oil.

    Unless you intend to ride on bare earth your stock wear bars are perfectly adequate. Aftermarket bars with hard weld and several lengths of carbide are easily found. Remember, it's a Tundra, not an ice racer.

    Cold Cutter ice screws are a cheaper, easier, and less destructive alternative to studs. If you find that you need more traction on hard snow you can add these in an evening without removing the track.

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    The only reason I mentioned the pre mix is that I had one lock up on me a few years ago on the danalli. I just think its bullet proof on older machines. I dont do it on my newer ones. Thats a good idea on screws instead of studs. I do that on my wheeler and it goes great on Ice. I had forgotten to mention that trick. I trap in a wind blown area so my skegs take a beating. I had a buddy that came up with welding up the extra thick skegs and they lasted alot longer than on my sled that at the time used the stock ones. It never fails that I get lazy and forget to keep an eye on the skegs, they wear out and by the time I notice Im into the steel ski. Just a cheap thought. I love tinkering with tundras those little machines are darn near immortal. One more thing. My old trapping partner put a thin metal brace on the inside of the tall windshield to give it more rigidity when dealing with limbs. Heck theres so much stuff a guy can do. Most of it comes from lots of time fixing damage from the line and beefing it up sos not to break again.

  11. #11
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default one winter

    Im not planning on riding too much ice, Occasionally I will have to cross some over flow or go ice fishing and stuff like that. But most of the riding I will do is going to be on trails with a little exploring. I think that I will hold off on hard faced skegs unless they seem to fail quickly. However skins are a must.

    One question, and you will have to forgive my inexperience. I plan on riding at many different elevations, and I have read a little bit about having to adjust your carb when you have dramatic changes in elevation. I will be riding mostly around Fairbanks, but I might want to take it up to Summit for a weekend or something. Am I going to have trouble with the elevation changes?, and if so what can I do to fix it?

    What about a bar riser, I see all of the new sleds with much taller handle bars for riding while standing up. Any thoughts?

    I realize Tundras and not fast, its not why I got the sled, I got it for it reliability and simplicity. I wanted something that I could "learn" to ride on. Something that I could get unstuck myself. Something to have fun on and not break the bank (7K for a new one these days), not too much of a speed demon anymore.

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    Ive never even messed with rejetting a tundra, they seem to do fine at summit. As far as riding a tundra your in for a treet. First thing is you dont ride a tundra, you lean on them. This is to say you ride with one knee on the seat and stand on the other. That way you can shift your wt. from one side to another to help balence. The only time you sit down is on long straight stretches. But be careful because if you hit somthing that throws you out of level, your going for a ride if your not ready. There narrow and very tippy by nature but thats why they dont need alot of trail. Its a good sled to learn weight distribution with. Once you master a tundra, you can ride just about anything. Thats not to say your ready to highmark thompson pass or anything. Youll just understand how to counter the riding forces that effect all sleds. You will also come to realize that you dont need bar extinsions or other stuff that folks bolt on there sleds. You dont have a pleasure machine. You have a basic tool for transportation. Tundras are not built for fun. There built for work. They will beat you to death and turn you over but all the time they get you home at the end of the day. There great for hunting/trapping but fun stuff isnt there thing.

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    What causes the oil injection to fail on the Tundras is the screws back out that hold the oil pump together. Look at where the oil line goes into the engine and there are 2 (i think) screws that hold the small assembly in place. These screws back out and allow gears inside the oil pump to strip, causing failure. These screws should be a regular maintenance check.

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    Like Jim, I never rejetted, even for those 45* spring days. I never found it necessary.

    I prefer any snowmachine's handlebars to be high enough to allow me to stand with a straight back. A little knee flex is acceptable. This has nothing to do with wanting to ride standing like all the kids these days, but it gives me leverage and freedom of movement for quick maneuvering. Besides, I don't like to sit when I have to bang trough a really bumpy stretch of trail. I'll get my feet centered on the sled and minimize the jarring I have to take by standing and letting my knees absorb the shock. Tundras don't have cushy suspensions. Adequate, yes, but I'll still stand in the banger bumps.

    Unlike Jim, I think a Tundra is a pleasure to own and ride. In fact they're a kick in the pants. You don't need 150 hp or to drive 100 mph on a snow-go to have fun. Give me a Tundra, some soft snow, and a forest to play in, and I'm all smiles. But I like to ride!

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    I didnt say I didnt like them ;-).. I dont even own one now but I used to. I got a cushy 500 fan with elec. reverse . It wont go alot of places my tundra would. I plan on owning one again though. Like you said, I seldom ride for fun, I just use atv's or sleds to get where Im going.

  16. #16
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default jetting

    It good to know I won't have to jet. I got a pair of ski skin and installed them last weekend. This gave me good reason to check out bottom of the ski carefully and they seem to be in good shape. I also installed some hand warmers. Just the generic ones that run of of 12V, they seem to work well, at least they feel nice and toasty warm on an 80 degree day up here in FBX.

    One other question I have: I see a lot of folks running around with with bar risers and I can see the advantage of them when you are standing up. Should I put a riser on, and how high? Im 5'11".

    I also took the bolts out of the oil injection pump and used on lock tight on them. I will keep an eye on them to make sure they dont back out.

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    Default Oh My tundra

    I have 2 Tundra R's, well, actually one is the wifes but she lets me start it and put it back on the trail when she gets stuck. The only problem I have ever had is the primer pump drying out over the summer like an earlier post mentioned. Has anyone ever tried pumping straight oil through it?
    I would not mess with bar risers but then I'm only 5'9". I use mine for getting to the cabins or camps we go to, pulling a sled for gear or firewood. I carry a spare belt but have never needed to change one. We're been up at about 7500 Ft and no problem, maybe a slight loss of power.
    Bottom line is I think they are great machines, but like skis, boats, fishing rods or guns, one type does not do it all. But if I can only have one sno-go, it's going to be a tundra.

  18. #18

    Default Tundra

    I run a 96 Tundra and have power issuses at 3500ft. It is pre Tundra-R. I was looking into an altidude kit but maybe I have other issues.

  19. #19
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default First thing

    I am willing to bet the first place we get good snow will be high, so I will let you know how mine performs at higher altitudes. Only a couple of more months!

  20. #20

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    definitely would suggest pre mixing your tundra...If not,check the mounting bolts that hold your injector pump to the recoil every ride and take the little plastic key way that runns the injector off the crank and replace it yearly.Much easier to use pre mix with ams oil 50:1 and be done with it.Good machine with a bad flaw.Burned one up myself then rebuilt and went premix.Now the wifes 07 is premix as well.

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